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IMAGE '84 



^^ Table of Contents 

|H Opening 1-3 

^P Features 4-27 

Academics 28-43 

^ Faces 44133 

0M Organizations 134161 

Sports 162197 

^^ Ads 198-223 

J^ft Index 224-235 

^^r Closing 236-240 




Kemp sv ill e High 

School 

574 Kempsville 

Road 

Virginia Beach, 

Virginia 

23464 



1/3 




A Year To Remember 



Kempsville High Is In A Class Of Its Own 



EVEKVBODV KNOOJS 

THE OJORLD'S COOLEST 

STUDENTS 60 TO 

KEMP5\/ILLE HIGH SCHOOL.' 




Even Snoopy, alias Joe Cool, knows that Kempsville 
High Is number one. 



Robin DeLoatche wants to make sure that she 
chooses the perfect ring. 



Anew year has arrived, and students 
file through the doors of Kempsville 
High School, reflecting upon those wonder- 
ful memories of summer. This year is quite 
special, for Kempsville High commemo- 
rates its eighteenth year of establishment 
at the same time as many of the seniors 
celebrate their long awaited eighteenth 
birthdays. Excitement mounts among 
those who anticipate the upcoming year, 
and the spirit of Kempsville High captures 
the hearts of all. 

Cheerful faces and echoes of laughter 
brighten each day, concealing the daily 
pressures associated with school. The 
warm smiles of all create a friendly atmo- 
sphere, compelling many students to 
adopt the "grin and bear it" way of life. 

Many are oblivious to the old rusty lock- 
ers and the chipped paint on the walls 
which reveal Kempsville High School's 
"coming of age". Over the years many 
have endeavored to maintain the pride and 
spirit of Kempsville High. Each student 
strives to preserve the respect he has 
gained at Kempsville High, for everyone 
honors a "proud chief". 







2/Opening 







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Adam Wesberry thinks to himself, "If I were Presi- 
dent, I would propose a ban on all government 
classes." 

Forgetting to study for a major test, Annice Hirt be- 
gins to pray. 




Lunch is the only time that friends can get together 
and just be themselves. 



Opening/3 



^? 



4 /Divider 




Many school organizations at Kempsville High have 
projects for various reasons, such as this hot air 
balloon ride to celebrate Balloon Week 



Through the annual sales of caps, gowns, and gradu 
ation announcements, Herf Jones provides an invalu 
able service to the Kempsville senior. 



[Many unfortunate souls like Alan Fontanares, who 
Iforgot their bag lunches at home, must suffer through 
Ithe cafeteria food. 




Kempsville Characteristics 



t Kempsville High School, books, 
homework assignments, and tests are 
a major part of every student's daily routine. 
However, Kempsville is also a place where 
people have a chance to meet and make 
friends. Spending time with those friends will 
undoubtedly create lasting memories. The 
crowd cheering at the big game, people gaz- 
ing at the roaring bonfire during Spirit Week, 
or friends just conversing among themselves 
in the hall create special memories. These 
memorable moments are not restricted to 
school. For example senior Brad Shaw enjoys 
nothing more than "catching some waves" 
after school in the spring. The movies, con- 
certs, malls, and parties are also filled with 
fun moments. So relax and enjoy those spare 
moments which will create special memories! 



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Features/5 





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Chemistry is a course available to the juniors and seniors at KHS. Rod Annet 
and Greg Caddell complete a grueling quiz as the ever-present Periodic Table 
hangs in the background. 



A sensdtional victory over rivals Green Run to secure the Beach District Title 
supplies the Kempsville fans with something to cheer about and is the perfect 
ending to an otherwise ordinary day. 




Although the sophomores are the primary occupants of the P.E. classes, every 
KHS student has experienced the interesting physical education activities such 
as flag football 



6/Features 



Malia Miller and Beth Robertson use their valuable time to complete homework and 
review notes in the library. Throughout the day. the library is occupied by students 
using books and reference materials, and by those students wishing to study in a quiet 
area. 




Chief Territory 



A Typical Day On The Kempsville 
Reservation 

From 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, Sep- 
tember through June, approximately two thousand 
"Chiefs" reside at Kempsville High School. Although each KHS 
student is different, many follow similar daily routines. The typi- 
cal day begins with the mass arrival of the students. Those who 
have parking stickers drive, while those who do not either walk or 
ride the bus. From 7:30 a.m. to 7:54 a.m., most students socialize 
in the corridors while a few stay in the library or their first bell 
class to complete unfinished homework and study for tests. At 
7:55 a.m. the bell rings signalling the official start of the school 
day. English, math, science, and social studies are among the 
many classes attended by most students despite class rank. Of 
course these classes are taught on various levels depending on 
the student's class rank and past achievement. The foreign lan- 
guage and business classes offered at KHS are also popular stops 
for the students throughout the day. One place which almost 
every student visits at one point during his daily routine is the 
cafeteria. The time at which a student has lunch depends on the 
location of his fifth bell class. Because they have fulfilled scholas- 
tic requirements or have jobs, many KHS students are released 
early. The majority, though, must stay for six bells. At 2:00 p.m. 
the final bell rings, and the students depart. Those students in- 
volved in clubs and athletics, however, must remain for meetings 
or practice. 

The typical day may sound somewhat monotonous and dull, 
but this is not so. Because every "Chief" is individualistic, each 
day is colored with his unique, personal touch. Close friends and 
memorable moments also serve to transform a typical day into 
something special! 



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Although Mrs. Grimstead teaches American history and sociology, her lectures often ^ Jym^ ^yi^rr^^J- O i /«-.'! ■' O^^bLct^.-^!)-^ ^'Un:::6A-<^<yC!^ ^-^ .^6^^ 
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Features/7 




A small troupe of assistant principals and teachers holds its position in front of the 
school cafeteria. 



Bare legs at Kempsville is considered inappropriate by fashion conscious Ms Vinson 



8/ Features 



Don't Look Now, It's 1984! 



! Orwell's Vision — Fact Or Fiction? 

The year was 1984. George Orwell completed a book about the 
future, depicting a society in which the government regulates 
every aspect of one's life, from the books he reads, to the people he 
dates. The proletariats, or common workers, are harshly suppressed 
by a dictator known as "Big Brother." Big Brother maintains as army 
of stormtroopers known as the "Thought Police." They are responsi- 
ble for keeping track of every move a person makes and every 
thought a person has. The Thought Police accomplish this through 
the use of a "telescreen," which is similar to a two-way television. 
For the title of the book Orwell reversed the last two digits of the 
year in which it was finished. He called the book 1984 to let the 
people know that such a society may not be far in coming. It is now 
1984. 

Obviously not much of what Orwell predicted has come true, 
although some Kempsville students beg to differ. The speaker at- 
tached securely to the classroom wall often seems to take on the 
image of a "telescreen." Orders and commands are belched over the 
speaker such as: "Attend the football game!" "Buy a flower!" "Have 



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a wonderful Wednesday!" However, without these announcements, 
students and teachers would have no idea of what is happening at 
Kempsville. 

There are no posters of Big Brother's glaring eyes plastered all 
over the school walls. Instead, students are greeted every morning 
with the cheery smile emanating from the portrait of Mr. Caldwell in 
the main foyer. The closest thing Kempsville has to a Thought Police 
is a small renegade band of assistant principals who constantly 
patrol the lunchroom, halls, and bathrooms. The school cannot 
control who one choses to date, but a couple can be kept from 
practicing what should be "back seat " activities during school. 
So, Kempsville is not the totalitarian society depicted in Orwell's 

1984. Although students may find some of Kempsville's rules super- 
fluous and totally devoid of anything resembling logic, intelligence, 
and forethought, they should realize, as senior Scott Hoffman says, 

"Rules are made to insure that Kempsville will remain a safe and 
enjoyable learning institution for the student populace." 




Two lovestruck students are wrenched from each other's yearning arms by an 
embarassed Miss Compton. 



Senior Kyle Green is transfixed by the life-like portrait of Principal Charles Cald- 
well. 



Features 9 



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Locals Only 



The Many Places KHS Students Can Be Found 



Although we all know that tourists 
greatly benefit the commonwealth 
of Virginia Beach, the citizens of Virginia 
Beach, especially those who go to Kemps- 
ville High, tend to agree that some places 
should be exclusively inhabitted by the na- 
tives. Many Kempsville students can be 
found at these so called "Hangouts" or 
"Joints". 

Some people might think that "The 
Beach" is just a tourist attraction; little do 
they know that Past Atlantic Avenue to the 
sand and ocean is Kempsville territory. 
Sure — during the summer season there 
may be an overwhelming amount of tour- 
ists, but KHS students can be found there 
all year round. 

At the beginning of the year, the Nep- 



tune Festival was held down at the beach. 
The Kempsville students left their marks 
by sculpting sand into a train. This train 
was recorded in the Guiness Book of World 
Records. 

The number of surfers may fade as the 
seasons change and as the weather and 
water get colder, but there are a few surf 
ers that just cannot seem to quit. 

Lynnhaven Mall is another popular 
place where KHS students go. One can 
spend all day at Lynnhaven Mall because 
of the variety of stores and restaurants. 

KHS students can be found almost any- 
place. You can be sure, though, that those 
places are not any old hangout. They are 
home territory for the Chiefs. 











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Lynnhaven Mall with its numerous stores and restau- 
rants is a common place to find Kempsville students 
during their spare time. 



Exhibiting his talent for surfing, a KHS student rides 
the waves in the waters at Virginia Beach. 

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Many students enjoyed the annual festivities of the Neptune Festival. 

Kempsville students participated in the Neptune Festival by building a train sand 
sculpture. A record of its length was entered in The Guiness Book of World 
Records. 



Common browsing places for Kempsville students down at the beach are the surf 
shops. 



Features/ 1 I 



I 



We've Got Spirit 



Students Prepare For Homecoming 

In order to prepare students for Homecoming by stimulating 
school pride, the SCA sponsored Spirit Week, which took place 
the week of October 1014. The first day of Spirit Week was Hat 
Day, on which students displayed their tastes in hat apparel. 
Baseball caps and Kempsville Chiefs painter caps were just few of 
the many types of hats to be seen riding atop the heads of 
students in the halls between bells. Students dressed up as cow- 
boys and Indians on Tuesday, which was Western Day. On 
Wednesday, the hands of the clock were turned back as students 
relived the past on Roaring Twenties Day. On Disney Day, stu- 
dents portrayed their favorite Disney characters. Numerous pairs 
of Mickey Mouse ears were seen scurrying about the school. They 
were accompanied by many of Mickey's friends, such as Goofy, 
Donald Duck, and Minnie Mouse. The events of the week leading 
to Homecoming climaxed on Fired Gp Chiefs Day, which follov-ed 
Thursday night's festive bonfire. On the last day of Spirit Week, 
students were rewarded with fireballs when they approached a 
cheerleader and said, "Get fired up Chiefs! " Spirit week proved to 
be successful, for by the end of the day, students were more than 
ready for the evening's football game and Homecoming ceremo 
nies. 




II 




Sarah Fussel rewards enthusiastic fans with fireballs on Fired (Jp Chiefs Day 



Tammy Werblskis and [^bbie Baxter bring the wild and wcxily West to the halls of 
Kempsville. 



12/Features 




Kris Worrell, Annice Hirt, Angle Adkins, Fred Lentz, and Maureen Bastek don their 
favorite "chapeaux" on Hat Day 



Minnie and Mickey Mouse, Michelle Brinn and Steve Butcher, check the informa- 
tion board for the days agenda in Disney Land. 




In his argyle sweater, bow tie, and cap. Grant Staff displays the dress of the 
Roaring Twenties. 



Spirit Week/ 13 



[ 



** Reflections Of Yesterday 



jj 



Homecoming Proves To Be Another Success 



Homecoming is one of the major events taking place in the 
Fall. The Homecoming Queen is chosen, the classes com 
pete against each other in a float competition, and all the seniors 
who graduated the previous year return to visit and reminisce 
about their high school years. 

This year the Homecoming Court consisted of Sophomore Prin- 
cesses, Stephanie Bannevich, Rebecca Jones, and Debbie Rozos; 
Junior Princesses, Laura D'Antonio, Elizabeth Jenkins, and Missy 
Grehawick; Senior Princesses, Alana Mateling, Brenda Radidoux, 
Susan Slaughter, Carrie West, and Courtney Zierden. The Home 
coming Queen, voted on by the student body Friday, October 14, 
was announced at the game. The crowd awaited with anticipation 
as Carrie West was announced and crowned Queen. 

The Chiefs played Cox at Homecoming and with the support of 
the fans and the cheerleaders, defeated them 37-6. This victory 



gave the Chiefs a 70 record. 

The float competition, a dominating factor in Homecoming, 
provided the opportunity for the classes to prove which is the 
best. The theme for Homecoming was "Reflections of Yesterday". 
The Senior float was a steamship, the Juniors' — a rockinghorse, 
and the Sophomores" — baby blocks. Each class float was indi- 
vidual and designed with care. They all reflected the theme in a 
variety of ways. The Juniors proved theri superiority by winning 
the competition. 

The Homecoming dance, which was held in the gym after the 
game, ended this memorable night. The enchanting Homecoming 
court and their handsome escorts graced the dance floor along 
with the many love struck couples who danced until the morning 
hours. 




I 



After winning Homecoming Queen. Carrie West excitedly accepts her crown from 
Mr Caldwell 



The Homecoming Court; Rebecca Jones. Debbie Rozos. Stephanie Bannevu h. 
Alana Maleling. Brenda Rabidoux, Queen Carrie West, Susan Slaughter. Courtney 
Zierden, Laura D Antonio. Missy Grehawick, and Elizabeth Jenkins 



1 4/ Features 




Drum Majorette Brenda Jones expertly conducts the band during the half 
time show 





Homecoming/ 1 5 



Showtime! 



A Lesson In Human Nature 

This fall's drama production was a comedy about a family 
and the ordeals it undergoes to survive life by the skin of 
their teeth. In fact the play, written by Thorton Wilder is entitled 
"The Skin of Our Teeth. " 

The production which was performed on October 20-22, de- 
manded a fairly large cast including refugees, tap dancers, tour- 
ists, the animals of Noah's ark, and soldiers. Major roles were 
played by Teta Barry as Sabina the maid, Scott Clark as Mr. 
George Antrobus, Christine Sell as Mrs. Maggie Antrobus, Steve 
Scrabbits as Henry Antrobus, and Robin Jaffe as Gladys Antro 
bus. All in all "The Skin of Our Teeth " was quite an involved 
production. It even contained two blue-haired singing muses. 

The play was written to actually occur in any given time frame. 
It is a comedy, but it maintains a rather serious theme; human 
survival. In the play the characters must face Nature's threat in 
the form of an ice age during Act I. In Act II, George Antrobus is in 
conflict with himself when he must decide which woman he really 
loves, his wife or his attractive maid. Then in Act III, man is 
against man during the "Great War, " and a father's will is pitted 
against the will of his strong-minded son. However, the final 
outcome is successful, and even though the play was difficult to 
perform and parts were a bit confusing, the excellent acting talent 
made the play a huge success. In Scott Clark's opinion, "It was a 
tough show to perform because of its comic approach to the 
heavy subject matter, yet I believe the actors did their best with 
the complicated theme and carried off a good show " 




George Antrobus (Scott Clark) commands Sa 
bina (Teta Barry) to pass sandwiches to the 
hungry refugees. 



A rclu< \rii\\ Maggie Antrobus (Chribtine Sell) 
shows no reaction to the enthusiastic broad 
cast offi( mI. pl<)ye<J by Rrian Cook 




1 6/ Features 




Angry refugees try to stop George Antrobus 
(Scott Clark) from putting out the fire, while 
Mrs. Antrobus (Christine Sell) explains why he 
should keep the fire burning. 




Maggie Antrobus (Christine Sell) and Sabina 
(Teta Barry) try to keep out an intruder, played 
by Chris Dinsmore. 



After the "Great War", George Antrobus 
(Scott Clark) explains to the other soldiers how 
important life is. 



Fall Play/ 1 7 



On My Honor 

Responsibility Week Promotes Student 
Involvement And School Pride 

As a followup of the newly adopted Honor Code, the SCA 
sponsored a Student Responsibility Week from September 
19-23. The week was designed to make Kempsville a better 
school, to bring about student pride and spirit, and to promote 
maximum student involvement. 

The week began with "Truth or Consequences Day" on Mon- 
day. The three class assemblies were held in which the students 
viewed the movie, "Together," and were told the purposes of 
Responsibility Week. An essay contest on "What the Honor Code 
Means to Me" was also sponsored. 

Buttons were distributed on Tuesday, "Pet Peeves Day." Each 
students was to express his personal pet peeve by writing it on his 
button. A grafitti board on which the students could express 
themselves was also set up in the cafeteria that day. 

On Wednesday, "Alcatraz Day," students were to come to 
school dressed as criminals. Vandalism posters were hung 
throughout the school, and the students attended an assembly 
held by two Virginia Beach officers. The policemen made the 
students aware of their responsibilities, not only to the school, but 
to the law and themselves. 

Bumper stickers and keychains were sold on "Show That Pride 
Day" and the cafeteria was separated into the three class sections 
to determine the most spirited class. 

The week ended with "Sportsmanship Day." The pep rally and 
the class Olympics effectively promoted school and class spirit, as 
well as student involvement. The events at the class Olympics 
included tugof war, water balloon volleyball, find-thetarget, Mr. 
Betty Crocker, and many more. 

Many students and teachers alike felt that the project was well 
worth the effort and time put into its development. The Student 
Responsibility Week succeeded in emphasizing the Honor Code, 
personal integrity, and student involvement. 




Craig Hudson gets the "feel of things" while pljying Find the Target 



Skip Davis helps lead the junior class to victory by placing his spirit tjb in the 
suggestion box. 



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I8/Fe«tures 






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helle Mauney and Jeff Darrah. along with other tuggers. show their support 
the senior class 



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Fred Lentz and Bryan Foley, the premiere chefs at 
Kempsville, demonstrate their "Mr Betty Crocker" 
expertise. 

The senior class quickly discovers it takes teamwork 
to win at water balloon volleyball. 



Responsibility Week/ 19 



A Taste Of The Good Life 



Kempsville's '^Melting Pot" Stirs Up Spirit 



The various people and their distinct personalities constitute 
Kempsville High School's "melting pot" which is connposed 
of athletes, "brains", talents, and leaders. This "melting pot" not 
only contains the many attributes of each student but also repre- 
sents the pride of Kempsville High School. 

Kempsville's "melting pot" is comprised of many who are 
noted for certain abilities and achievements. The many athletes, 
their faces cringing with determination, persevere in their at- 
tempts to reach the peak of triumph. The "brains" are those who 
work diligently in their studies, striving to uphold the academic 
excellence of Kempsville High School and consequently earning 




Paige Kelly carefully plans how she is going to sketch a mechanical drawi 



ng 



the "grade". The talents are gifted with the unique ability to 
express themselves, whether it be through art, the performing 
arts, or music. Endeavoring to preserve the utmost standards of 
Kempsville High School, the leaders are those who organize activi- 
ties and encourage support among the student body. 

However, the most significant ingredient in Kempsville's "melt- 
ing pot " is every individual's sense of pride and spirit. Students 
who devote laughter and good cheer to Kempsville High School 
are the most essential ingredients to the "melting pot", for they 
are the ones who 'add a little spice to life ". 






20/Features 




The Kempsville soccer team and held hockey learn strive to achieve one major 
goal — to be number one. 



"Do you remember when Elizabeth Barrliff. Michelle Morris. Mary Rutt, and Chris 
Wunderly share stories over lunch describing their individual experiences and 
moments as juniors and seniors at Kempsville High?" 




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The many smiling faces depict the true spirit of Kempsville High — the most 
essential ingredient in Kempsville's "melting pot " 



Inundated with numbers and figures. Donnie Jones displays his accounting skills. 



Features/21 



Joe Tinkler — Tom Cruise — they both make All the 
Right Moves. 



Beth Pendleton sitting pretty as Jennifer Beals in 
Flashdance. 





Tunes And Flicks 



Prime Entertainment For Students Of Kempsville 



At Kempsville High School, movies and music play an im- 
portant part in the social lives of the students. Dates, 
outings with the gang, and moments spent alone are generally 
accompanied by listening to music or a trip to the movies. 

The music that was popular this year varied greatly. With the 
dance music of Michael Jackson's Thriller. David Bowie's Let's 
Dance, the soundtrack of Flashdance, and Prince's 1999. students 
found a way to dance the night away. The hard rockers of the 
student body had Def Leppard's Pyromania and Quiet Riot's 
Metal Health to rock to. The more mellow members of KHS tuned 
in to Hall and Gates' H20. Culture Club's Kissing to be Clever, Men 
at Work's Business as Usual, Journey's Frontiers, and Lionel 
Richie's newest solo release of the same name. Students also 
spoke out against war with the social commentary tracks of the 



Clash's Combat Rock and U2's War. 

The movies of the year also varied in theme, ranging from 
lighthearted teenage comedies to the blood and gore of horror 
flicks. The box office smashes, according to Kempsville's mem 
bers, ranged from Risky Business, Class, and Vacation, to the Big 
Chill. Terms of Endearment, and Christine. Adventure lovers 
spent their hard-earned dollars to experience the long-awaited 
Return of the Jedi and the latest James Bond film, /Vever Say 
Never Again. The Outsiders, All the Right Moves, and Flashdance 
also topped the hit list. 

Tunes and flicks affect the lives of Kempsville students daily. 
The movies seen and the music heard express our feelings and 
entertain us. They compose a large part of the everyday life of 
students here at KHS. 



22/ Features 



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Billy Maul masquerades as Michael Jackson on the 
album cover Thriller. 



Vinnie Chiusano as an Innocent Man for Billy Joe. 




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/ ^~s / Entertainment/23 



18 Years Ago 



Seniors And School Celebrate 
Eighteenth Anniversary 

When you hear the year 1966 mentioned, do you think 
primarily of ancient history? Lyndon B. Johnson, hippies, 
and Vietnam; do these names ring a bell? Nationally, the year of 
1966 was important; the United States was deeply embroiled in 
the Vietnam conflict. America was scarred by rioting, and the 
Beatles were the group to listen to. Locally, the year 1966 marked 
the birth of a high school, as well as the birth of several hundred 
special people. The high school, of course, was Kempsville, and 
the people were those students who will be celebrating their 
eighteenth birthday with the school. 

Yes, the year 1984 serves as a monumental year for both the 
seniors and Kempsville High School; it marks their eighteenth 
anniversary. To the building, 1984 just means another year of 
housing sophmores, juniors, and seniors, and providing them with 
the facilities needed for a good education. To the senior, it means 
much more, because 1984 will represent the student's last year at 
Kempsville. 

The years between those eighteen years were important to both 
the school and the student. They both grew as the years pro- 
gressed. The school went through many changes, including the 
addition of the "700 hall" to the building, and the addition of 
bleachers to the athletic field. To the student, these years repre- 
sented stages in each of their individual lives. 

This will be the only time that the age of Kempsville High 
School will be parallel to the age of its senior class; this is why the 
years of 1966 and 1984 are so special. Hopefully, those who 
graduate in 1984 will remember how special they are, and how 
unique Kempsville High School is. 





-t 






II 



In 1Q66. I yndon R Johnson was serving his first full term as President 



The year 1966 marked the increase of American forces in Vietnam. 



24/Features 



Eighteen years ago. Beatlemania rocked its way through America 



« 



Brandon Sutherland in 1966 




Features/25 



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— Wieni^ftp Aquino slain 

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^nt Responsibility Week 
piympics 
Lover Boy in concert 
Soviets attack Korean airliner 

— Neptune Festival 

— Underclassmen pictures taken 



October 

— Spirit Week 

— Grenada invasion 

— Beirut massacre 

— Homecoming — Queen: Carrie 
West 

— Skin of Our Teeth 

— Juniors order class rings 

— PSAT's 

— World Series won by Baltimore 
Orioles 



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November 

— Football District Title 

— Local elections 

— Space shuttle launch 

— Bomb blasts Capitol 

— Temporary class ranks 

— The Day After 






26/ Features V. 



December 

— Canned food drive 

— State championship football 
game 

— Navy Lt. Robert Goodman shot 
down by Syria 

— U.S. withdraws from Grenada 

— Treaty door decorating contest 

— Congressman William 
Whitehurst speaks to seniors 

— 4,000 PLO troops evacuate 
Tripoli ,.. ^ y 



II 



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nog all the glory 



January 

— Robert Goodman released by 
Syrians 

— AT & T break up 

— F & M Bank and Virginia 
National Bank form Sovra 
Bank 
Kinks in concert 

-^ Superbowl won by Los Ang 






^(H 


February 


^ 


— Winter Olympics 


1 


— Andropov dies; Chernenko 


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chosen as new Soviet leader 


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— U.S. troops leave Beirut 




— Image senior assembly 


m( 


— Police. Billy Joel, and Van 


Halen in concert 




— Seniors order caps and gowns 


1/ 


— Camelot 



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March 



— Ring dance 

— Foreign Language Week 
Peacekeeping forces leave Beirut 




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April 



— Class and SCA elections 

— Spring break 

— Youth Art Month 

— Variety Show 

— Fashion Show 






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May 

— Prom 

— A. P. exams 

— Distribution of yearbooks 

— Distribution of Montage 



June 

— Exams 

— School ends 

— Graduation 

— VACATION 



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illout from a TV At^nii 



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#■ 



Thinking Ahead 



What classes are you taking?" "Do 
you understand any of this?" 
"What is the homework?" These 
are just a few questions asked everyday at 
Kempsville High School. Academics are of 
primary importance to this school. In fact, 
Kempsville had more National Merit semi- 
finalists last year than any other school in 
Virginia Beach, and has retained a reputa- 
tion of academic excellence. Although stu- 
dents may complain about the academic 
pressures involved with being a student, 
students generally recognize that a sound 
high school education is necessary prep- 
aration for college or direct entrance into 
the job world. Guidance counselor, Ms. 



Powell, commented on the academic excel 
lence of Kempsville High School. "Kemps 
ville's students perform extremely well on 
the advanced placement exams. Most AP 
students receive college credit; many of 
them recieve the highest grade possible on 
the exam. Kempsville High School also is 
the only school in the Beach having had a 
million-dollar graduating class. "Million dol- 
lar" refers to the amount of scholarship or 
college appropriated money received by 
the senior class." 

Nothing can stop the dreaded KHS ex- 
amination or homework "headache", but, 
perhaps, the reassurance of receiving an 
excellent education will lessen the pain. 




4 



M 




During a special education class, Mrs Hendley aid! 
one of her many grateful students 



28/ Divider 



During his free bell. Mr St Laurent is often seen 
going over a computer program on one of his ma 
chines 



Independent Living proves to be a strain on its stu 
dents as Mrs Nimmo goes over the day's lessons 









Academics/29 




The /Modern English In Action textbook does not be 
lonq at the bottom of the pile 



In order to develop listening comprehension, these 
students use the foreign language headphones 



A studious Chief, Joe Johnson, invests the necessary 
time in reading his Western Literature book. 



30/ Academics 



Subjects To Broaden The Horizons 



Zolleges Compel Students To Enroll In Academic Classes 



Reading, writing, and arithnnetic, oth 
erwise known as readin' ritin' and 
ithmetic, are the basic skills our grand- 
arents learned in school. Now the student 
i required to take five years of English and 
t least three years of Social Studies, 
/hich consist of World History or World 
iieography, US and VA History, and (JS 
nd VA Government. Also a student 
jhould consider at least two or three years 
f a foreign language in order to acquire 
||tie necessary skills of listening, reading, 
/riting, and speaking of that language. 
Although foreign languge is not a re- 
uired high school course, most colleges 

Ijquire at least two years of a foreign lan- 
uage. Some students take a language be- 
ause they want or need another elective 
redit. As a fifth year French student The- 
;sa Fletcher explains, "The reason I took 
rench for five years is for colleges. Most 
chools require two or three years, but tak- 
ig five years shows your interest and tal- 



ent in a foreign language. (Jp until now in 
French, there has been a lot of grammar. 
But now, everything is coming together 
and it is pretty interesting." 

Could you prepare your own income tax- 
es? After taking the GS/Virginia Govern- 
ment course this seemingly impossible 
task would be relatively easy. Government 
develops your knowledge of how and why 
the government works. Although govern- 
ment is a required course, it can be fun and 
interesting. In what other class do Kemps- 
ville students hold mock trials or visit a 
real trial or even a session of Congress? 
Where else, but your own government 
class? Mrs. Peterson, department chairper- 
son, said, "Students need to become better 
informed citizens. They need to know what 
their government can do for them and 
what it can't." 

English offers students the opportunity 
to become proficient readers and writers. 
Both of these skills will be very important 



in a student's future career. In his five 
years of English, a student will learn many 
skills that can be used in other classes or at 
a place of employment. Term papers writ- 
ten in both eleventh and twelfth grade will 
benefit the student at college where two 
term papers are due each semester. In Sen- 
ior English, resumees are written. These 
are only a few examples of the interesting 
things students do in English. Some Eng- 
lish teachers help students learn to per- 
form in front of a crowd by assigning oral 
reports or skits. Students must realize the 
need for all of the types of communication 
that are a part of English. Mrs. Kolb, de- 
partment chairperson, said, "Only those 
who cultivate these communication skills 
will succeed in today's technological soci- 
ety." 

The skills developed in foreign lan- 
guage, social studies and English are nec- 
essary for the complete education of the 
Kempsville student. 




Mrs. Pindur conducts a class discussion in her fifth 
year German class. 



Mr. Picillo explains the concept of limited govern- 
ment to his class. 



Humanities/31 



It All Adds Gp 



Math And Science Courses Are A Perfect Solution. 



The science and math courses are de- 
signed to instill a desire to learn 
about technology, and to develop scientific 
and mathmatical thinking. 

The science courses consist of ecology, 
biology, chemistry, and physics. Ecology 
develops the understanding and awareness 
of the environment, problems, and chal- 
lenges the student will face in the years 
ahead. Biology assists students in under- 
standing the living world about them. 
Chemistry develops skills on working in a 
laboratory. It also develops a better under- 
standing of chemicals, matter, and their 
changes. Physics helps the students gain a 
better understanding of energy, its forms, 
and how it can be transferred. When asked 
why she was taking physics, Carrie West 
replied, "Because ! like math and science. 
It is a combination of the two." 

Computer science lies between math 
and science. It enables the student to be- 
come familiar with computers and their 
operations. 

The math courses range from general 
math to advanced placement calculus. 
They cover the many different levels of 
math a student may need. General math 
deals with the basics of math. Elementary 
Algebra parts one and two break Algebra 
into a two year course. Geometry helps the 
student become aware of the properties of 
shapes and theorems. Algebra I through 
Algebra II, introduces equations and car- 
ries one step farther than geometry. Analy- 
sis develops the idea of analizing the prob- 
lems and then, completing it the quickest 
way. 

The courses are all aimed at the prepara- 
tion for college, and the problems the stu 
dent may be faced with later in life. 



32/ Academics 




Mr. Pontj explains the simple reasoning bf-him) Ihi 
direct proof in geometry 





Although it takes many hours to devise a simple 
program, Steve Kanter quickly and efficiently cor- 
rects his errors on the computer terminal. 



Using the microscope is one of the most interesting 
activities performed in Biology class. One discovers 
the totally different world of such microorganisms 
like protoplasm and algae. 




Math And Sciences/33 



Future Enterprisers 



Students Get Training Early 



One of the few programs in high 
school that trains students for the 
working world is the business department. 
While subjects such as math and English 
provide students with general knowledge, 
business courses such as typing and ste- 
nography train students directly for jobs in 
which they need these skills. 

"I know I'll need to type no matter what I 
do, " says Harold Davis, "so I took Typing 
I." These sentiments express the attitude 
of many typing students who dislike typing 
but need the skill. 

Subjects such as accounting and stenog- 
raphy give student more concentrated ca- 
reer training. The department head of busi- 
ness. Miss Gavin, reveals the purpose of 
Kempsville's business program, "To devel- 
op, leadership qualities, and encourage 
knowledge and skill in business." 

Twenty-nine Kempsville students are in- 
volved in a Cooperative Office Education 
program in conjuncton with their training 




This is not the ancient script of Egypt, but a modern 
business script called short hand 



at school. In the program, participants ac- 
tually work in the business field and earn 
wages using the skills they learned at 
Kempsville. Each student receives one 
high school credit, as well as a salary 
which is usually higher than minimum 
wage. In order to earn a high school credit, 
students must use the office skills when 
working for businesses such as doctors, 
realtors, banks and even the Busch Corpo- 
ration. 

rSew computers are a welcome addition 
to the business program. In order to keep 
pace with modern business techniques, the 
department requires computers. Miss Ga- 
vin says that these computers help to mod- 
ernize ihe program. 

While some students go to business col- 
lege and others enter the business field 
directly, all who participate in Kemps- 
ville's business program gain knowlege in- 
valuable to their future business careers. 



34/ Academics 




Student's fingers fumble through the strange key 
board of the typewriter. 



Eager student toys with new business computers, 
bought to expand Kempsville's business program 



Miss Allen runs off another dreaded typing test 



Nothing escapes the perceptive glances of Mrs Mat 
teson, as students labor through an Accounting test. 



%. 







Business/35 



1 



From Sawing 



Industrial Arts Develop Their Skills 

Hey, that board is the wrong size!" 
"This drawing is due at the end of 
the bell." "Can I borrow your pliers?" 

Sound familiar? If it is, then you are one 
of the many students who are involved in 
the world of Industrial Arts. This field 
ranges from designing your own dream 
house, inventing an electronic gadget, to 
building a coffee table. 

Industrial Arts is a group of skills that 
require the use of machines, tools and in- 
dustrial materials. This program which is 
taught at Kempsville High School includes 
courses in electronics, graphic arts, indus- 
trial crafts, mechanical drawing, metal- 
working plastics, and woodworking. These 
many courses have an important part in a 
person's general instructions. Whatever 
course a student plans to take, he will be in 
an atmosphere much like that of a profes- 
sional. 

Kempsville Industrial Arts Staff allows 
the students the freedom to do their own 
work with teacher supervision. This dedi- 
cated staff consists of Mr. Cochran, Mr. 
Parham, Mr. Stankus, Mr. Sydow, and Mr. 
Zadell 

Brian Morris, an engineering drawing 
student, replied, "Industrial Arts prepares 
a young person in dealing with the outside 
world and to find an area that he will en 
joy." There is a bright future for any per- 
son taking Industrial Arts, for he has 
learned the basic skills for modern technol 

ogy 



During a bell of metalworking, Ernest Retlkis and 
Kevin Marcum work cooperatively to saw a lead pipe 



In order to fit fiis project perfectly Bill B,iily ruts a 
piece of plywood to size. 





Jo Ann Griqgs prepares to drill a hole tfiroucjh a pici ( 
)t plywoiHi behind .1 p.iir of i)oi)i)les 



J6/ A< ademic's 



To Sewing 



Home Ec Teaches Home Life Skills 




Another area of study that builds a 
person's skill is Home Econonnics. 
This wide field provides a student with the 
opportunity to deal with and solve home 
life problems. The many students who are 
involved learn how to dress comfortably 
while still in style, have a better diet, care 
for their homes, and cope with family prob- 
lems. Many skills are developed such as 
cooking, getting along with people, and the 
budgeting of time and money. 

Many begin with the basic course Con- 
sumer and Homemaking to find what field 
they are interested in. They then may 
branch out into the many fields open to 
them such as clothing management, interi- 
or decorating, marriage and the family, 
food management, and independent living. 

Kempsville High School's Home Eco- 
nomics staff consisting of Mrs. Nimno and 
Mrs. Sanoba provides the students with 
the materials and teaching that is essential 
to have a future in Home Economics. 




Chef Joe Tinkler prepares to flip a hot cake as a 
customer waits impatiently to down the scrumptious 
delight. 



Scott Whittier tries desperately to remove the stain 
on a clothing before he lets the washing machine do 
the rest of the work 



Practical Arts/ 37 



Career Oriented Students 



Learning Trades For Tomorrow 



CDC and Votech are two programs 
offered to the students of KHS who 
wish to study particular trades and acquire 
special job skills. The many courses are 
designed to prepare students for employ- 
ment in a field that best suits them. Tracy 
Lavely, a Votech student at KHS said, "I 
took Votech because it trains a person 
enough to get a job straight from high 
school. In my case it is a $17,000 a year 
job." 

Vocational courses are offered as half- 
day programs consisting of a morning ses- 
sion and an afternoon session. The morn- 
ing students meet at KHS at 7:50 and then 
take a school bus to Votech. At 1 1:00 the 
bus returns the students to the school. The 
students then attend their fifth and sixth 
bells. The afternoon students attend their 
first three bells at the school. During fourth 
bell the students eat lunch, then leave for 
Votech. 

All courses emphasize the teaching of 



marketable skills at the job entry level. The 
courses are competency based and ar- 
ranged in learning modules. Students leave 
the program at the completion of a module 
with certified competencies to seek full- 
time employment. Some of these courses 
include plumbing, floral design, auto ser- 
vicing, electricity, and data processing. A 
student can acquire college credit for fin- 
ishing a vocational course. For example, if 
a student completes Data Processing for 
two years and passes the college exam, he 
will receive college credit from whatever 
college he chooses. 

What are the major advantages in being 
involved with CDC or Votech? One stu- 
dent replied, "It is good training. Votech 
looks good on applications to colleges and 
job applications. Students also get to meet 
students from other schools." So one can 
see, attending CDC and Votech can be a 
profitable experience in more ways than 
one. 





A fellow student allows herself to t>e tfie guinea pig as 
Debbie Fleenor practices her nnakeup applying tech- 
niques. 



38/ Academics 



Brad Gram, an astute Votech student, operates the 
printing machine, as he considers a future in journal- 
ism. 



In welding class, sparks fly as Jim Murphy and Swain 
Eller weld the metal pif>e. 







■I 


^jsM 


H 




, «i 





In a Votech cosmetology class. Candy Kinard learns 
to cut hair. 




h CDC/39 



The AP Challenge 



The Demands Of An Advanced Placement Course 



Every year many students of Kemps- 
ville High School face the challenge 
of an advanced placement course. Why do 
students choose to take an AP course, and 
what opportunities are available for those 
students who last through a year of time- 
consuming studies? 

Many students claim that they need to 
learn how to study. In some cases an aver- 
age class does not present a challenge for 
superior students. Jeff Perry states, "I was 
recommended to take AP History." Dana 
McBride, another AP student, feels that 
taking an AP course can lead to opportuni- 
ties in a future career. 

All the AP teachers share a positive atti- 
tude of the opportunities given by an AP 



course. Mrs. Bonney, teacher of AP Calcu- 
lus, reasons, "The students sacrifice a lot 
of things for their studies, but they receive 
valuable skills in return. They learn how to 
study, and even if they do not receive col- 
lege credit, they face a great advantage in 
higher studies." 

Miss Osborne, AP English teacher, adds, 
"The students learn to use sources they 
did not know existed. They also learn how 
to write — a skill valued in almost every 
course." 

When asked why they decided to teach 
an AP course, the AP teachers' opinions 
were best summed up by AP History teach- 
er Mr. Mitchell's words, "I like the chal- 
lenge " 





Many intense discussions take place during AP Eng 
lish. Bruce Spiva is contemplating over a counter 
attack on Leslie Shapiro's quick remarks 



Another day of lectures. The AP History class Strug 
gles through the centuries encountering good times 
and bad times in their preparations for the AP exami 
nation 



During the struggles through head splitting Calculus 
problems. Mrs Bonney can frequently be seen ex 
plaining difficult mathematical concepts on the black- 
board. 



40/ Academics 




Miss Osborne discusses a poem explication with AP Tom Infantino strives for a headstart in the Marines 

student Elizabeth Tilt. An AP English student has to by putting his soul into the challenge of AP American 

spend an enormous amount of time on research and History, 
studies in preparation for the AP exam in May. 



From yellow ochre to coeruleum blue, Tim Garza, an 
AP Art student, uses his talent to combine a million 
colors, creating another wonder of mankind. 



AP Courses/41 



1 







Vicki Chaflin stares intensely at her weaving so as not 
to miss a single stitch 







42/Academlc8 





Brown Pelican" — Jeff Edney 



■Readme) Madonna" — Susie Hoskins 



A.P. 



44 



A"rt *T"eople 



A.P. Art Students Work Hard To Earn Credit 



Kempsville High School has been 
known to have many successful 
and dedicated artists, and this year proved 
to be no exception. Many art shows and 
exhibits were entered as hours of hard 
work were put in order to produce an origi- 
nal art piece. The Advanced Art classes 
also worked furiously throughout the year 
to present their ideas of art to the College 
Entrance Board. 

Gnder the guidance of Ms. Robin Clair, 
the A.P. class prepared their work to be 
interpreted by the Board while they re- 



cieved college credit. The students also 
entered their artwork in the Neptune Festi- 
val, Youth Art Show, the YWCA. 1984 Stu 
dent Gallery, and the annual Kempsville 
Art Show. Many first, second, and third 
place finishes were displayed as Kemps 
ville dominated many of these shows. 

The students were kept busy by plan 
ning a trip to the Mariner's and Chrysler 
Museum in order to study the techniques 
of past artists such as Picasso, Monet, Ren- 
ior, and Goya. The students also designed 
post cards with their original work in order 



to study the commercial art field. Much of 
their art works were also displayed in the 
annual Montage literary magazine. 

Sculptures, painting, drawings, and oth- 
er media form were constructed by these 
dedicated students to keep the field of fine 
arts alive while enjoying the many wonders 
and mysteries of various art forms. Kemps- 
ville students continue to keep this tradi- 
tion visualizing themselves as future art- 
ists. 









4 


4 




1' 


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^ 


w 



'Bridge Over Trouble Water " — Nannette Cullom 



Light Effects " — Ginger Hayes 



Tim Garza, an A.P. student, prepares to take a picture 
of his work in order to present it to the College En 
trance Board. 



Rod Annet chips away at his sculpture to smooth out 
the rough surfaces. 



A.P. Art/43 



44/Divider 




i 



l» 



Smile Everyone! 



Kempsville High School is, in itself, a 
unique society. The administration 
is composed of four qualified individuals 
who guide many aspects of school life. The 
teachers are responsible to both the stu- 
dents and the administration as they fulfill 
their obligations with pride and enthusi 
asm. By far, the largest group in the 
"Chief" society consists of the students. 
Their goal is to obtain a sound high school 
education which will prepare them for life 
after leaving KHS. These three classifica- 
tions provide for an interesting mixture at 




• S^-r 






Ui.uhfs Kfith Lowrante Jnd Judy Ni^kljb enjoy 
iheir opportunity to get outside with their students 



Kempsville High School. Furthermore, 
each group is composed of a number of 
smaller groups. For example, there are a 
variety of students at Kempsville, ranging 
from the all-around sportsman to the Bin 
stein "think alike." Kempsville High 
School is composed of a variety of indivi- 
duals — whether they be administrators, 
teachers, students, office workers, or li- 
brary workers. These "faces" constitute 
the "Chief" society, supplying it originality 
and distinctiveness. 



■^i. 






Sports/45 




Top Of The Totem Pole 



The principal of a school is responsible 
for all aspects of the total school pro- 
gram including instruction, discipline, cafe- 
teria, maintenance of building and 
grounds, athletic program, finance, guid- 
ance, school organizations, student activi- 
ties, and public relations. Many of these 
responsibilities and duties are delegated to 
assistants and other personnel, but in the 
final analysis, the principal must assume 
responsibility for every aspect of school 
operations. 

During his fifth year at Kempsville High 
School, Mr. Caldwell undertook all of these 
responsibilities with the aid of assistant 
principals Shirley Rountree, Louis Tonel 
son, and Joseph Hassell. Mr. Caldwell has 
a great interest in and can be found in 
attendance at numerous school activities 
whether they be football games, band con 
certs, or school plays. He is deeply in 
volved with and has an understanding of 
the students of KHS, which can be credited 
to his fifteen years experience in various 



Chiefs In Distinction 

administrations and the personal upbring- 
ing of his three, now adult, children. 

Also returning from last years adminis- 
trative staff were assistant principals Shir- 
ley Rountree and Louis Tonelson, Ms. 
Rountree assumed the responsibilities of 
coordinating all registration and assisting 
in the scheduling process. She is actively 
involved in the total school program. Mr. 
Tonelson assigned room keys, schedule fa 
cilities used by school groups and out of 
school organizations, and supervised 
school plant maintenance and cleanliness. 
All three assistants maintained order of 
school grounds, in corriders, restrooms 
and the cafeteria; and were responsible for 
an effective substitute teacher program, 
instructional equipment and materials. 
The assistant principals also assumed oth- 
er duties as deemed necessary by the prin- 
cipal. The entire staff played an important 
role in keeping Kempsville High School the 
number one school in Virginia Beach. 



Superinlendent. Dr F. E Bnckell 



46/ Faces 



Principal, Charles C. Caldwell 




■ 




(^ 



V 



c. 



N. 



**.*•-.• 



Joining the tribal chiefs of Kempsville 
High School this year was assistant 
principal Joseph Hassell. Mr. Hassell is ori- 
gonally from Virginia. He attended Virginia 
State College, Hampton Institute, and Old 
Dominion Gniversity where he obtained 
BS, MS, and CAS degrees. Mr. Hassell has 
previously taught Industrial Electronics 
and Electricity courses at Norfolk State 
College. 

As an administrator at KHS, Mr. Hassell 
dealt with discipline, student attendance, 
and supervision of the departments. He 
would like to see each student attending 
KHS working to the best of his ability. Mr. 
Hassell believes that Kempsville High 
School has potential "to be one of the best 
schools in Virginia Beach or perhaps the 
best!" 



Assistant Principal, Louis Tonelson 



Administration/47 



Senior Anna Walker discusses her future with her 
guidance counselor. Mr Reid 




Tim Albert — (J S History: World Geography; 

Baseball; Football 

Judy Allen — Stenography 2; Typing 1. 2; 

General Business; FBLA 

Sharon Archbell — Guidance Counselor; BAS ICS 

Parker Baine — Biology; tcology 



Cynthia Baker — 1 earning Disabilities 

TeeGay Barkley — Office Secretary 

Charia Baucom — tiem. Algebra Part 2; 

Geometry 




ii 



\tk: 



III 

1 I 

'1 



48/ Faces 



Need Assistance? 



Guidance And General Offices Provide It 



y^ 



Here is a group of people who are a 
necessity to Kempsville's success. 
These men and women work in the General 
Office and the Guidance Office and per- 
form a remarkable service for our school. 

Besides merely answering the tele- 
phones of Kempsville High School, the 
General Office secretaries perform many 
deeds that benefit students, administra- 
tors, and patrons daily. These dedicated 
women receive guests, send information to 
the students' homes, answer questions, 
make absentee lists, sift through a moun- 
tain of paperwork, and attempt to tame 
daily traffic jams that occur in the office. 

The Guidance Office also buzzes with 
activity. The counselors help each student 
with any problem he may have. Each year, 
they meet with students to offer help in 
choosing classes, and they process hun- 
dreds of schedule changes for those stu- 
dents who drop or add classes. The coun- 
selors provide valuable career and college 
information in the resource room and on 
the college board. Scholarships are also 
periodically announced to help students 
prepare for their college education. 

The Guidance Office and General Office 
assist KHS in many ways. If you need help, 
they are there. 




Patricia Bernick — Drama 2. 3. 4; Eng. I2A; 

Thespians 

Judy Bonney — Math Analysis; Calculus; 

Dept. Chairman; National Honor Society 



Bob Braun — Librarian; Golf 

Jeanne Brobst — Algebra 2; Math Analysis; 

Analytical Geometry 



Ida Brown — Clerical Typing 1; Typing 1. 2; 

General Business 

Earl Chappell — Chemistry; Boys' Soccer 



Evans Cochran — Woods 1; Crafts 1, 2 
Rose Cohen — Office Secretary 
Dale Compton — Adaptive Gym: P.F 10 
Lori Compton — bng. lUA. lOk; SCA; ICC 
Anne Connerton — Government 



Maria Cross — Eng 11 A. 11 R 

Petra Crouch — Algebra 1; Elem. Algebra Part 

2 

Renee DeMers — Reading; Eng. lOA. 12R 

Priscllla Depew — Speech 1; Eng. lOS; 

Forensics 

Jane Dilday — Algebra 2; Geometry 



Faculty/49 



Teresa Fary — Fash. I. 2; DECA: Dept. 

Chairman 

Glenda Futch — Secretary 

Carol Futral — Student Activities Cord 

Ralph Gahagan — P E. 10. 11, 12; 

Football , Dept. Chairman 

Brenda Gregory — Librarian 



Dolores Grimstead — U.S. History; 

Sociology 1 . 2 

Jean Gulick — French 1, 2 

Donna Hall — Fash Merch 1; Dist. ED 

1. 2; DECA 

Sylvia Halloran — Span 1, 2 

William Hamlin — Elem Algebra 1, 2 



Shannon Doolittle — Span. 3. 4; 
Spanish Club: Spanish Honor Society 
Barbara Edoff — Art 
Joseph Elias — Latin 1 , 2. 3. 4. 5: Latin 

Club 




Excuses, Excuses 



Just When You Thought You'd Heard It All. 



Each year teachers hear amusing ex- 
cuses as reasons for not having 
work done and tardiness, and each year 
they think, "This is the best excuse yet." 
But every class outdoes the class before, 
and the excuses seem to get more and 
more bizarre. Here are just a few excuses 
students have used: 
Tardiness: 

— "I got stuck behind Merlin Swartzen- 
truber and Tim Freeman in the hall." 

— "My car died on Locke Lane and I had 
to run the rest of the way." 

— "My spiral notebook got caught on 
some sophomores sweater." 



— "No one woke me up at the end of last 
bell." 

No homework: 

— "My baby sister ate it." 

— "The poltergeist that lives in my house 
took it." 

— "The air conditioner sucked it up." 

— "It was on the dash of my car this 
morning and blew out the window on my 
way to school." 

So. the next time you're late for class or 
don't have your homework, try to come up 
with something your teacher hasn't heard 
already. 



I 



I 



50/ Faces 











>, 



l^ioa:^ laqql^ , ^rJ^ 



^^^ /-v^^-UiAx eo.^O r^Ck^^JU-?^ 




^OVa 



After class Mr. Ponti asks Andy Walker 
why he did not have his homework. 



Jean Harrison — Typing 1, 2; Business 
Econ ; Gen Business 
John Joanides — ICT; VICA 
Patricia Jones — Alg. 1; Probability 
Vicki Karcher — Chemistry; Science 
Club; Soph Class; Girls' Gymnastics 
Betsy Kelly — French 3. 4, 5; French 
Club 



Vernon King — Dist. Ed; DECA 

Donna Kolb — Eng. 12S. 12A; Dept. 

Chairman 

Ann Loving — Geometry; Alg. 2. 

Keith Lowrance — PE 10, It; 

Wrestling 



51/Faculty 



Coach Judi Nicklas makes sure that the girls' basketball 
team streaches out before practice. 




Ellen Maccarrone — Eng lOA, 12R 

World Lit ; Adv. Comp 

Margaret Mason — General Business 

Business Law; Typing 1. 2 

Anita Matteson — Bookkeeping 2 

Typing 1 . 2 

Phyllis McClain — Bookkeeper 

Mike McGee — Biology 



Frank McGrath — Eng 1 lA. lOA; Girls' 

Soccer. 

Joyce McNeil — Learning Disabilities 

John Mitchell — OS History; AP 

History 

Jane Moran — Guidance Counselor; 

Cheerleaders. 

Judy Nicklas — PE 10. II. 12; Field 

Hockey. Girls Basketball 



If "WM 



rmfm 




62/ Faces 




Chiefs Of Chiefs 



KHS Coaches Are Dedicated To Their Teams 



Experience, dedication, and responsi- 
bility are the qualities of a good 
coach. Although the coaches at Kemps- 
ville High school possess these important 
characteristics, they are particularly distin- 
guished by their concern for their players. 
In fact the coaches' first priority is the 
game, rather than the outcome of the 
game. 

In order to establish a healthy relation- 
ship between coaches and players, the 
coaches at KHS make a special effort to 
understand their players' capabilities and 
the players themselves. The coaches are 
more than just drill sergeants who require 



an unbelievable amount of physical endur- 
ance. They are people who care, and who 
are willing to help with problems at school 
or at home. This necessary communica- 
tion between the team and the coach pro- 
vides team unity and insures team produe- 
tivity. 

While the players at KHS are the actual 
athletic competitors, the coaches are par- 
tially responsible for each glorious victory 
or agonizing defeat. Nevertheless, the 
teams' spirit, pride, sportsmanship, and re- 
cords can largely be attributed to the dedi- 
cation of the KHS coaches. 




Iris Nimmo — Marriage & Family; Foods 1, 2; FHA; Effective 

Parenting. 

Elizabeth Oliverio — P E 10 

Carol Osborne — Eng 11 A, 12AP; Softball. 

Betty Pace — Eng 11 A, 12A. 



Robert Parham — Dept. Chrm; Woods 1. 2, 3. 
Ann Parker — Music Therory; Concert 
Steve Parker — I.S.S. 
Robin Partin — Dept. Chrm; Art 1, 2. 3. 4, 5. 



Douglas Paschall — Typing 1. 2; Bookkeeping 1. 

Nancy Pell — Secretary. 

Rena Peterson — Dept. Chrm; U.S. History 

Ann Petroff — Dept. Chrm; Spanish 2, 5; Spanish Club. 



Faculty/53 



Gerald Phelps — Geography: Key Club 

George PIccilo — G.S Government; 

Cross Country. Indoor, Outdoor Track; 

Young Life 

LIsette Piccilo — Eng 12A. lOA 



Nancy PIndur — German 15; German 

Club 
Ellen Pitt — Algebra 2; Math Analysis 

B iith Pleasants — Eng llA. 12S 

Jim Ritter — Psychology 1. 2; hootball 



Vi Poff — Nurse 

Katherine Poindexter — Eng lOR, llA 

Richard Ponti — Geometry; General 

Math 
Carolyn Powell — Trade and Industry; 

ICT 



Ellen Powell — Guidance Counselor 

Carmen Reade — Chemistry; Physics 

Roy Reid — Guidance Counselor 

Katy Reilly — Guidance Counselor 



Janet Ritter — Biology 

Celia Robnett — Eng lOS, lOA; Image 

Ron Rogerson — Eng lOA, 12S 

I inda Reusch — Math Analysis; 

Geometry; Sr class advisor 




54/ Faces 



I 




Mountains 
And Valleys 

Why Teachers Teach 

Nights making out lesson plans and 
weekends grading hundreds of pa- 
pers cause teachers to ask, "Why become 
a teacher?" Ditto machines that chew up 
quizzes and filmstrips that break also 
cause teachers to ask, "Why become a 
teacher?" Someone has to do it. And be- 
sides, there are many positive aspects. 
Each new year brings promising students, 
possibilities, and dreams. There is a defi- 
nite satisfaction in making a difference in a 
person's future and watching those you 
first met as students grow into individuals 
who graduate into the world. 

Teachers believe that watching high 
school students develop throughout the 
school year is interesting and educational. 
Some teachers even feel that seniors care 
about the society of which they are going 
to be contributing members. 

According to Mrs. Connerton, "Teach- 
ing is certainly a career with many peaks 
and valleys, but I am very glad to be able to 
say that it has been one of deep satisfac- 
tion for me." 



Mr. Paschall takes a long awaited break after a long 
hard day at school. 



Cindy Sanoba — Independant Living: 
Clothing 1, 2; Interior Decorating; FHA 
Ronald Scott — Orchestra; Advanced 
Band; Marching Chiefs 
Sarah Seely — Journalism 1, 2; Eng. 
11 A; Treaty 



%\ 



Faculty/55 



They Teach The Children 



Contrary to popular belief, being a 
teacher is not easy. It takes a great 
deal of work, patience, responsibility, and 
dedication to be a teacher. 

The teacher's day commences at 7:15 
when he checks in at the office. At 7:55 the 
bell signaling the start of first bell rings, 
and the teacher's frightening ordeal begins. 

Teachers must put up with all kinds of 
conduct. Poor behavior tests a teacher's 
endurance. By sixth bell, their patience is a 
time bomb just ticking away. The slightest 
movement could trigger it. 

Teachers must stand all day before a 
congregation of students, who may or may 
not be awake. Speaking in front of a large 
group of people may not be easy, but talk 
ing to a group of people who are not paying 



[ 




It's A Tough Job 



attention is much worse. 

When the bell rings at 2:00, the students 
depart, but the teachers do not. Many 
teachers stay after to offer extra help to 
those students who need it. They must 
also stay to attend any faculty meetings. 

Teachers, too have homework. Grading 
papers is a time consuming task requiring 
a great deal of effort. Teachers must pre- 
pare lesson plans and test and devise a 
class schedule which includes the informa- 
tion to be covered in class. At the end of 
each nine weeks the teacher must also 
average grades for report cards. 

A teacher undergoes a long day that is 
not always enjoyable. So the next time 
your teacher gives you detention, remem- 
ber, it is not easy being a teacher. 




4k 



,J-' -■•1^ 



Because she doesn't have a classroom of her own. Miss 
Stokey must transport all her belongings from room to 
room on a small but useful cart. 



56/ Faces 



I 



Mr Phelps, a geography teacher, works hard to pre- 
pare lesson plans and grade papers 




Jean Siler — Typing 1, 2; Steno. 1; 

Notehand 

Wanda Smith — Office Secretary 

Jim Stankus — Elect 1, 2; Woods 1 



Neil St. Laurent — Computer Science 

Jane Stokey — Eng. II A; Eng 12A; 

Montage 

Kay Swartz — librarian 



Jerry Sydow — Metals 1, 2; Drafts 3, 4; 

Industrial Arts Club: Boys' Tennis 

Nancy Tafe — Eng. lOA. 12A 

Barret Tharrington — (Jovernment.: U.S. 

History; Junior Class Sponsor 

Dick Thompson — Government 

Charles Traub — Ecology; Biology 



George Versprllle — P.E. 10; Football; 

Boys' Track; Varsity Club 

Irma Vinson — World History; U.S. 

History; International Relations 

Cheryl Walker — Department Chairman; 

Physics; Chem.; Girls' Tennis 

Jean Wallin — Guidance Counselor 

William Watson — Government 



Jim Weaver — U.S. History; Key Club 

Hilda Wells — Government 

James Winslow — Soc. 1. 2; U.S. 

History 

Bernlce Woodfin — Guidance Office 

Secretary 

John Zadell — Draft 1, 2; Woods 1, 2 



Faculty/57 



An Unforgettable Year 



Senior Officers Work Hard For Their Class 



Though it seemed impossible, 1984 fi- 
nally arrived, bringing with it a new 
senior class headed by four new officers. 
President Fred Lentz, Vice-President Mau- 
reen Bastek, Secretary Kris Worrell, and 
Treasurer Theresa Labyak worked hard to 
make 1984 a year seniors would remember 
as "their year". 

Beginning in early August, the officers 
prepared for the next nine months which 
the Class of '84 would come to know as 
"senior year." They organized the assem- 
bly of dedicated seniors who battled the 
hot August sun to erect the senior sign 
designed by Vyc Carolino and Rod Annet. 
As school started, many other activities 



WILLIAM D. ABELE 
SCOTT L. ABSHIRE 
TERESA L. ADAMS 
ANGELA L . ADKJNS 
CHl^lJrillNLM. 



got underway. Fundraisers were held to 
collect money for prom and graduation. 
Hundreds of boxes of M&M's were sold, as 
well as a great number of carnations. Indi- 
vidual class bumper stickers were also a 
good source of senior income this year and 
promoted a sense of pride in one's own 
class. The seniors also sold sweatshirts 
with the familiar senior sign on the back. 

Seniors raised class spirit in other ways. 
For one football game, the senior class 
organized a cheering section to root for the 
Chiefs. Participants wore hats to identify 
themselves, and each received a noise- 
maker in return. 

The senior class also had a number of 



joint projects with the SCA. A food drive 
took place before Thanksgiving to provide 
two needy families with enough food for 
the holidays. At Christmas time, the two 
organizations showed a movie called The 
Miracle on 34th Street and charged a toy 
for admission that would be donated to 
"Toys for Tots." 

The Class of '84 shared many successes 
together. They had an elegant prom at the 
Omni Hotel. They also planned a memora- 
ble graduation ceremony. President Fred 
Lentz sums up his feelings by saying, "To- 
gether, I think we have seen a successful 
year. The seniors have bound together to 
form an unforgettable Class of '84." 



AGGAS 



CRAIG S. 

ALEXANDER 

WILLIAM S. ALLISON 

AMY D. ALTMAN 

MICHAEL S. 

ANDERSON 

ROD R. ANNET 



AMY C. ARNOLD 

YVONNE ARMOND 

FAY ANN R. AROMIN 

KIMBERLY A. AGER 

TRACY J. BACHMAN 




58/ Faces 






Senior Class Officers: from left — Kris Worrell, Mau- 
reen Bastek, Fred Lentz, Theresa Labyak, Linda 
Ruesch (sponsor) 




CHERRI A. BAILEY 
DEBORAH A. BAILEY 
ANTHONY M. BAKER 
PATRICIA A. BARNES 
ROBIN R. BARNETTE 



JODI L. BARRETT 
PATRICIA A. 
BARROW 
THERESA BARRY 
CHRISTOPHER B. 
BARTON 
MAUREEN E. 
BASTEK 



STEPHANIE L. 
BAGMANN 
BONNIE L. BEAL 
MARIE A. BEASLEY 
ROBERT C. BELDA 
JOHN T. BELECHAK 



DAVID J. BELL 

JOYCE E. BELL 

MARTA BELL 

N. KATHRYN 

BELOTE 

GILBERT T. BENHAM 



Seniors/ 59 



JAMES D. BERGEN 

STEVE R. BERMAN 

SAMDRA G. BERRY 

DAVID R. BESHIRS 

ERIC W. BEYER 



JOHN T. BIANCO 

BELINDA A. BIGHAM 

HEATHER BLACK 

WENDY J. 

BLANCHER 

SUZANNE BLEVINS 



BETH A. BOETTE 

TODD BONE 

SaSAN M. BONEY 

RONALD G. BONNEY 

EMILY R. BORDY 



AlKJHAEL^ 

BOGDELL 

RHONDA R. BOYLE 

CHRISTOPHER W. 

BRENNER 

PAIGE BRICE 

RONALD D. BRISCOE 



Will Warren Christie and Robert Davis ever tame 
those wild and curly locks? 




60/ Faces 





In 1994 



A DAM C. BRQWM 
CHERYL D. BROWM 
PAMELA D. BROWN 
SHARON L. BROWN 
THOMAS M. BROWN 



LYNNE BRYANT 
HELEN BUCHANAN 
JAMES S. BGDDO 
ARACELI C. BUENO 
JACQUELINE F. 
BUNTING 



TAMMY M. 
BURDETTE 
CALVIN C. BURKE 
MORTEN 
BUTTENSCHEN 
KEVIN A. CAHOON 
ALDEN E. 
CALDWELL 



I he Class of '84 undeniably consisted 
K of many unique individuals. Will the 
lass members still have those interesting 
ualities when they meet for their ten year 
iunion? 

- Will Merlin Swartzentruber follow in 
le footsteps of another famed football 
\erlin (Olsen)? 

- Will Rob Hicks and Mike O'Hara be- 
ome Super Bowl "Hogs?" 

- Will Scott Clark color coordinate his 
'ardrobe? 

- Will Karen and Kathy Pocock have a 
?n year contract with the Doublemint 
ium Company? 

- Will David Hilton own a chain of hotels? 

- Will Carrie West still be rooting for the 



Will Ten Years Change Your Classmates? 



Dallas Cowboys? 

— Will Brian Milliken defeat Fay Aromin 
and become the new G.S. limbo champi- 
on? 

— Will T.J. Morgan still use Ben-gay to 
relieve those aches and pains? 

— Will Jim Fussell move to Japan and 
become a Sumo wrestler? 

— Will Cindy Wright still be mad that she 
missed one problem on the SAT? 

— Will Matt Thompson gain four hundred 
pounds and open his own pizzeria called 
"Matio's?" 

— Will Tommy Brown abandon his leather 
shoes and ties for a cut-off t-shirt, desert 
boots, and ragged jeans? 

— Will Cheryl Brown abandon Tommy 



Brown? 

— Will Vinny Chiusano still be threatening 
the student body in a pinstriped suit? 

— Will Tom Kaupus and Brian Koehr still 
be dribbling on the hardwood? 

— Will Kris Worrell still be listening to the 
Rolling Stones? 

— Will Fred Lentz win another election? 

— Will Sandy Cohen and Karen Colucci 
still be friends? 

— Will Maureen Bastek be the first woman 
on a men's professional soccer team? 

— Will the Class of '84 retain that Kemps- 
ville spirit and Chief pride? 

— Will the Class of '84 make it to '85? 
After all, it is "1984!" 



Seniors/61 



JGLIE K. CALLIS 

LINDA M. CAMPBELL 

WALTER E. 

CAMPBELL 

DAVID A. CAPWELL 

JILL M. CARLTON 



VYC CAROLING 

JOAN CAROLLO 

APRIL L. CARPENTER 

MARIPAT CARR 

MARGARET C. 

CARRIKER 



KIMBERLY H. CASON 

RAGL D. CASTILLO 

ANNE G. CASTLES 

KIM A. CAUDLE 

LISA M. CERCHIARO 



VICKI P. CHALFIN 
MIGUEL A. CHAVES 



62/ Faces 




LILLY D. CHEN 



Emily Bordy chooses to 
savage tan. 




KIMBERLY Y. 

CHERRY 

VINCENT P. 

CHIUSANO 

BARRY P. CHOVITZ 



WARREN B. 
CHRISTIE 
SCOTT W. CLARK 



RONALD S. CLARKE 
AMY E. CLGVERIGS 
SANDY S. COHEN 
KATHY A. COLLINS 
GAYLE M. COLSON 



KAREN A. COLUCCI 
STEVE R. COMEAG 
JILL E. COMESS 
DGANE P. COMPTON 
DIANA L. COOPER 




V^ 



« 



Lazy Days 



Students Enjoy Relaxation 



The nine months of hard labor are 
over! Summer has arrived. It is time 
to enjoy the long, relaxing days of this lazy 
season. Since there are only three months 
of this warm weather to unwind from the 
torturing school year, students find several 
ways to spend their precious time. 

There are the beach bums who spend 
the entire summer at the beach, constantly 
soaking up the sun and darkening their 
tan. If the sun starts to scorch their bodies, 
they drive to the Big Banana and water- 
slide to instant relief for their "well-done" 
skin. Then there are the surfers who go to 
the beach to practice their masterful skills 
on their surfboards only to find that riding 
Virginia Beach's two-foot waves is not 
easy. 

Traveling is another popular way of 
passing away summer time. Many stu- 
dents travel to different parts of the United 



States or even the world, visiting friends 
and relatives, having family reunions, or 
just experiencing a new culture to add their 
many adventures. But you do not have to 
travel a long distance to experience some- 
thing new. People take their family and 
friends to the nearby amusement parks 
like King's Dominion and Busch Gardens 
and undergo exciting adventures such as 
riding the Loch Ness Monster for the first 
time. 

Leaving the house is not all there is to 
summer. Some people just stay at home, 
sip their Diet-Rite cola, and catch up on 
their soaps. 

Well, whatever you are planning on do- 
ing this summer, whether it be traveling or 
just lying around, you better do it fast, 
because before you know it, these lazy 
days will be coming to an end. 



Seniors/63 



Kempsville's Secret Success 



Senior Secret Pal Program Unites Seniors And Teachers 



One often forgets the age-old tradition 
of placing an apple on a teacfier's 
desk as a plea for mercy. A student may 
also bring an apple to his or her favorite 
teacher as a token of friendship, in either 
case, the old let'sgive-theteacheran-apple- 
soshewill-giveusan-A trick has changed 
over the years. Now the seniors have cre- 
ated a new method of sending gifts to 
teachers. 

Created five years ago, the Senior Secret 
Pal program was designed to give the sen 
iors an opportunity to get better acquaint- 
ed with the teachers. Each senior is as- 
signed a teacher, a "pal," to whom he or 



KEMMETH M. 

COOPERMAN 

KELLY A. COPELAND 

LISA R. COUINTS 

WANDA C. COWAN 

ROBERT L. 

CROCKETT 



NANNETTE F. 

CGLLOM 

AMANDA G. 

CUMMINGS 

SCOTT A. 

CGMMINGS 

DANIEL CGRRAN 

MARILYN J. DANIELS 



SCOTT DANIELSON 

JEFFREY S. DARRAH 

LYNN DAUGHTREY 

AMY L. DAVENPORT 

FRANKLIN H. 

DAVENPORT 



she secretly sends gifts. The teacher, or 
"pal," in turn, also sends gifts to the same 
person. Nowadays, a teacher no longer 
finds an apple on her desk, but rather a 
plate of chewy chocolate chip cookies, a 
stuffed animal, or even a flower with a note 
attached saying, "Have a great day!". The 
seniors receive a variety of gifts, including 
cards, T-shirts, Kempsville memorabilia, 
and many goodies. As the office workers 
deliver the gifts during first bell, the seniors 
and their Secret Pals each hope to receive 
a little something to brighten up the day. 
Serving as the co-chairpersons of the 
Senior Secret Pal program, Susan Slaugh- 



ter and Leslie Shapiro were not only re- 
sponsible for designating each senior with 
a Secret Pal, but also organized an end-of- 
the-year breakfast at which time the Secret 
Pals revealed themselves. Susan stated, "1 
think Secret Pals are a lift to your day. It 
was a lot of work and without Leslie Sha- 
piro and sponsor Miss Ruesch, the pro- 
gram would not have been a success." The 
Senior Secret Pal program was a success- 
ful "joint-effort" by all and will, without a 
doubt, become more popular as time goes 
on. 



64/ Faces 




Mrs. Karcher knows if is going to be a good day when 
Jackie Bunting hands her a gift from her senior secret 
Pal. 



WENDY E. DAVIES 




KATHLEEN F. DAVIS 
ROBERT S. DAVIS 



MARK A. DEANGELO 
MICHAEL L. 
DEANGELO 
DIANE DEBOBES 
EILEEN M. DEEGAN 
CHRISTINA DELANO 



JILL L. DELK 
JOHN J. DESARRO 
LIESL R. DEVARY 
MARIE L. 
DILEONARDO 
KELLY D. DILLMAN 



CHIAKI DILLS 
ROBERT M. DIMMICK 
ALEXIS L. DOBLER 
AMY P. 

DOMBROWSKI 
CAROL A. 
DONNARGMMA 



Seniors/65 



Making The Grade 



Selected KHS Students Attend Governor's School 



Out of the seven hundred nominees for 
Governor's School, only four hun- 
dred and fifty were accepted. Kempsville 
High School was priviledged enough to 
have five students attend this summer pro- 
gram for academically gifted students. The 
purpose of Governor's School is to provide 
intellectually challenging and enriching ex- 
periences for these specially selected stu- 
dents. 

The 1983 Governor's School was held at 
two locations, Longwood College and Vir- 
ginia Tech. Participants chose a field to 
major in, such as political science or physi- 
ology. For four weeks the students attend- 
ed morning and afternoon classes regular- 



KAREM A. DOWrSIMG 

SEREMA D. DULIN 

KAREN E. DGNSHEE 

JEFFREY A. EDNEY 

AUDREY A. EHLY 



ly. After these classes many attended 
seminars or participated in informal small 
group discussions. The physical aspect of 
a healthy individual was not overlooked, 
though. Every day, one or two hours were 
devoted to recreational activities such as 
swimming or soccer. The "night life" at 
Governor's School consisted of specially 
prepared activities such as concerts, mov- 
ies, and dramatic productions. Often there 
were lectures by such guest speakers as an 
ambassador from Zambia or a member of 
the State Department. Though no grades 
or credit was given, every student was ex- 
pected to tackle academic pursuits in a 
scholarly manner, because the program's 



emphasis was placed on learning. 

The students chosen to attend the '83 
Governor's School were Ericka Kammerer, 
Lilly Chen, Brian Koehr, Cynthia Wright, 
and Brad Lenox. Brian Koehr summarized 
his feelings about his experience at Gover- 
nor's School when he said, 'I feel fortunate 
to have had the opportunity to meet and 
live with others who share my interests 
and abilities. I went to Governor's School 
expecting to find two hundred dull book- 
worms, but I was surprised to find a group 
of easy going people. It was an experience I 
will always remember." 



LOMNICA 

EINTHOVEM 

PETER J. FAITH 

ALBERT L. FAM 

TAMALA A. FARMER 

ERIC C. FARRER 



JACK T. FARRER 

STEPHEN M. 

FASAINARO 

APRIL D. FELLERS 

ELIZABETH S. 

FENTOM 

PIPER L. FERGGSOM 




66/ Fdces 




; Governor's School: Ericka Kammerer, Brad Lenox, 
Brian Koehr, Lilly Chen (not pictured: Cindy Wright). 



GINA L. FERRARI 
JAYN A. FISHER 
DAWN L. FITCH 
BARBARA E. 
FLATLEY 
THERESA R. 
FLETCHER 



THERESA J. FLINT 
ALYSSA J. FLOWERS 
STEPHEN E. FOGLE 
MICHAEL G. FOJTIK 
ROBERT B. FOLEY 



MEREDITH P. 

FORBES 

THOMAS FORD 

MARIBETH FRANCIS 

STEPHANIE L. 

FRANKLIN 

DONNIE W. FRENCH 



DAVID FGLGHAM 
JANE E. FCJQGA 
DIANE L. FUSS 
JAMES D. FUSSELL 
TIMOTHY M. GARZA 



Seniors/67 



Kempsville Legislators 



Student Politicians Govern State For A Week 



Boys' and Girls' State is a week-long 
program, sponsored by the Anneri- 
can Legion, which teaches the younger 
generation how our government operates 
and establishes a strong feeling of patrio- 
tism and respect for the United States. Ap- 
proximately 1,600 students attended State 
during the first week of summer vacation. 
Girls' State was held at Longwood College 
in Farmville, Virginia, while Boys' State 
was held at Lynchburg College in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia. 



CHARLES E. GEORGE 

KAREN M. GERALD 

^ARK A. GERASCH 

ANGIE L. GIBSON 

TINA K. GIBSON 



Kempsville's representatives to Boys' 
State were Brian Koehr, T.J. Morgan, Brad 
Shaw, David Hager, Gil Benham, and Craig 
Hudson. Girls' State was attended by Emi- 
ly Bordy, Lisa Martin, Teresita Ortega, and 
Kathy Wanzong. After arriving at their re- 
spective colleges, the students were split 
into different groups called "cities ". In 
these cities, they elected and ran for var- 
ious local and national governmental posi- 
tions. They were held responsible for estab- 
lishing a model government and making 



the laws which controlled this government. 
Craig Hudson summed up his feelings 
for Boys' State by saying, "It was a won- 
derfully enlightening experience that I 
would not have missed for all the gold in 
California." Lisa Martin, who attended ■ 
Girls' State, had basically the same senti- 
ments, "Gee whiz, I did not think it was 
possible for a gal like me to have that 
much fun!" 



[ 



TED E. GLICKMAN 

MELISSA R. 

GONZAGA 

MARY T. GOODWIN 

JOHN C. GRADY 

AMY C. GRAY 



KYLE H. GREEN 
GEORGE R. GREENE 

LISA M. GREENE 
RONALD H. GREENE 

TERRI L. GRIFFIN 




68/ Facet 




Boys' and Girls' State participants: Craig Hudson, 
Brad Shaw, David Hager, Gil Benham, Brian Koehr, 
Emily Bordy, and Lisa Martin (Not pictured: T.J. Mor- 
gan, Kathy Wanzong, and Teresita Ortega.) 



JO ANNE GRIGGS 
TAMMY E. GRISAFI 
TODD GRISSOM 
DORIS A. GRGMBACH 
DAVID R. HAGER 



ALESIA R. HALL 

LISA J. HALL 

MICHELLE L. 

HAMILTON 

DOAK W. HARBISON 

TERESA HARDIN 



DIXIE L. HARDISON 
CECILIA HARO 
GARY D. HARRIS 
KAREN E. HARRIS 
KRISTAL L. HARRIS 



JGDI L. HART 
ROBERT L. HASKETT 
KIM A. HASSON 
JILL R. HAVERSON 
KATHY L. 
HAWTHORNE 



Seniors/69 



Brian Koehr, a senior, helps underclassman Mary 
Conway by boosting her up so she can read what is at 
the very top of the activities board. 



VIRGINIA D. HAYES 



LORI L. HAZZARD 



REBECCA L. HEATH 

AUDREY E. HELBIG 

LARRY S. HELVY 

BRIAM D. HENRY 

HOPE D. HERRIT 



ROBERT G. HICKS 

WALTER 

HILDERBRAND 

DAVID V. HILTON 

CATHLEEN D. 

HIMCHAK 

DAVID V. HINDS 



JEFFREY S. HINSON 

ANNICE M. HIRT 

LIESL R. HOCK 

■CHARI FS W 

HODGES 

JOHN L. HOEKE 




70/ Faces 



Helpful Seniors 



Seniors Don't Really Abuse Their Power 



Seniors have been known to put the 
underclassmen to shame by cutting 
in front of them in the lunch line, making 
them carry their books, and shoving them 
out of their way when the senior is late for 
class. If this is not enough, they will also 
laugh as the underclassmen ride the bus to 
school, taking their french fries during 
lunch, and simply making fun of them. 

But has anyone noticed that seniors can 
be very helpful in many ways to juniors 
and sophomores? For example, on the first 
day of school, the new members of the 
high school often ask the big seniors, 
"Where is room 101?" That look of inno- 
cence and concern on the underclassmen's 
faces cannot be resisted as the big seniors 
politely point them in the right direction. 

When an important football game on Fri- 
day night cannot be missed and the under- 
classman is seen walking briskly to the 
school to see the game, the senior again 
cannot just drive by. So the underclass- 
man jumps in the car driving off with the 
senior. 

This just goes to show that there is a 
side of a senior that has a soft spot for the 
lowly underclassmen that is willing to help 
them whenever in need. "But don't abuse 
this privilege," says Brian Koehr, a senior, 
"or if we ever find you falling in the creek, 
we just might leave you there." 





SCOTT HOFFMAN 
MARTHA E. HOGGE 
LISA HOLLAND 



KATHY 

HOLLIINGSWORTH 
JOEL M. 
HOLMSTOCK 
THOMAS J. HOPPER 



RICHARD A. HORSCH 
SGSAIN L. HOSKINS 
KIM J. HOGDE 



STEWART HOWARD 

CHRISTINE L. 

HOWELL 

CINDY A. HOWELL 

CRAIG R. HUDSON 

JULIE A. HUDSON 



KENNETH F. HUNT 
DEBRA L. HGRVITZ 
DAVID W. 
HGTCHENSON 
LAWRENCE I'ANSON 
DGANE T. INSKEEP 



Seniors/71 



Dawn Fitch, a senior, sits in an empty classroom in 
order to finish an important test during Senior Skip 
Day. 




DANA A. JACKSON 

DELANEA A. 

JACKSON 

LORI A. JACKSON 

JENNIFER C. JAMES 

WILLIAM 

JENNESTREET 



RICHARD A. JENSEN 

TERESA L. JENSEN 

TRACEY R. JOE 

DANA M. JOHNSON 

KAREN E. JOHNSON 



KIMBERLEY 

JOHNSTON 

BRENDA JONES 

DONALD JONES 

GLENDA JONES 

KELLEY L. JONES 



^1 



I 

H 



i 



1 

I 



72/ Faces 



Seniors' Day Off 



Seniors Look Forward To Senior Skip Day 



The big day comes when a senior has to 
prepare for prom and has to usually 
stay home to do so. This is known as the one 
land only "Senior Skip Day." But do seniors 

lireally remain in their secluded houses waiting 
for the time to come to go to prom? Maybe, 
but it is highly unlikely. 

Seniors usually use this day for some last 
minute needs that they had forgotten or to 
just relax. For example, seniors will do some 
last minute shopping, relax at the warm 
sandy beach, get together with friends to talk 

■about the night's activities, or get a last min- 
ute haircut. 

The attendance office has revealed that al- 
most 95% of seniors stay away from school 
on this day. That is, for an approximate num- 
ber of 645 seniors who attend Kempsville, 
about only 30 students go to school on this 
day. 

Every year seniors are given the chance to 
gnjoy this senior privilege. But for those who 

, have to stay in school in order to pass or to 
iust take an important test, the prom will be 
Awaiting. 





ROfNALD JONES 
TAMMY L. JOMES 
CHERYL G. JOYMER 



ERICKA KAMMERER 
STEVEN J. KANTER 
DONNA M. KARAS 



MICHEAL D. KATZ 
THOMAS R. KAGPAS 
TERRY L. KERNODLE 
CANDICE M. KINARD 
KAREN L. KING 



SGSAN H. KIRK 
WILLIAM B. KITCHEN 
CAROL 

KLINEFELTER 
BRIAN KOEHR 
BARBARA L. 
KOEPPEN 



DARIN G. KOFROTH 

RAMONA L. 

KOHANEK 

GREG J. KOLCGM 

JOHN T. KROLL 



Seniors/ 73 



Documented Proof 



Senior Constitution Upholds Senior Status 



When the founding fathers of 
Kempsville High School estab- 
lished this school as an independent insti- 
tution, the seniors acknowledged the equa- 
lity of all students, fully aware of the fact 
that the seniors were more equal. Through 
specific ideals, it was understood that the 
school would be executed by the seniors, 
for the seniors, and of the seniors. Thus, a 
fornnal doctrine was drawn, and the stu- 
dents were sworn to uphold the rights con- 
tained in the Constitution of the Senior 
Class of Kempsville High School. 

"We the People of the Senior class, in 
Order to form a more perfect school, estab- 
lish skip day, insure rights to parking stick- 
ers, provide for the good of the class, pro- 
mote the general friendships, and secure 
the blessings of the principal, to ourselves 
and our posterity, do ordain and establish 
this Constitution for the Senior class of 
Kempsville High School." 
— fNo senior shall be unfairly accused of 
crimes, nor shall he be forced to give 
incriminating evidence. In addition, the 



MARTHA 

KGBISZEWSKI 

MARK KUMPF 

THERESA A. LABYAK 

AGREA Q. LACSON 

JOHM LAINE 



senior shall not be deprived of his right 
to life, liberty, and property without 
due process of Senior law. 

■ In all Kempsville prosecutions, the sen- 
ior shall enjoy the right to a speedy trial 
by a jury consisting of partial members 
of the senior class. The senior will have 
every opportunity to clear his name. 
No prosecuting attorney will be pre- 
sent. 

The senior shall not be denied a trial by 
friends and can never be accused of the 
same crime again. 

IHo excessive punishment such as de 
tention, cafeteria duty, or other similar 
penalty shall be inflicted. 
The enumeration in the Constitution of 
certain rights shall not be construed to 
deny or disparage others retained by 
the seniors. 

The powers not delegated to the stu- 
dent body by the Constitution, nor pro- 
hibited by the faculty, are reserved for 
the senior class. 

Once this constitution was completed 



and ratified, it became obvious to the sen- 
iors that a list of amendments securing 
their rights was necessary to the function 
of the school. In order to fulfill their need 
for personal rights, the Seniors" Bill of 
Rights was established. From there on, 
these ten statements forever prevented the 
infringement of personal honor, integrity, 
and freedom. 

— The faculty shall make no rule prohibit- 
ing the right of seniors to peaceably 
assemble or petition the faculty for a 
redress of grievances. 

— A well regulated party being necessary 
to uphold the reputation of seniors 
shall not be infringed. 

— No sophomore shall, at any time, be 
quartered in any room with a senior. 

— The right of seniors to be secure in 
their persons, lockers, and notebooks 
against unreasonable searches and sei- 
zures. 



KIMBERLY JO LAKEY 

JACK H. LAME 

PATRICIA A. 

LAMGHORME 

JUDITH M. 

LAMKFORD 

SABRINA K. LAPP 



CHARLES E. 

LAGCHNER 

KERRY A. LAGGHLIN 

KATHLEEN A. 

LAVEMDOSKY 

TRACEY L. LAVELY 

VICTORIA L. LAW 




74/Faces 



Fred Lentz, Ted Glickman, and Mike Morris display 
their "Chief" patriotism by simulating Archibald M. 
Willard's famous painting. "The Spirit of '76." 




LAGRIE M. 
LAWRENCE 



MELCHOR J. LAZO 



MATTHEW K. LEEDS 
BRADFORD R. 
LENOX 

FREDERICK C. 
LENTZ 
JENNIFER G. 
LIVINGSTON 
DONNA M. LOCH 



TRAGI L. LOFLIN 
AMY M. LONGMAN 
MONA R. LYNCH 
KELLY A. LYONS 
BRGCE H. LYTLE 



ROCHELLE A. 

MABRY 

DAWN MADISON 

KAREN L. MANNING 

BRENDA L. MANTTA 

KATHY A. 

MARCINKO 



Seniors/75 



The Fight For The Top 



Seniors Realize The Stress Of Tlieir Last Year 



I it has been said that the senior year is 
the best year of high school. To a cer- 
tain extent, this may be true, but because 
of academic pressures shouldered by sen 
iors concerning colleges' admission re 
quirements, class ranking, and school 
work, the senior year may be the hardest 
There is an enormous amount of compe 
tition among many seniors for the highest 
possible class ranking. Before this year, 
the grades of academic courses were 
weighted equally; therefore a student 
might take very remedial classes and still 
receive the same number of points as a 
student who takes superior classes, in or- 
der to prevent this system from continu- 
ing, officials have adopted the system of 
weighted grades. In this system an "A" in 
an advanced placement course is worth 
more points than an "A" in an average 
course. This gives many students the drive 
to successfully complete advanced place- 



TIMOTHY C. MARKS 

ROBERT MARSH 

DEBRA A. 

MARSHALL 

JANET M. MARTIN 

LISA J. MARTIN 



ment courses while receiving the extra 
points. 

Another important concern of the senior 
involves what college he or she would like 
to attend. Some students may receive a 
scholarship for academic or athletic abili- 
ties. The representatives of the colleges 
which offer scholarships unintentionally 
pressure students by interviewing them or 
visiting KHS to scout their talents. The 
students realize how important it is to cre- 
ate good impressions in order to receive 
these valuable scholarships. 

The senior at KHS has much to look 
forward to in the future. They have spent 
thirteen years of their lives in school, and 
they are now prepared to attend college or 
enter the job world. The knowledge these 
seniors have received at KHS will remain 
with them and aid them in their struggle 
for the top. 



ROBERT E. MARTON 

JURELL A. MASON 

ALANA J. MATLING 

BRIAN L. MATTHEWS 

ELIZABETH E. 

MATTHEWS 



SUSAN W. 

MATTHEWS 

ALAN E. MATYAS 

WILLIAM MAGLL 

MICHELE D. MAGNEY 

DANA L. MAYO 




76/F8ce8 




ROBERT W. 
McANDREWS 
DANA L. McBRIDE 
LORIE L. McCLAIN 



DAVID W. McCLENNY 
PAMELA F. 
A\cDArSIEL 
DOANE^. 
"McDnmELL 



SHEILA R. McGLONE 
HEATHER K. 
McPARTLAND 
KAREN A. MEAKIN 
ANTHONY J. 
MERCGRIO 
DALE A. MEYER 



HORACE J. MILLER 
JAMES J. MILLER 
MALIA L. MILLER 
STEVEN J. MILLER 
BRIAN S. MILLIKEN 



KAREN L. MITCHELL 
BECKY A. MOHAP 
JOHN B. MOORE 
MARK S. MOORE 



Seniors/ 77 



Hd 



JGLIE L. MORGAN 

T.J. MORGAM 

BRIAM K. MORRIS 

MICHAEL S. MORRIS 

RODMEY MORRISON 



CATHY D. MORTON 

WAYNE S. MOSS 

ANGELA P. MOTE 

JOYCE L. MOTLEY 

KARI D. MOTLEY 



KATHLEEN C. 

MUELLER 

WILLIAM R. MGSE 

BRAD J. NACHMAN 

MICHELE NAGJOKS 

LEWIS R. NEWBY 



GLENN S. NICELY 

NICOLE E. NICELY 

STEPHEN H. 

NICHAEL 

LELA M. NIXON 

JOSEPH M. OCTAVO 



Students' cars fill up the parking lot at Kempsville 
High School. 



78/ Faces 




Kempsville's Car Lot 



iVhich Car Is Yours? 

The students of the class of 1984 can 
be found in the drivers' seats of 
Tiany colorful, unique, and classy cars. If 
ane looks out on the parking lot during 
school hours one will see a variety of auto- 
Tiobiles. 

Kempsville High School may not have 
James Bond's Aston Martin, but it does 
nave Brad Shaw's fire-engine red Karmann 
jhia. Certainly it is sporty enough for an 
jndercover agent. Perhaps that's why 
Brad drives as though he were being fol- 
owed by Soviet spies and parks incon- 
spicuously next to V/arren Christie's 1953 
Chevrolet Bel Air convertible. 

Kempsville may not employ its own 
mailman, but it does have the T.J. Ex- 
press, driven by T.J. Morgan. This white 



mail truck has probably made more round 
trips to K.H.S. than all of the school buses 
combined. 

Kempsville may not have its own 
"Knight Rider," but it does have Cheryl 
Strange's 1984 Camaro. This brand new, 
teetop, candy-apple red sports car could 
give even K.I.T.T. a run for his money. 

Kempsville High may not have its own 
nuclear power plant, but it does have 
Adam Wesberry's "Adam Bomb." During 
the summer one could spot the psychedel- 
ic car miles away. Now, for the school 
year, the car has been repainted an electric 
blue. 

Be it a Ferrari or the family station wag- 
on, the car one drives his senior year will 
always be remembered. 




BARRY E. ODOM 
MICHAEL O'HARA 
THOMAS E. OLIVER 
ROBIN D. OLMSTEAD 
LORRIE A. O'NEAL 



ASHLEY L. ONKS 

TERESITA T. 

ORTEGA 

NANCY O. PACIFICO 

CHARLENE L. 

PALLET 

FRANK PANZARELLA 



PAMELA J. PAPPAS 
MELODY PARAGAS 
MARGARET M. 
PARENTEAG 
WILLIAM P. PARK 
ROBERT L. PARRISH 



.1 



Seniors/79 



T 



With a big smile on her face. Senior Lisa Martin helps Lisa 
Sprulll with her cap for the imp>ending graduation ceremony. 



ERIC PATTERSON 

DAVID C. PENSYL 

JEFFERY L. 

PERMENTER 

ASHLIE M. 

PERROTTA 

STEVEN W. PETERS 



TERESA A. 

PETTRGNY 

GEORGE M. PHELPS 

CHARLES G. 

PHILBRICK 

RYAN W. PIERCE 

STACEY L. PIERCE 



MICHAEL T. PITTS 

CYNTHIA L. PIVER 

KAREN POCOCK 

KATHRYN POCOCK 

STEVEN G. POHLY 




"Pomp And Circumstance" 



A Time For Fond Remembrances And Future Hopes 



80/ Faces 



All year long seniors were the big 
deal at Kempsville High School, but 
in May graduation left many confident ma- 
ture seniors feeling like children in the 
adult world. The graduate was faced with 
exciting feelings of anticipation for what 
lay ahead, yet he was also worried about 
his first year of college or finding the right 
job. The sizing of gowns and caps became 
of foremost importance, and of course, 
there were the graduation parties to plan. 
The graduate began to broaden his vision 
beyond his secure Kempsville environ- 
ment. There was a brand new world out 
there just waiting for him. To survive in 
this world, he must become an active part 
of it. The concept of adult responsibilities 
was very scary to some seniors, yet it pro- 
vided a challenge and a chance to show the 
others that they could make it on their 
own 

Despite all the busy plans and hopes for 
the future, graduation was a time to re- 



flect. The high school years were finally 
over, just when they seemed they would 
never end. However many seniors were up- 1 
set about leaving their school behind. The | 
realization hit that they had entered a turn- 
ing point in their lives. Their high school I 
days were only fond memories which they 
could never relive. They had to leave thel 
safe, secure world of their childhood andl 
enter the uncertain world of adulthood. In. 
his own way, each senior realized that 
when he marched down the aisle to thej 
tune of "Pomp and Circumstance," eachl 
step brought him nearer and nearer to 
growing up. The world was out there, justJ 
waiting for him. He could handle it; hel 
knew he could. Gsing what they had! 
learned through study and experience.f 
they would make their own way in the! 
world, yet never lose that special kind of| 
pride that could only come from Kemps|| 
ville. 



TAMARA L. PONDER 




JO ANN PONTILLO 
LISA M. POPPERWILL 



ERNEST V. PORTER 
ROBERT A. POTTS 
TIFFANY A. PRIMM 
MICHAEL S. PRINCE 
LAWRENCE 
PROCTOR 



GLENN M. QGIBAN 
BRENDA A. 
RABIDOUX 
DONNA M. RALEIGH 
STEVEN A. RALPH 
TROY D. RAMSEY 



KATHERINE 
RANDOLPH 
SaZANNE 
RAPCAVAGE 
MICHELLE A. 
RAVIZZA 

CATHERINE A. RAY 
CHRISTOPHER W. 
REGA 



PAGL A. 
REITELBACH 
CAROL L. RETTIE 
JGDSON C. RHODE 
DANIEL RHODES 
DONALD RHODES 



Seniors/81 



LYNDA JEAN 

RICHARDSON 

TIMOTHY NORMAN 

RIDDLE 

PARRISH LYNN RILEY 



CAROLYN WILSON 

RITTER 

JOSEPH FRANCIS 

RIVERA 

JAMES MYLOR 

ROBERTS 



BETH LYNN 

ROBERTSON 

CGRTIS ALLEN 

ROBINSON 

WENDY A. RODGERS 



JEFFREY SCOTT 

ROGERS 

JESSICA ANN 

ROGERS 

TIMOTHY MICHAEL 

ROGERS 



STEPHANIE JANE 

ROMINE 

REGINA MARIE 

ROSSI 

JEFFREY T. ROUSE 



STACEY LYNN 

RGDIGER 

ALTON BRYCE 

RUSSELL 

DANIEL F. 

RGSTCHEK II 




"May 1 

See Your 

Registration?" 

Seniors Fulfil 
Their Duties 

The Senior Dream . . . voting, driving 
and registering for the draft. Mosi 
twelfth graders have been driving for two 
years now, but with the passage of time 
these students have become increasinglj 
independent because of the growing trave 
freedom. Many seniors now have their owr 
cars, or at least the permanent use of th« 
family vehicle, which they use to travel t( 
school or work. This added responsibilitj 
helps to prepare the senior for college an< 
life on his own. 

Another responsibility entrusted in the 
eighteen-year-old is that of voting in state 
and federal elections. The selection of pub 
lie officials is an obligation which few sen 
iors take lightly. Seniors realize these au 
thoritative positions require capable offi 
cials, and most students take a serious 
interest in the voting process. Candidates 
for local elective offices frequently include 
Kempsville seniors when following the 
campaign trail. 

Registering for the draft is yet another 
part of the Senior Dream. Upon reaching 
their eighteenth birthday, male seniors rei 
alize, some with dismay, that they musf 
register. While this does not mean that the 
senior will be shipped off to some war in 
some international hotspot, the registra 
tion is a commitment many seniors are not 
eager to make. This is considered by some 
to be the only snag in the Senior Dream 

Students go through eighteen years of 
life, always eyeing the everelusive Senior 
Dream. The dreams of driving, voting, ana 
registering for the draft always seem iri' 
credibly far away. Then, on the exciting 
and important eighteenth birthday, it a 
happens. The Senior Dream has been 
achieved. 



highleen year old Stjcey Pierre takes matters intol 
her own hands as she registers to vote at Kempsviliej 
Phiiimacy, 



82 /Faces 




MARY KATHERINE 

RGTT 

PAULETTA 

SALMONS 

KEVIN DWAYNE 

SANFORD 

NANCY OBISPO 

SANTAMARIA 

MARY ANN 

SCAGLIONE 

PETER THOMAS 

SCHENCK 

JOAN ELIZABETH 

SCHERRER 

LISA MARIE SCHMON 

TRACEY SULLIVAN 

SCOTT 

VIRGINIA MAY 

SCOTT 

STEPHEN SEKERES 

III 

LESLIE BETH 

SHAPIRO 

BARRIE TAMARA 

SHARP 

KRISTIN KAY SHARP 

SUSAN FRYE 

SHARPE 

J BRADLEY SHAW 

GREGG ALLEN 

SHIMANDLE 

RICHARD LYNN 

SIBBERT 

DAVID NELSON 

SIMMONS 

LISA ANN SIMONS 



JOHN MICHAEL 
SINSABAUGH 



FRANCIS LEROY 
SINK 



Seniors /8t 



Double Jeopardy 



-**■. 



It's Not Easy Being Twins, But It's Fun 



The KHS senior class seems to have 
its share of twins. Kathy and Karen 
Pocock, Ronnie and Donnie Jones, and Da- 
vid and Donald Walker are just a few of the 
look-alikes. But what is it really like to 
come in a package? After asking the var- 
ious sets of twins to explain the advan- 
tages and disadvantages of their predica- 
ment, the KHS Image was supplied with 
the following information. 

Always being referred to as "twins" irks 
many "twins." They would like to be 
thought of as individual with separate 
minds and ideas. It is wrong to assume that 
because they look alike, they think alike. 
Although telling twins apart might present 
the casual observer with difficulty, con- 
stantly being called the wrong name irri- 
tate most twins. Furthermore, questions 



MICHELE 

SKELEMGER 

STEPHEN J. 

SKRAPITS 

KAREN G. SLAGLE 

SaSAN H. 

SLAUGHTER 

CHRIS M. SMITH 



such as "can you tell each other apart?" 
are most annoying. 

Surely there is a brighter side to this 
"double" situation. Twins can confuse 
friends and teachers by switching names, 
and they can also wear the same clothes. 
According to Mike DeAngelo, if one twin is 
in trouble, it is always nice to have some- 
one else to carry part of the blame — 
"Misery loves company." But perhaps 
companionship provides twins with the 
greatest advantage. Twins possess a spe- 
cial relationship. It is always consoling to 
know that there is someone who really 
understands you. 

So, the next time you see Kathy Pocock, 
or maybe it is Karen, — oh well, whichever 
one wears glasses . . . 



J 



Kathy and Karen Pocock stand at their loc 
just waiting for someone to confuse their nai 



DEBBIE S. SMITH 

JONATHAN O, SMITH 

TRACY E. SMITH 

DENISE SOKOLINSKY 

MARK SOKOLINSKY 



JAREDE. SPAIN 

DEVON C 

SPEARMAN 

WILLIAM E. 

SPEELMAN 

TAMMY L. SPEIGHT 

BRUCE SPIVA 




84/ Faces 



JODI M. SPRINGER 
LISA A. SPRGILL 




KEVIN W. SQUIRES 
GRANT S. STAFF 
HENRY W. 
STAFFORD 



LAURA E. STANULIS 
ANITA L. STATON 
JOHN R. STEMPLE 



ANDREA STEPNICK 
SHARON L. 
STEWART 
KEVIN M. STONE 
RAYMOND L. STONE 
CHERYL A. STRANGE 



DIANA L. 
STRICKLAND 
MARVIN L. 
STRICKLAND 
ERIC W. STROUP 
DOREEN E. 
SULLIVAN 
DEBORAH J. 
SUMNER 



PAUL B. 
SUTHERLAND 
JAMES T. SUTTON 
INGRID L. SVEDBERG 
CYNTHIA A. SWAIN 
HOWARD B. SWARTZ 



Senpors/85 



MERLIM 

SWARTZENTRGBER 

-J EFFREY M. SWY ERS_ 

JEFFREY A. SYKES" 

MORTIMER A. TAMM 

JR. 



DEBRA G. TATE 

ERIC Q. TAYLOR 

JERRY LEE TAYLOR 

SANDRA E. TAYLOR 



ROBERT R. TENNIS 

DENISE M. TEW 

LORI LEE THOMAS 

MARK A. THOMPSON 

MATTHEW J. 

THOMPSON 



ELIZABETH E. TILT 

JOSEPH S. TINKLER 

VALERIE S. 

TODESCO 

JOSEPH R. TRAIL 

COURT M. 

TRUEBLOOD 



GERALD A. TURNER 
PEGGIE L. TURNER 

EILEEN H. URMANN 
SHARON K. UTTER 
SHIRLEY A. UTTER 




86/ Faces 




The Way We Were 



Class Of '84 Reflects On The Past Three Years 



Memories light the corner of my 
mind." Reflecting on the past 
three years, the Class of '84 will surely 
cherish the moments of joy and sorrow 
spent at Kempsviile. Each memory holds 
something by which to learn, contributing 
to each graduate soon to leave our halls. 
Here are some things sure to be remem- 
bered by these special seniors: 

— The loss of the coin toss to First Colo- 
nial to determine who would represent 
the Beach District in the playoffs. 

— The Musicman, Oliver, and Camelot. 

— A first place ribbon for the Smurf in the 
1981 Homecoming parade. 

— The naming of Kempsviile as one of 
the "Top Five" schools in Virginia. 

— "The University of Virginia Beach". 

— The long road to state football playoffs 

— 1983. 




— The cold, rainy Saturday when the pain 
of loss covered the faces of fans and 
players. 

— The pride felt by Kempsviile athletes 
and fans upon obtaining numerous ath 
letic and academic awards. 

— "Jack and Diane", The Police, Vans, 
surfboards, punk rock, blowpops, com- 
puters, mohawks, loafers, and sum- 
mers at the beach. 

— Ring Dance and rings. 

— Prom night, Senior night, and of 
course, Graduation. 

— But most of all the Class of '84 will 
remember the faces of friends that 
made the high school years worth- 
while. The smiles and words of encour- 
agement will far outweigh the disap- 
pointments, and the "misty water-col- 
ored memories " will play once more. 



JENNIFER A. 
VALADE 
NANCY 

VANDENOaWEELEN 
TIMOTHY C. 
VANFOSSEN 
DIMITRI VOMVOURAS 
ANN H. WALKER 



DAVID L. WALKER 

DONALD E. WALKER 

MARY G. WALKER 

MICHAEL W. 

WALKER 

SEANNE K. WALKER 



CHRIS TOPHER P . 

W ALSH 

SEAN M. WALSH 

SUSAN H. WALTON 

WILLIAM J. WALTZ 

KATHLEEN 

WANZONG 



Seniors/87 



KENNETH C. WARD 

R. TROY WARD 

WILLIAM E. WARD 

JGLIE WARSHAW 

DEBRA R. 

WASHINGTON 



DEBORAH A. 

WASKEY 

KIMBERLY L. 

WATKINS 

RANI L. WATKINS 

MATTHEW C. 

WATSON 

MITCHELL K. 

WEATHERFORD 



LAGRIE A. WEBBER 

JERRY C. WELCH 

DANIEL W. WELLS 

ROBERT C. 

WELZANT 

JENNIE WERTH 



ADAM H. WESBERRY 

BRET M. WEST 

CARRIE L. WEST 

ROBIN WEST 

MICHEAL D. 

WHALEN 



WILLIAM H. 

WHINERY 

ANNETTE 

WHITAKER 

SANDRA J. 

WHITTAKER 

PETER M. WIDEL 

MARK W. WIDENER 




88/ Faces 



Super Sign 



A Sign For A New Year 

\tkt hile most of Kempsville's students 
WW are still basting their bodies under the 
'irginia Beach sun, a Senior class committee 
ilans, organizes, and builds Kempsville's an- 
lual masterpiece, the Senior sign. 

The undertaking begins at the end of the 
lunior year when the President-elect accepts 
esign submissions from the class populace, 
"his year's winning submission was intro- 
luced by Vyc Carolino. "I felt Kempsville 
leeded a macho and muscular Indian, so I 
Irew an Indian to whom any Pilgrim would be 
Toud to surrender his scalp." 
The month-long construction of the sign by 
handful of dedicated Seniors entailed plan- 
ling, painting, drawing, cutting, sawing, and 
lailing. 

Eric Stroup describes his devotion when he 
ays, "I have always wanted to leave my 
nark on Kempsville and now I feel I have." 
j The hanging of the sign required the help of 
jne Cardinal Sign Company. President Fred 
l.entz said, "It was a gratifying feeling to get 
Hhat darn sign up at last." 




Chief Kemp materializes on plywood as Vyc Carolino, 
Kyle Green, Rod Annet, and Bruce Spiva look on. 




i?^ 








MICHEAL P. 

WIERSCH 

JEFF A. WILLIAMS 

JAMES P. WILSON 

SaSAN K. WILSON 

DGANE D. 

WINGROVE 



SHELL R. WORKMAN 
KRIS A. WORRELL 
ANGELIA WORTH 
CYNTHIA L. WRIGHT 
DANA M. WRIGHT 



SCOT W. WaCHER 

CHRISTINE E. 

WGNDERLY 

COGRTNEY L. 

ZIERDEN 

KIM M. ZMARTHIE 

DAVID V. ZYZAK 



Seniors/89 



_J 




Best Dressed seniors lommy Brown and Cheryl Brown display their everyday, chic appear 
ance. 



90/ Faces 



Scott Clark and Regina Rossi, Most Talented Seniors, give the camera winning smiles, 
after playing lead roles in the spring musical 



Cathy Himchak and Brad Lenox, winners of Most 
Studious, are often seen in tfieir home away from 
home, the library 




The Chosen 
Few 



j '84 Superlatives 



A student's life is full of styles, ideas, 
and events that give each one a 
trademark of his own. A few select seniors 
have been chosen by their classnnates to 
epitomize the "Senior Superlatives." A 
senior does not receive this nomination 
through popularity alone. He must be a 
dedicated student or athlete, relate well to 
his peers, work for the betterment of his 
school, and strive for personal excellence. 
The senior class decided which students 
most displayed these traits and it was 
these students who were chosen. 

Each class is made up of many individ- 
ual personalities, and the class of 1984 was 
no exception. The students lived through 
many days of triumphs and defeats, laugh- 
ter and tears, but through it all they had 
each other. The few students who stood 
out as being "extra-special" were chosen 
as "Senior Superlatives." 



After winning the Most Spirited category, Barry Cho 
vitz and Courtney Zierden display that exuberant 
characteristic which gave them their victory. 




Unsung Heros, Troy Ramsey and Maureen Bastek 
(not pictured), don't care for recognition; they just like 
what they are doing and do it well. 



Superlatives/91 



Kempsville's Top Ten 




Outstanding Seniors Receive Recognition 

One may remember the little girl who 
lived around the corner that had al- 
ways fantasized of becoming a star-stud- 
ded celebrity. Then there lived next door 
the little boy who dreamed of becoming a 
famous football hero, unable to part with 
his Nerf football. Down the street there 
was another little girl with big freckles and 
short pigtails who had always shared her 
mud pies with the rest of the neighborhood 
kids. Little did one know that these chil- 
dren, seeking to develop their dreams and 
personalities, would grow to be just a few 
of the outstanding seniors of Kempsville 
High, known to many as Kempsville's Top 
Ten. 

Each year the members of the senior 
class acknowledge ten students who dis- 
play such characteristics as academic ex- 
cellence, athletic prowse (talented quali- 
ties), and friendliness. These students are 
hard workers who will stop at nothing to 
achieve their dreams, struggling each and 
every day to reach their goals. The senior 
class takes great pride in the prominent 
Top Ten, for these students represent the 
Class of 1984 at it best. 



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T J. Morgan 
Matt Thompson 
Susan Walton 




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lali 



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Courtney Zierden 
Bruce Spiva 



Brian Koehr 

Carrie West 

Gil Benham 

Susan Slaughter 

(Mike Morris — not pictured) 



92/Outstanding Seniors 



Honor Graduates 



Valedictorian: Ericka E. Kammerer 



Jalutatorian: Peggie Leigh Turner 



ALLISON. WILLIAM STUART 

ALTMAN, AMY 

ANNET, RODERICK 

BAILEY. CHERRI 

BARNETTE, ROBIN 

BARRY. THERESA 

BASTEK. MAUREEN 

BELOTE. NANCY 

BENHAM. GILBERT 

BIANCO. JOHN 

BLANCHER. WENDY 

BOETTE. BETH 

HONEY. SUSAN 

BORDY. EMILY 

BRENNER. CHRISTOPHER 

BROWN. THOMAS 

BUENO. ARACELI 

BUNTING. JACQUELINE 

CAROLLO. JOAN 

CASTLES. ANNE 

CHALFIN. VICTORIA 

CHEN. LILLY 

CHOVITZ. BARRY 

CHRISTIE. WARREN 

CLARK. SCOTT 

CLUVERIUS. AMY 

COHEN. SANDRA 

COLUCCI. KAREN 

COMEAU. STEVEN ROBERT 

COOPER, DIANA L. 

COURTNEY. PAMELA FAYE 

CUMMINGS. AMANDA G. 

DANIELS. MARILYN JANE 

DARRAH. JEFFREY SCOTT 

DAVENPORT. FRANKLIN HUGHE 

DEANGELO. MARK ANTHONY 

DEBOBES. DIANE 

DEEGAN. EILEEN MARY 

DILEONARDO. MARIE LYNN 

DULIN. SERENA DIANE 

FISHER. JAYN ANN 

FLATLEY. BARBARA ELIZABETH 

FLETCHER. THERESA ROCHELLE 

FLINT. THERESA JANE 

FORBES. MEREDITH PAIGE 

GIBBINGS. DAVID RUSSELL 

GONZAGA. MELISSA REBECCA 

GRAY. AMY 

GREENE. GEORGE ROBERT 



GREENE. RONALD H. 
HALL. LISA J. 
HARO. CECELIA A. 
HARRIS. KRISTAL 
HART. JUDI 
HAZZARD. LORI L. 
HIMCHAK. CATHLEEN D. 
HIRT. ANNICE M. 
HOEKE. JOHAN L. 
HORSCH. RICHARD A. 
HUDSON. CRAIG R. 
HURVITZ. DEBORA L. 
lANSON. LAWRENCE W. 
KANTER. STEVEN J. 
KATZ. MICHAEL D. 
KOEHR. BRIAN 
KOLCUM. GREGORY J. 
KUMPF. MARK 
LABYAK. TERESA A. 
LANKFORD. J. MICHELLE 
LAVANDOSKY. KATHLEEN ANN 
LENOX. BRADFORD RICHARD 
LENTZ. FREDERICK CHARLES 
LONGMAN, AMY MICHELLE 
MABRY. ANDREA ROCHELLE 
MARTIN. LISA JANE 
MATTHEWS, SUSAN WYATT 
MAUNEY, MICHELE DENISE 
MAYO, DANA LOUISE 
MCANDREWS, ROBERT W. 
MCBRIDE, DANA LYNN 
MILLIKEN, BRIAN SHANE 
MOHAP. BECKY ANN 
MORGAN. THOMAS JACKSON 
MORRIS. BRIAN KEITH 
NACHMAN. BRAD JOSEPH 
NAUJOKS. MICHELE 
ONKS. ASHLEY LYNN 
ORTEGA. TERESITA 
PARRISH. ROBERT 
PENSYL. DAVID 
PETTRUNY. TERESA 
PHELPS. GEORGE 
POCOCK, KAREN 
POCOCK, KATHRYN 
RABIDOUX, BRENDA 
RALPH, STEVEN 
RAPCAVAGE, SUZANNE 
RILEY. PARRISH 



RODGERS. WENDY 
ROSSI. REGINA 
ROUSE. JEFFREY 
RUTT. MARY 
SCOTT. TRACEY 
SHAPIRO. LESLIE 
SIMMONS. GREGORY 
SIMONS. LISA 
SLAUGHTER. SUSAN 
SMITH. JONATHAN 
SPEIGHT, TAMMY 
SPIVA, BRUCE 
SPRINGER, JODI 
STAFF, GRANTLAND 
STEPNICK, ANDREA 
STONE. KEVIN 
SUTTON. JAMES 
SWAIN. CYNTHIA 
SYKES, JEFFREY 
TATE. DEBRA 
THOMAS. LORI 
THOMPSON, MATTHEW 
TILT, ELIZABETH 
TURNER, GERALD 
URMANN, EILEEN 
WALKER. DAVID 
WALKER, DONALD 
WANZONG, KATHLEEN 
WASHINGTON, DEBRA 
WATKINS, KIMBERLY 
WEST, CARRIE 
WIERSCH, MICHAEL 
WORKMAN, SHELL 
WORRELL, KRIS 
WRIGHT, CYNTHIA 
WUNDERLY, CHRISTINE 



Honor Graduates/93 



Junior Class Officers — Elizabeth Jenkins, president 
Mike Spitalney. vice president; Diane Humphrey, sec 
retary; Skip Davis, treasurer 



Michael Adams 

Kathy Adcock 

Jim Adkins 

David Ainscough 

Danny Alfred 

(\aren Allen 



Kent Allen 

Kerry Allen 

Andre a Anders on 

Lisa Anderson 

Heath Andes 

Fae Aquilizan 



Chris Arzadon 

Donna Ashley 

Steve Astirtiore 

Amy Atherton 

Andy Austin 

Tom Aye o< k 




94/ Faces 



I 



still Achieving, Still Pursuing 



Junior Class Sets Its Mark On Kempsville 



The juniors of the Class of 1985 are a 
unique group of people who strive 
)nly for the best. With a blue ribbon for the 
:lass Homecoming float and a first place 
rophy in the first annual Class Olympics, 
his tribe of '85 proved to be an enthusias- 
ic class and one of drive and persever- 
ince. 

Kempsville's first year with foamy 
lands and square buttons further demon- 
.trated a group of people that dared to be 
iifferent. 

As class participation grew, it became 
ncreasingly closer to Ring Dance time, and 
inticipation for the night as well as the 
ings grew ever stronger. 



When asked to comment on the success 
of the junior year, Elizabeth Jenkins stat- 
ed, "I think that our success was mainly 
attributed to the participation and unity 
felt among class members — we created 
memories together." 

Under the guidance of Ms. Barrett Thar- 
rington, the committee chairpersons and 
class officers were able to lead the class 
through a memorable junior year. 

With Elizabeth Jenkins as president, 
Mike Spitalney, vice-president; Diane Hum- 
phreys, secretary; and Skip Davis, treasur- 
er; this junior class completed a successful 
year achieving goals of the present and 
pursuing goals of the future. 




Fa rah Baig 
Michael Baiocco 
Heather Baker 
Andrea Ball 
Ray Ballance 
John Balmeceda 
Elizabeth Barclift 



John Barger 
Darnay Barial 
Cathy Barkett 
Collette Ba rnes 
Eric Barsness 
Drew Basden 
Debbie Baxter 



Susannah Baxter 
Amy Baydush 
Dawn Beard 
Jasort Beaton 
Chris Belcher 
Caren Bennett 
David Benson 



Kevin Bergstedt 
Marlyn Bess 
John Bishard 
Tom Bleh 
Tammy Bloom 
Laurie Bochert 
Chuck Boggs 



Paul Bogler 
Sam Bondurant 
Mark Boomer 
Mark Bowden 
Kimberly Boyd 
John Boyette 



Juniors/95 



Scott Bradshaw 

Lori Brandon 

Bill Breakfield 

Pat Brenner 

Joe Brewer 

Michelle Brines 

Michelle Brinn 



Denise Brown 
Eric Brown 
Susie Bruce 
Beth Bryant 
Jeff Bryant 
Kelly Bryant 
Nicky Bryant 



Mark Buchardt 

Monica Buckley 

Shelley Buckley 

Brett Bunch 

Danny Burkhart 

Daniel Burnett 

Sandy Burns 



John B yrd 

Greg Laddell 

Brian Cafritz 

Greg Cain 

Gary Caithness 

Liz Campbell 

Chris Capwell 



Abraham Caragan 

Andrea Carroll 

Chris Carter 

Pete Catalano 

Jackie Chan 

Brenda Chasse 

Kim Church 



Antonyms, Analogies, 

and Answers 

students Go MAD While Struggling With The SAT 



Sweaty palms, nervous stomachs, 
headaches — all of these symp- 
toms are characteristic of any student who 
takes the infamous Standard Aptitude 
Test, more commonly known as the SAT. 
Numerous hours of study are necessary to 
prepare. Many students attend study 
courses, while others attempt to memorize 
the hundreds of vocabulary words from 
SAT books. On testing days, however, 
whether the SAT is given at Princess Anne, 
First Colonial, or Granby, it becomes an 



insurmountable task to recall everything. 
Many people panic, and they succumb 
to the grueling pressures of the test. With 
seemingly impossible analogies, incredibly 
extraneous reading comprehension para- 
graphs, and unbelievable logic problems, 
students struggle their way through the 
three hour period. Unfortunately, the ag- 
ony does not end there. For the majority, it 
becomes necessary to take the SAT more 
than once, so in another couple of months, 
the cycle begins again. 




96/ Faces 




Although there is no way to determine the 
words which will appear on the SAT, Kirk Falk 
studies many sources to increase his vocabu- 
lary. 




Cindy Churchin 



Bruce Cinibulk 












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Jami Clamp 


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Joe Clarke 


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Pat Clarke 
Ricki Cochran 


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Sandi Cochran 
Mark Cole 



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James Collins 
Lana Collins 

Dan Comerford 
Pecanne Condon 
Mary Conway 
Ronnie Conyers 
Doug Cooperman 
Henry Copeland 
Renee Cote 
William Cottrell 



Juniors/ 97 



Tight Squeeze 



The Dilemma Of Being 
Caught In The Middle." 



(( 



Year after year, juniors face the prob- 
lem of being "caught in the mid- 
dle." They either are too young to be a 
senior or too old to be a sophomore, too 
young to drive their own car or too old to 
be driven around by their parents, too 
young to not have a curfew or too old to 
have a 9:30 pm curfew, too young to have 
the privilege of parking in the school lot or 
too old to ride the school bus. Juniors nev- 
er seem to be the right age to do anything! 
True, they now have the opportunity to 
abuse the degrade sophomores, but, in 
turn, they suffer the same kind of treat- 
ment from the seniors. It is definitely a 
frustrating year for juniors. 

However, the junior year serves a pur- 
pose for every growing guy and girl. This 
year they realize that they only have one 
more year till they are seniors. In addition, 
they identify their goals in life and strive 
for them. They also look back at their 
sophomore year and examine how much 
they have changed and matured in one 
year. It is a long and hard struggle for any 
junior, but, by the time the year is over, 
they will have learned and matured even 
more. 

As the year comes to an end, most ju- 
niors are anxious to move out of the mid- 
dle and move up to the top — the senior. 



Beth Cousins 

Amy Cowan 

Billy Cox 

Raymond Cronin 

Stephanie Cronk 

Joanna Crowley 



Loveth Cruz 

Keith Cunningham 

Kendall Cutchins 

John Dailey 

Leilani Danganan 

C.A Dankmyer 



Laura D'Antonio 

Keith Darrah 

Pat Daughtry 

Anna David 

Elizabeth Davis 

Harold Davis 




98/ Faces 



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Unlike most juniors, Lisa Emory is not bothered by 
being caught between seniors, Raymond Stone and 
Cheryl Brown. 



'**T"HW' 




Dawn Dean 
Denise Dean 
Mike Deel 
Christina DeJesus 



John DelCarmen 
Chuck Deloatche 
Robyn DeLoatche 
John DeLullo 



John DeMartino 
Scott Depta 
Beth DeRocher 
Barry Dickman 



Robert Dillman 
Christopher Dinsmore 
Russ Dodson 
Deanna Dohmann 



Darlene Doughtie 
Wendy Doughty 
Terri Drake 
Cathy Drewry 
Dan Driskell 
Ashley Dunn 



Keith Dupuis 
Bryan hason 
Elizatseth Eaton 
Swain Eller 
Amy Ellis 
Jimmy Ellis 



Sherry Eluto 
Maurice Emery 
Lisa Erttory 
Robert Engle 
Dale Fajardo 
Kirk Falk 



Junic)rs/99 



Cheryl Paris 

Eric Fatkin 

Cheryin Fentress 

Brian Ferguson 

Kevin Fijak 

Laurie Fimian 

Richard Fischer 



Troy Flippen 

Andrea Flood 

Dennise Flores 

Diane Fojtik 

Alan Fontanares 

Donna Forbes 

Julia Forehand 



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Geoff Fout 


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Kellie Foxwell 


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Carolyn France 


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Chris Francis 


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Amy Francisco 


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Becky Frazier 


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Tim Freeman 


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Suzette Frey 


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Merrill Friedman 


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John Fudala 


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Sarah Fussell 


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Becky Futrell 
Evelyn Galloway 


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Linda Gard 






Countdown To Ring Dance 



Juniors Hunt For That Perfect Date 



Beginning August 29, every junior of 
Kempsville High School faces a 
similar dilemma. Juniors must find a date 
for Ring Dance in March. Seven months 
may seem like plenty of time, but for the 
worrying junior, it is not nearly enough. 

During the first two months of school, 
juniors scout for prospective dates. The 
list should include good friends, slight ac 
quaintances, and total strangers. For the 
following two months, each junior narrows 
down the choices. By meeting the Strang 
ers, and getting to know the acquaintances 



better, one can eliminate the undesired 
dates from the list. 

Upon returning from Christmas vaca- 
tion, juniors panic and seriously consider 
that final choice. They think about how 
their date will look in a formal outfit, if 
their date takes a good picture, and if their 
date's hair will clash with the outfit they 
plan to wear. 

have their dates. With careful planning and 
a keen eye. the juniors will find that perfect jj 
date. \ 



? 



i 



lOO/Faces 



Anxiously looking at the <aU;ndar, junior Tom 
Hayrnes realizes his time is running out to find a date 
for Ring Dance, 





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Kellie Gardner 
Neil Gardner 
Scott Gardner 
Mike Garrabrant 
Reina George 
William Gerstein 



Jeff Gilliam 
Dan Ginn 
Chris Gladden 
Linda Gladstone 
Cindy Glick 
Sharon Goodman 



Mike Goodove 
Lisa Grant 
Mylisa Grehawick 
Kari Griffith 
Beth Gross 
Albert Gumabay 



Jenni Guyer 
Heather Haas 
Thomas Hagen 
Jay Hale 
Ron Hamel 
Elizabeth Hamilton 



Juniors/ 101 



Though not really hungry. Skip Davis and Scott 
Clark often satisfy their Big Wheel urges. 



Candy Hampel 



Ashley Hamrick 

Sallie Hanbury 

Priscilla Hardlson 

David Harrington 

Amy Harris 

David Harris 

Wanda Harris 



Angela Harwell 

Katrina Hastings 

James Hayes 

Tom Haymes 

Sean Hazzard 

Hardy Headden 

Colleen Hennessy 



Laura Hennessy 

Mark Henry 

Michele Hickey 

Cheryl Hicks 

Todd Hilton 

Rot)ert Hines 

Angela Hinson 



Deborah Hodge 

Sarah Hodges 

Terry Hoffer 

Kerry Hofheimer 

John Holromb 

Shellie Holman 

Randi Holmstock 









1 02/ Faces 






Rumble, Rumble, Rumble 



Kempsville Students Get The Munchies 




FOOD, FOOD, and more FOOD . . . 
Jimmy and his peanuts, Ronnie and 
his jelly beans. Strawberry and her short- 
cake, Garfield and his lasagna, and every- 
one's "cheeseburger in paradise." Eating is 
inevitable in this feast-filled world. 

No matter where we turn, we are over- 
whelmed by America's obsession with 
"stuffing its face." It seems little Johnnys 
everywhere are constantly being bombard- 
ed by Happy Meals and being plagued by 
Big Mac Attacks. 

Maybe this obsession is a psychological 
result — a habit instead of hunger. Many 
Kempsvillians are found heading out to Piz- 



za Hut or Mario's after football games just 
because there is nothing else to do. After 
school, instead of studying, students make 
7-Eleven "runs" and quick trips to the 
nearest Taco Bell, Zero's, or household re- 
frigerator. 

And why not? Most Billboards that we 
see and radio commercials that we hear 
while driving promote the consumption of 
food. Coupons buried in the depths of the 
daily newspapers and junk mail provide 
easier means to obtain the junk food, while 
television is forever hurling food into our 
lives, tempting those lonely tummies to go 
"Rumble, rumble, rumble ..." 




Sandi Hooks 
John Horton 
Melissa Houser 
Steve Howe 
Karen Howell 
Mike Hron 



Keane Hughes 
Tracy Hughes 
Peyton Hull 
Deane Humphreys 
Tom Hunter 
Lara Idsinga 



Tom Infantino 
Beth Isenhour 
Andrea Jadka 
Stephanie Jacobson 
Robin Jaffe 
Jill Jamison 



Elizabeth Jenkins 
Keith Jennings 
Cindy Johnson 
Noah Johnson 
Roger Johnson 
Jim Jordan 



Juniors/ 103 




Angle Joyce 

Jenny Kahara 

Brian Karl 

Sarala Katepalll 

Lori Kaufman 

Cheryl Keck 



Kathy Kelleher 

Robert Kelley 

Joe Kelly 

Paiqe Kelly 

Ray Key 

Pam Klehne 



Amy Klamerus 

Kara Knickerbocker 

Susan Koerner 

Jeanine Kofroth 

Yvette Kofroth 

Joe Kohn 

Rhonda Korahaes 















1 04/ Faces 



■ 11^ 





2W f) 



Grouping Together 







Kim Kozuch 
( heryl Krane 
Anna Krebs 
Diane Kronz 
Renee Lafond 
Jon Lamb 
Sheila Lancaster 



Patrice Landers 
Robbie Larmore 
Paul Lavondosky 
Vickie Law 
Michael Lawless 
Brett Laws 
Bonnie Lawson 



Abelardo Layola 
Paul Leccese 
Ty Lee 
Robin Legum 
Chris Lehman 
Debbie Lentz 
Scott Leonard 



Steve Levine 
Emily Lewis 
Wendy Lewis 
Laura Liles 
Chuck Lisner 
Alisa Little 
John Litzinger 



Which Clique Do You Belong To? 



A casual observer wandering through 
the halls of Kempsville High School 
sees many different groups of people. 
Whether it be before school, after school, 
or between classes, cliques can always be 
spotted. 

The most conspicuous group consists of 
those who choose a more radical style of 
dress. Their streaked hair and unique jew- 
elry make them more noticeable than 
most. They discuss such items as the up- 
coming Clash concert and the latest fash- 
ions available at Wave Riding vechicles. 

The surfers are closely related to the 
punkers. They are distinguished from ev- 
eryone else by their cars. A surfer's car 
always has surf racks on top and sand on 
the floor. Furthermore, a typical surfer has 
sun bleached hair and a dark tan. A passer- 
by might hear surfers debating about how 
tall the waves are at Croatan. Surfers are 
also interested in who is going to hit the 
beach at two o'clock when school ends. 



On the other end of the spectrum of the 
diverse groups at Kempsville are the band 
members. These people can be discerned 
from other students by their jackets bear- 
ing the band insignia. Another way to dis- 
tinguish a "Marching Chief" from the other 
students is to see if he is carrying a mus 
cal instrument, a flag, or an order sheet for 
the band's annual fruit sale. 

The students wearing letterman jackets 
or Varsity Club shirts are classified as the 
jocks of Kempsville. A jock can easily be 
identified by looking in his locker. If it is 
full of hockey sticks, tennis shoes, baseball 
gloves and duffle bags, one can be sure 
that the locker belongs to a jock. After 
school most jocks can be found near the 
gym waiting for practice to begin. 

These are just a few of the wide assort- 
ment of cliques that Kempsville students 
have formed. The variety of people en- 
hances the individualism and character of 
Kempsville High School. 




Juniors/ 105 



Cosette Livas 

Teresa Liverman 

Arthur Luce 

David Lutz 

Tina Luzzi 

Kevin Mack 

Billy Madison 

Kim Maio 

Cindee Mann 

Michelle Markham 

April Martin 

Steve Martin 

Tara Martin 

John Martinez 

Kim Matthews 

Kym Mattson 

Michelle Matuck 

Kristin May 

Kim Maynard 

Ginger Mayo 

Scott McAlea 

Caryn McBride 

Steve McCleaf 

George McCoy 



Lori McCoy 

Sean McGrath 

Jennifer Mclntyre 

David McLaughlin 

John McLaughlin 

Troy McPherson 

Terri Meehan 

John Melchers 




Mike Melnikoff 

Tricia Melton 

Chris Menia 

Cindy Midgett 

Jeanne Miles 

Andy Miller 

Kim Miller 



1 06 /Faces 



According To Murphy's Law 



You Know It's A Bad Day When 



There is a law known as Murphy's Law 
which states "Nothing is as easy as it 
looks, everything takes longer than you 
expect. And if anything can go wrong — it 
will, at the worst possible moment." Ac- 
cording to Murphy's Law, Kempsville stu- 
dents know it is a bad day when . . 
. . you get into your car to go to school 
and the car will not start. 
. . you break all records trying to get to 
school on time and after arriving at 7:54 
A.M. you find out that it is Saturday. 
. . the principal greets you at the door 



before school starts with an OSS slip in 
his hand. 

. . . you have to run 10 miles to school 
because your ride forgot to pick you up 
for school. 

you open your locker and all your 
books fall into the middle of the hall as 
the bell rings. 

Kempsville High School students may 
have their bad days, but they should 
always remember that the Law of Aver- 
ages prevails over Murphy's Law. 




Mia Milkr 
Susdn Miller 
Scott Mills 
Tommy Mlt< hell 
Robert Moors 
Sabine Morecock 
David Morgan 



Mike Morgan 
Michelle Morris 
Kathy Morrison 
Kris Morse 
Grant Mott 
Jim Murphy 
Bill Murray 



Mike Goodove realizes it is a bad day when his 
books pour out Into the hallway between 
classes. 



Juniors/ 107 



Stacy Musich 

Leslie Myers 

Jo Anne Napoles 



Dawn Nashwinter 

Brian Nelson 

Carol Neste 



Ricky Newton 

Doug Nichols 

Carl Nicholson 



Stephanie Nobles 

Caryn Nowland 

EvaKarin Oberg 



Maria Octavo 

Matthew Odietus 

John Olah 

Jun Ortega 

Andy Orts 

Sandy Orts 

Rod Osburn 

Lisa OtI 

James Owen 

Darrin Owens 

Sheila Page 

Catherine Palermo 

Michael Paller 

David Parker 

Richy Porter 

Steve Porter 



The juniors face a difficult choice before ordering 
their rings, but after combining their favorite stones 
and metals, the result will be a true ring of memories 




1 08/ Faces 




Ring Spree 



The Thrill And The Memories 

Let's see. What kind of ring should I get? That 
one is pretty. But what metals are there to 
choose from? Gold is nice, but a bit expensive. 
Look at all these stones. There are so many differ- 
ent colors. I like red. A ruby would probably be my 
best choice. Well, I don't know ..." 

Choosing a school ring is a dilema facing many 
juniors, yet for most of them, it is the highpoint of 
the school year. 'Getting a ring will be really excit- 
ing this year because there are so many new and 
different styles to choose from," states junior 
Stephanie Cronk. 

When they have ordered their rings, the juniors 
impatiently await Ring Dance. It is truly an event 
that lights up the year for the hardworking eleventh 
graders. Mylisa Grehawick reasons, "I think it's 
good that the juniors have something to look for- 
ward to " The junior Ring Dance, which took place 
at Holiday Inn Scope this year, was a time of excite- 
ment. The thrill of picking a gown or tuxedo and 
getting the corsages heightens the anticipation for 
the dance. For some juniors it is the first formal 
dance and many of them have counted the days 
until March 22, the day of Ring Dance this year. 

After the juniors have made their choice regard- 
ing ring styles and stones, they face months of 
waiting before receiving their class rings. Still, it is 
worth the wait because the ring signifies something 
really special. Sallie Hanbury states, "A class ring is 
a reminder of our high school days that we can 
keep all our lives." 












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Bill Patterson 
Greg Patterson 



David Peake 
Dorothy Pearson 



Adrian Peele 
Mary Pellingra 



Beth Pendleton 
Daniel Pennington 



Joy Perkins 
Jeffrey Perry 
Karen Pester 
Clay Petry 
Amy Phillips 
Forrest Phillips 
Ray Phelps 
Steve Pierson 

Mark Pineda 
Eddie Polfus 
Christopher Pope 
Christine Porterfield 
Mike Post 
James Potts 
Tanya Presley 
Rachel Price 



Juniors/ 109 



Weekends Were Made For Fun 



Students Count The Days Until Friday 



Stacey Prince 

Tom Proctor 

Carole Propster 

Sean Pryzbgl 

Bryan Pundt 

Mark Quinton 

Sarah Quinton 

Karen Rabidoux 

Steve Radigan 

Judi Radomsky 

Terri Ray 

Jim Rayburn 

Jimmy Raynor 

Renee ReDavid 

Kelvin Reid 

Kurtis Reiner 

Russ Reiter 

Greg Remy 

GIna Reyes 

Mark Rezas 

Peter Rezas 

John Richards 

Stephanie Riddell 

Rodney Riddle 

Kevin Riordan 

Lynn Ritger 

Sheila Rivette 

Michelle Roger* 

Chris Rollins 

Arthur R(X)le 

Richard Rose 

C C Roysler 



AS the Friday morning bell rings, 
those struggling to keep their eyes 
open arouse to the sound of the morning 
announcements: "During all lunches, the 
Junior class will be selling Foamy Feet to 
all those who want to step into spirit'. 
Attention all Seniors . . . there will be a 
Senior class party — excuse me — a Sen- 
ior class meeting Monday at 2:15 in the 
cafeteria. It is BYOB ... I mean, uh . . . it 
is bring your own buddy. Thank you and 
have a great weekend!" 

Excitement mounts as the word "week- 
end" echoes throughout the ears of each 
student. Everyone begins scheming to get 
the car and to stretch curfew to the last 
possible minute. 

What do people do over the weekend? 
During football season, many fans crowd 



the stands to cheer their team to victory. 
Those who prefer peace and quiet may 
choose to take a walk along the beach, 
listening to the sound of the waves break- 
ing on the shore. Some may take in a mov- 
ie, while others, compelled to satisfy their 
cravings for the munchies, may head to 
Chi Chi's or Bennigan's to indulge in a late 
night snack. Those who yearn to socialize 
may go "party hopping", while others, par- 
ticularly the rowdy type, may decide to 
cruise the strip and check out the "night 
life". 

Unfortunately, though, the weekend 
must come to an end. Inevitably, Monday 
morning arrives, and everyone must face 
the fact that the weekend does not last 
forever. 





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and a nnovie guide? 





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Tracy Rumpf 
Ken Russell 
David Ryan 
Amy Salmon 
J. Sammons 
Madia Sammons 
Robin Sanderlin 



Sam Sandler 
Robert Santa Maria 
Mark Satterfield 
Robert Savage 
Joan Schell 
Chance Schober 
Eric Schorr 



Ann Schneider 
Kristen Schneider 
Josephine Schumbrecht 
Adam Schuster 
Ronald Schwartztrauber 
Michele Scott 
Win Scott 




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Angle Segovia 
Mike Seligman 
Christine Sell 
Allen Shannon 
Staci Shirley 
Barbara Shourds 



Juniors/ 1 1 ' 



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Getting A License 



The First Steps To Driving 



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eceiving a driver's license is a very 
special occassion for every high 
school student. But first he must take the 
long awaited process that he anticipates. 
The first step in receiving alicense is to 
gain entrance in a driver's education class 
Getting the basic feel of driving is the basic 
goal of this class, but for those who have 
had little experience, it often takes many 
dreaded weeks. Curves seem to be a com 
mon obstacle for the inexperienced driver, 
causing other students to cling tightly to 



Lydia Shows 

Mark Shults 

Curtis Skolnick 

Nick Skottegaard 

Mike Slater 



the arm rest. 

The next step is heading out to the 
DMV's office and praying that you remem- 
bered everything that you have learned. As 
the license is finally in the grasp of the 
individual, a sense of accomplishment can 
be felt as he prepares to take his lemon 
home safely, if he makes it home. 

Finally, the last step is to show off the 
prized possession and tell the story of how 
the new driver received it. A deep breath is 
taken as a grin is given from ear to ear. 










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Kristyan Slayton 

Rhonda Small 

Kevin Sandy 

Heather Smith 

Jimmy Smith 



Lorenzo Smith 

Johnny Smith 

David Snapp 

Darrin Snyder 

Romona Sparks 



Russ Spear 
Lorl Spears 

Debbie Spence 
Judi Spilka 

Mike Spitalney 



Bethney Spivak 

John Sproul 

Wendy StampU- y 

David Stanley 

David Starling 



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Il2/F8ces 




Just to make sure that she remembered everything, 
Lisa Schmon gets some last minute instructions from 
the driver's ed. book. 




Tim Teegarden 
Beth Terray 
Dennis Thompson 
Maureen Thompson 
Adrianne Thornton 
Carlton Tignor 
Johnny Tincher 



Mary Tomesch 
David Tonkovich 
Melissa Tosi 
Chris Townsend 
Cindy Transeau 
Jerry Turley 
Gary Turlington 



Juniors/ I 13 




Ron Voelkel 

Sandra Wade 

Janie Walker 

Michelle Walter 

Allen Walters 

Debbie Wanzong 

Amy Waranch 

Jodi Ward 

Jimmy Waterfield 

Maria Watts 

Walter Weeks 

Kathy Weese 

Sean Weir 

Susan Wells 

Tammie Werbiskis 



Kevin Werner 

Kurt Werner 

Kelhe West 

Sheryl Wettering 

Kelly Wheeler 

Annette White 

Paula White 

Robert White 



1 14/ Faces 



Let's Make A Date 



\n Evening On The Town 



V/Li hile the typical high school girl 
WW may wonder if and when a guy will 
sk her out, the typical high school guy 
|nust consider many other factors. How is 
e going to ask the girl out? What will he 
o if he is rejected? If he succeeds in get- 
ing a date, where will they go, and can he 
fford it? 

For the guy, the most courageous part 
f dating is asking the girl out and receiv- 
^g a response. Much, though, has to be 
ut on the guy's opening line, because the 
Id, "Hey baby, let's hit the town Friday 
ight," doesn't seem to work anymore, 
"he guy's physical appearance when ask- 
ng the big question may direct the re- 
ponse in either a positive or negative di- 
ection. It is possible that good old Egbert 
night be turned down when Gertrude no- 
ices his red face and the increasing num- 
er of sweat beads on his upper lip. 

If and when a date is established, both 
he guy and the girl go through hours of 
rimping for the big night. Egbert must use 

more effective deodorant and mouth- 
ash for this special occasion, while Ger- 
ude must apply enough make-up to cov- 
r all blemishes and give her a rosy glow. 

The date begins when Egbert picks up 
jertrude, and they head off for dinner. In 



order to impress Gertrude, Egbert decides 
to dine at the Lighthouse, believing that his 
ten dollars will make it through the night. 
Luckily, Egbert avoids embarrassment by 
having his mother bring him some money. 
After dinner, Egbert takes Gertrude to the 
movies. Without consulting her, he chose 
'Dawn of the Dead. " Both soon realize that 
the content of the movie is not mixing well 
with their meal, and they decide to leave. 

Because time is important, the guy 
should try to get the girl home early 
enough to avoid problems with her par- 
ents. Egbert finally takes Gertrude home 
and walks her to her door step. Gertrude 
notices that Egbert is nervous as the sweat 
beads on his upper lip multiply. It must be 
time for the dreaded good-night kiss. Decid- 
ing that kissing Gertrude on the first date is 
too much, Egbert shakes her hand and 
runs for the car. 

The weekend has passed and school has 
started. Egbert arrives at school only to be 
greeted by a number of Gertrude's friends 
who tell him what a shnook, he was Friday 
night. For most guys, this is a sure sign 
that the girl thinks you are a creep. Oh 
well, maybe Egbert will have better luck 
with Bertha next week. 




T,J Whitehurst 
Scott Whittier 
Cynthia Wiersch 
Sandi Wilkinson 
Randall Willard 
Anna Willianris 



Janel Williams 
Johnny Williams 
Nik Williams 
Rick Williams 
Julie Wilson 
Michele Winslow 



Cathy Winstead 
Tony Wise 
Stacey Wolcott 
John Wood 
John Wood 
Brice Wooidridge 



Jeff Wray 
Alex Young 
Todd Young 
Brian Zerwood 



Juniors/ 1 15 



Pam Agbuya 

Allison Ainscough 

Norm Akey 

Valerie Allen 

Gina Amato 

Kim Amber 

Ricky Amos 

Liz Annett 

Robert Antonio 

Mike Armour 

Shane Arnold 

Gianna Artrip 

Theresa Atkins^ 

Brian Austin 

Nathan Austin 

Suzie Azar 

Dawn Bailey 

Nat Bailey 

Maryann Baiocco 

Karen Baker 



Joe Bannister 

Laura Barboo 

Danny Barham 

Tara Barker 

Chris Barnard 

Allen Barnes 

Asa Barnes 

'-'"■■V Hiifnf^ 

Kdfin Barnes 

Mike Baron 

Martin Barritt 

Jim Bartlemay 

Tara Barton 

Stefanie Bates 

Beth Beaney 

Todd Beck 

Bill Becker 

Beth Bell 

Brod Bello 



Goal-An Unforgettable '86 



Working Today For Tomorrow 



The Student Council Association was 
developed in order to demonstrate 
self-government to students. As a governor 
is the liaison between people and the gov- 
ernment, an S.C.A. officer is the link be- 
tween the students and the faculty. Not 
only must he link students to faculty, but 
he must also raise money for various ac- 
tivities and motivate school spirit among 
the student body. 

The sophomore class officers were: 
President Laura McLaughlin, Vice Presi- 
dent Anne Slaughter, Secretary Elizabeth 
Geddie, and Treasurer Eileen Mullaly. Un- 



der the supervision of their sponsor, Ms. 
Karcher, these officers led their class 
through an exciting first year of high 
school. 

"One major goal was to build the class 
treasury so that when we are juniors we 
can have a fantastic ring dance," com- 
mented Laura McLaughlin. In order to raise 
money, the class of '86 arranged to sell 
candy, tee-shirts, and carnations. The offi- 
cers put in many hours of hard work and 
creativity for their cause, which is to make 
the upcoming senior year for the class of 
'86 unforgettable. 





f^ ^ A /^j 




I 16/ Faces 



The sophomore class officers — Vice President Anne Slaughter, Presi- 
dent Laura McLaughlin, Secretary Elizabeth Geddle, and Treasurer 
Eillen Mullaly. 



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Cristal Bennett 
Miriann Bercier 
Mark Beshirs 
Megan Bickerstaff 
Larry Biesecker 
Patricia Black 
William Blackburn 
Chris Blair 

Ed Blair 
Chris Blanto n 
Bev Blount 
Randy Boe 
Tami Bone 
Lauren Booth 
Amy Bordy 
Caroline Bowe 

Charles Bowers 
(Rebecca Boyette 
Robby Boyle 
Alvin Boynton 
Kimberly Brafford 
Eric Braun 
April Brinn 
Lori Britton 

Jason Brockman 
Doug Brooks 
David Brown 
Diane Brown 
kat tsrown 
Melissa Brown 
Randy Brudzinski 
Teresa Bryan 



Kristen Bryant 
Jack Buchannan 
Cathy Bukovac 
Todd Burgess 
Jean Burlamachi 
Lora Burns 
Rod Burns 



Sophomores/ 1 1 7 



The Typical Note 



Hey Buster! 
Hi! What are you doing? Not much 
here. I'm in Health listening to my teacher 
talk about Drivers Ed. What's a clutch any- 
way? So how do you like your first week of 
high school? My first week was great. The 
school is so big and confusing though, I 
must have gotten lost at least five times. 
There are so many people (especially of 
the opposite sex)! I'm going crazy. Yester- 
day I asked this guy (he looked like a sen- 
ior) if he could help me find my biology 
class, and do you know what he said? He 
said, "no"! Can you imagine, a senior actu- 
ally talked to me! I almost died! I've been 
looking all week and I still haven't found it. 



Steve Butcher 

Thomas Cain 

Benjie Caldwell 

hancy Campbel l 

Paul Campbel l 

Bill Cannon 

Cara Cannon 



Could This Be Yours? 

Every time I ask someone, they always 
give me the wrong directions. I hope they 
tell us where it really is soon. I hate carry- 
ing all my books up the stairs every day. 
By the way, where is your locker? The hall 
that mine is in hasn't been used for at least 
the past ten years. The first day of school I 
had to break through the cobwebs to get to 
it. And talk about out of the way. The 
stupid thing might as well be on the roof! 
Oh no! Here comes the teacher, so I'd 
better go. Don't forget to write me back. I'll 
call you tonite. 



Love ya like_a^ister. 



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ke a sistery 
Lou Lou (OO -^^.v 




Jennifer Carmack 



Bob Carmine 

Amy Carpente r 

Laurie Carpenter 

Tina Carpenter 

James Carr 

Kifithlfgn Pnrr 

Robert Carriker 

Sharon Caskey 




Ronald Castaneda 

Matt Chamberlain 

Matt Chapman 

Jeff Capelle 

Karen Chasse 

Karen Chaves 

Mac Church 

Reggie Claar 

Julie Clark 

Reqina Clark 

Bobby Clarke 

Elizabeth Clarke 

Kimberly Clemons 

Lydia Cockey 

Claiborne Cofer 

Ronald Cofer 



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1 18/ Faces 



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Greg Caddell. Wendy Stampley, and Barry Dickman 
road a "typical note" with fascination. 







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Thomas Colucci 
Donna Colvin 
Mat t Comerford 
Jul[e~Lomess 



Darrell Compton 
Jared Conley 
Ronnie Concepcion 
Tina Conrad 



Brian Cook 
Glenn Cooper 
Pat ty Co oper 
AlocLie-tD'sfoi 
Elizabeth Cowan 
Wendy Cox 
Regina Creek 
Frank Cross 

Chris Crowder 
John Crunk 
Robelei Cruz 
Joyce CulveT 
Christi Cummings 
Michelle Curran 
Michalle D aikos 
Debbie Dale 

Lisa Dana 
JoAnn Uanganan 
Lori Daughe rty 
Mike Davis 
Matt Dean 
Peter DeAngelo 
Kevin Deegan 
Barbara DeBlaker 



Jay DeJesus 
Marc DeJesus 
Julian Deluna 
David DelVecchio 
Joe Dennie 
Cheri Dewberry 
Dawn Dickerson 
Charles DiMarco 



bv^clo 



Sophomores/ 1 19 



Laura Lee tends goal for her P.E. soccer 
team. Because of her team's skill, though, 
she was often left alone at one end of the 
field. 



Mike Dimmer 
Lori Dodge 



Debbie Dolin 
Brooke Donahue 



Michelle Dorland 
heil Doqhtie 



Jeff Douglas 
Thomas Doyle 



Wendy Doyle 
Holly Duncan 



Bryan Dunn 

Michael Dunn 

Denise Duorte 

Dee Dee DuPuis 

Chris Durand 

Sama ntha Durkee 

Kim Durney 

Mark Elliott 

Darren Ellis 

Sheri Emerson 

Simon Eng 

Robert Enslin 

Vicki Erb 

Lori Erny 

Kathleen Escucha 

Don Espitia 

Amos Evans 

Mark Evans 

Holly Falch 

Eric Feeney 

John Feigenbaum 

Jeff Fentress 

Jody Ferrari 

Bobby Fields 



Jeff Fike 
George Filomarino 
Sue Flagg 
Ron Flatly 
Chris Flint 
Ken Flora 
Billy Fone 

lalt Fore 





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Off The Sneakers 









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So you have finally made it to high 
school, and in turn, have gained a 
new schedule with more important, career- 
oriented classes. But, there is one snag in 
your new routine — Physical Education. 
Three days of every week during the 
year, a sophomore must shed the clothes 
so carefully put on that morning and put 
on a grubby pair of blue shorts and red 
shirt. As a sophomore stands outside try- 
ing to kick a soccer ball in a temperature of 
forty degrees Farenheit, he is filled with 
anger as he ponders why he is required to 
take P.E. during his important high school 
career. After loyally dressing out and run- 
ning about a field for three years at the 
junior high, it is not easy to understand 
why it is necessary to prolong the course 
for another year. Students recognize that 



the two health days of each week are im- 
portant, because they provide the drivers 
education course necessary for obtaining a 
driver's license, but this is the extent of 
interest for most involved. Many feel that 
the time used for P.E. activities could be 
put to use learning something more useful, 
Alas, a sophomore must live through 
this hardship since the Virginia Beach 
school system requires P.E. in the tenth 
grade. Actually, there is a light at the end 
of the tunnel. Though P.E. is a relatively 
easy course allowing a student to alleviate 
stress for one short bell, most sophomores 
are running through that tunnel as fast as 
they can, only to reach the end and then 
wish they could turn and go back to their 
leisurely sophomore year. 



Amy Forehand 
Jenny Forest 
hicki Fortune 



Keith Foster 
Denny Fox 



Amy Franklin 
Bruce Franklin 
David Franks 
Jack Freeman 
Sheri Friedman 
Matthew Friesz 
Sandra Fulk 
Debbie Fulkerson 



Tammy Gardner 
Anna Garrison 
Kenny Gatdula 
Elizabeth Geddie 
Ella George 
John George 
Denise Gibson 
Lisa Gibson 



Christin Gilbert 
David Gilbert 
Colleen Gillen 
Dante Gilmore 
Bobbie Qiroux 
Sean Goddard 
Larry Goff 
Zabrina Gonzaga 



Jay Gonzales 
Bobby Goodvk'in 
Jennifer Gore 
Ricky Gozum 
Alex Graf 
Adrienne Grant 
Brian Gray 
Wendy Halbraith 



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Sophomores Face Another Year Of P.E. 



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Sophomores/ 121 



They're In The Money 



Money Makes The World Go *round 



Sophomores must raise money to sup- 
port their class activities as do the 
junior and senior classes. The money that 
sophomores raise is used for publicity and 
making the Homecoming float. Sopho- 
mores must also raise money for the fol- 
lowing year when funds will be needed for 
their junior activities. 

"We need to raise money in order to be 
financially secure for our junior ring 
dance", says Lauri Labyak, chairman of 
the sophomore fund raising comittee. 

This year the sophomore class sold car- 
nations, Reese's cups. Chocolate Santa 
Clauses for Christmas, and pom poms dur- 
ing the winter sports season. Each sale 

Susanne Greene 



was successful and brought in a great deal 
of money. 

The sophomores, however did face prob- 
lems with their fund raising efforts. 

"Our main problem," says Lauri La- 
byak, "was getting the students interested 
and involved." 

But that problem was overcome with a 
little publicity. 

The sophomore class, sponsored by 
Mrs. Karcher, was successful in raising 
enough money to support class activities 
this year. A large portion of the money, 
however, will be used to fund next year's 
junior class activities. 



Sherry Grice 

Tammy Grob 

Carol ine Grubbs 

i_olete Gualtieri 

George Guindon 

Bryan Guthrie 

David Guyton 



Chris Haas 

Brian Hadley 

Cheryl Hadley 

Kirk Hagy 

Amy Haiden 

Mike Hall 

Richard Hall 

Brandon Hamilton 

Tina Hamilton 



Cindy Ha mmonds 

Leigh Hannah 

Serena Hannah 

Kip Harbison 

Lynn Hardin 

•C^do^ "sV. if' Susan Hardv 

Amy Harrell 

Ann Harrington 

Greg Harris 

Kerrie Harris 

Brian Harrison 

Mark Hayms 

Holly Henderson 

Susan Hendricks 

Caroline Hendrix 





Ken Hennesay 

Caroline Henry 

David Henry 

Buddy HiatI 

Mike Hilton 

Paige Hobbs 

Jennifer Hodges 



1 22/ Faces 










April Brinn prepares a banner for a sophomore class 
fundraising project. 



Michelle Hoiness 
Linda Holbert 
Shela Holliday 
Annette Holman 
Emily Holman 
Robert Holt 



Wendy Holter 
Justine Homer 



Heidi Hoppe 
Chris Horner 
Kyle Horton 
Adrienne Howell 
Rene Howie 
Susan Hsu 
Scott Huf ton 
Danny Hughes 

Tammy Hughes 
Anna Hugo 
Shawn Hulett 
Jillian Humerick 
Kevin Hudson 
Belinda Hurst 
Tye Hutcheson 
Glenn Hutchins 



Ned Hux 
Al Igana 
Sabrina Inscore 
Robert Jaecques 
Jene Jaggers 
Stephanie James 
Michael Jeffries 
Phillip Jenkins 



Wendell Jenkins 
Jennifer Jennings 
Angela Jernigan 
Bonnie Joe 
Chris Johnson 
Earl Johnson 
Holly Johnson 



Sophomores/ 1 23 



Melissa Johnson 
Scott Johnson 



Beth Johnston 
Jeannine Jones 



Michelle Jones 
Rebecca Jones 



Tracy Jones ^^ 

Chuck Josh 



Marsha Jury 

Brent Kaiser 

Shelly Kaiser 

Lisa Kanter 

Sharada Katepalli 

Chris Keel 

Bill Keen 

Marjorie Kelly 



Donald Kamp 

Mike Kennedy 

Jimmy Key 

Richard Kidd 

Albert Kim 

Stephanie Kim 

Troy Kingsbury 

Robin Koch 

Steve Koeppen 

Mike Kohn 

Tonia Kolantis 

Brenda Kolcum 

Adam Kolodny 

Craig Koschel 

Nancy Kravitz 

Tracy Kreider 

John La barge 

Lauri Labyak 

Donald Lane 

John Langhorne 

James Lapp 

William Larkins 




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124/ Faces 



My First Big Concert 



I aoing Def With Leppard 



I t's 2:15 — All right! School is over! It's 
I Friday, and I'm headed for the Coliseum 
3 see Def Leppard in concert. I can't wait, 

s my first big concert! 

4:00 — I'm ready, I've got my ticket, my 
noney, and I just can't wait! I think my ride 
s here; I'm on my way. 
, 5:00 — I can't believe it — I'm here! It 
iook forever to get here; what a traffic jam! 
jhere sure are alot of people here. I've 
lever seen such a crowd. I guess we'd 
letter find seats before all the good ones 
re taken. 

7:30 — Since the lights went out the 
oncert must be starting. People are 
creaming everywhere, and everyone is 
icking their bics! Def Leppard is on stage 
ow and are playing their opening song. 

8:00 — This has got to be the loudest 



noise I've ever heard! I've got to go outside 
to get away from this. All I can hear is 
fuzzy guitar sounds and alot of screaming. 

10:00 — My friends seem to be enjoying 
all of this noise. I can't believe it! I think I'm 
going deaf. It's just too loud. I wish the 
concert would end. It's been going on for 
almost three hours now, and I'm getting 
sick. 

10:30 — I'm go glad this concert is over. 
I can't wait to get home! My ears are ring- 
ing so much that I can't hear anything else, 
and my eyes are tearing up from all of the 
smoke. Before I go, I've got to get a Def 
Leppard T-shirt, a tour guide, a button, a 
sweatshirt, and a poster. 

/ 1:00 — it's great to be home, but I just 
can't wait to tell my friends what a great 
time I had at my first concert! 




m .: -w^vrr- 







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Leeny McCabe 
Kyle McAfee 
Robin McConnell 
Eric McDonnell 
Harold McDuffie 



Mike Lavender 
Clifton Lee 
Laura Lee 
Luray Lehmann 
J J. Leonard 
Rod Ligart 
Jeff Lister 
Nickie Livas 



Carrie Loflin 
Jeff Lofir 
Tim Lovelace 
Dawne Lovelady 
Lance Lovelady 
Brad Lownsbury 
Michelle Lowry 
David Ludena 

Brent Lumpkin 
David Luper 
Patrick Lynn 
Tammy Lynn 
Steve Lyons 
Jim Lytle 
Jim Mason 
John Mason 



Rebecca Matney 
Jim Matter 
Anita Matthews 
Tammy Matu ck 
Heather Maxwell 
John Maynes 
Keith McBride 
Karen McCabe 



Sophomores/ 125 



In a friendly pizza parlor a typical scene is when your 
buddy eats more than he paid for. 



Mark McGarity 

Greg McGlone 

Matthew McGregor 

Dianne McGuire 

Laura McLaughlin 

Shannon McMakin 

Joe McNulty 

Wendy McVey 



126/ Faces 




Tom Messier 

David Micheal 

Gary Middleton 

Amy Miller 

Anne Miller 

Carole Miller 

Greg Miller 

Mike Miller 



Tim Mi 

Pam Millhouse 

Erik Milliken 

Mike Miza l 

Beth Moore 

Billy Moore 

FellSlCIa Mo ore 

Sheran Moore 



Thomas Moore 

Theresa Morean 

Chuck Morrison 

Lori Morrison 

Brian Morse 

Jennifer Morse 

John Mosteller 



Gary Moyer 

Eileen Mullaly 

Judti Mun(ji ) 

Tracie Murdi-n 

Jennie Murphy 

'V>-cV:>>W~ Valory Myers 

Christie Mabry 



Socializing With Pizza 



Seniors, Juniors And Sophomores Love Pizza 



What are you doing after the football 
game? This question is often 
asked during the closing minutes of a 
home football game. Friends gather around 
hoping to make some last minute arrange- 
ments, while others face it along hoping 
that their buddy will be at the same place 
that he is going. 

The typical Kempsville scene and tradi- 
tion started a few years ago when Kemps- 
ville's football teams finally had a winning 
season and were looking for a place to 
celebrate their victories. Milton's Pizza was 
the logical choice since it was only a walk 
away. Recently the place has been mobbed 
by the underclassman and junior high stu 
dents who were also looking for a Friday 
night out. Many seniors were tired of wait- 
ing outside to get a meal. The seniors need- 



ed a place of their own where friends of all 
kind could socialize without the hassle of 
running into a sophomore. But what could 
take place of Milton's? Seniors searched 
and finally found two alternatives — Pizza 
Hut and Larkspur's Milton's (now Mario's 
Pizza). Now seniors were able to eat a pizza 
without having to stand up. 

Many other juniors and sophomore de- 
cided the Milton's hassle was too much to 
handle and also decided to move their loca- 
tion. How juniors and sophomores alike 
also join the seniors at Mario's and Pizza 
Hut. Will the underclassmen again force 
the seniors to look for a new place to eat? 
Probably Kempsville's after-game activi 
ties have been based on pizza, pizza and 
more pizza. The seniors may suffer, but the 
pizza business sure won't. 




Noelle Macaraeg 
Doug Macdonald 
Michele Mack ay 
Julie Macklntire 
Dinna Mango 
Maureen Maher 
Ceasar Mamplata 
Jeff Mandel 

Marlene Man qosing 
Laura Mann 
Peter Marchesani 
Sfianon Marchiman 
Robin Markland 
Jacob Markowitz 
Jeff Martin 
John Martin 

Kara Martin 
Kim Martineau 
Susie rSewbold 
Laura Newby 
Cfiris Newton 
Jerry Ng 
Micheal Nixon 
Duane Noblick 



Pete Omberg 
David O'Mead 
Sean ONeil 
Tony Orlando 
Micheal Osbor ne 
Jenna O stberg 
Steve Owen 



Sophomores/ 1 27 



Brian Hadley experiences all of the trials involved 
with being a "typical" sophomore 



Randy Padilla 

Lynn Painter 

David Palmer 

Perry Pascual 

Debbie Patterson 

Kim Patterson 

Edward Pelina 

Tony Pellingra 

Elizabeth Permenter 
Trina Sawyer 
Valerie Perreault 
Wendy Perry 
Heather Petry 
Mark Pezzella 
Mike Phillips 
Tony Picardo 

Melissa Pierce 

Randall Pierce 

Reed Pierce 

Aris Pineda 

Eiisa Placides 

Henry Pogorzelski 

Nancy Porter 

Sandy Powell 

Caroline Power 
Vanessa Preston 
David Pributsky 

Kinp Prire_ 
David Pricenski 
Christine Prince 
Suzanne Quillin 

Damie Quinlan 

Debbie Quinn 

Susie Raiter 

Blaine Ramey 

Dale Rankin 

Shelley Rankin 

Michelle Raptavage 

Mary Rd IV 

Dean Ravizza 







128/ Faces 



Are You A Sophomore? ^e 






I 



Tenth Graders Fit The Sophomore Mold 



' \/ hile nearly one Kempsville student 
f W in every three is a sophonnore, 
tese students remain a breed apart. The 
phomore has many distinguishing char- 
, teristics and can easily be recognized 
andering throughout the school. The 
iphomore is the student who 

. . struggles with all the books he 
needs throughout the day, because it is 
impossible for him to get to his locker 
during school hours. 

. . frantically seeks his classes on the 
first day of school, bewildered, lost, and 
scared. 

. . carries his dirty gym clothes around 
with him in a plastic bag because they 
need washing. 



. , . describes the previous bell's driver's 
ed. accident while breaking into a cold 
sweat. 

. . . totes the tattered but relatively uno- 
pened copy of Julius Caesar to English 
with him for an entire grading period. 
. . . discusses with friends the numerous 
literary merits of "The Rocking Horse 
Winner." 

. . . makes the interminable trek to his 
locker twice a day; the second time only 
to discover he has left his books in the 
driver's ed. car — the one he wrecked. 
. . . falls out of the back of the bus dur- 
ing a fire drill and rips his pants. 
. . . carries his Mickey Mouse lunch box 
through the halls and breaks his glass 



thermos. 

. . . stands outside waiting for mommy 

or daddy to bring his health homework 

to school after leaving it under his 

Shaun Cassidy album. 

. . . shoots spitballs at the passing 

crowd during class assemblies. 

As sophomores, students experience 

many trials and tribulations, the fulfillment 

of their greatest fears, and often the fearing 

for no reason. Despite all this, there is one 

fact each tenth grader must remember: 

though it may be difficult to believe, every 

high school student was once a sopho- 







^ 


ft 


ft 



Stevie Ravon 
Allen Rawlins 
Cathy ReDavid 
RoBert Reece 
David Reed 
Jackie Reed 
irR~Reid 
Tracey Riedel 

Ernest Retikis 
Nicole Retrauskis 
Sherri Reynolds 
Bethany Rice 
Karen Rich 
Martin Richards 
Beth Richardson 
Calin Riffle 



_Donna_Rin3er ^ 

Chris Roberts ^ 

Heath Robinson ^ 

Kristin Rogers ^ 

Steve Romine ^^ 

Lenoa Rondero li 
Jennifer^Ross 
John Roy ^f\ 

-n 

Candace Royster , 
Debbie Rozos 
Michelle Rubin 
Charles Ruchelmac 
Lisette Ruiz 
Michael Rumore 
Sharon Ruppe 
Susan Ruppe 

Gerry Rutledge 
jta cia Sadler 
Tern Sadler 
Salbert Salang 
Susan Sams 
Deborah Sargent 
Michelle Savage 
f\im Sawning 






SophomJ 



129 



From Two Wheels To 

Four 

Sophomores Learn To Drive 



Look out world here they come! Yes 
— many of our sophomores are 
permitted to drive as they turn sixteen. 

Behind the wheel instruction can be a 
traumatic experience for the inexperienced 
driver — not to mention the instructors. 

Here is a look at a day with Mr. Onedge, 
driving instructor, and his diligent but 
somewhat spastic student, Jane: 

Hello, Mr. Onedge. Yes, I realize that 
the gas nozzle is supposed to come out of 
the tank in order to replace it. Gosh, Mr. 
Onedge, I am truly sorry. I pushed it too far 
and cracked your tank." 

"Did you say turn left, Mr. Onedge? 
Right? — okay, but now we are on a one- 
way street. You are supposed to know that 
it is illegal to turn right onto this street." 



Kim Saylor 

Daniel Schumbrecht 

Anthony Schwartztrauber 

Ann Scott 

Craig Scott 

Suzanne Scott 

_MiUJ_Seibolt_ 

Charita Seldon 



Tracy Shank 

Eric Shapiro 

Jenn ifer Sheppard 

Tracy Sheilds^ 

Fran Sie bart 

Sam Sifford 



"Do not look so pale. I know I cannot go 
fifty miles an hour on Providence Road. Do 
you think I'm crazy? We are only going 
forty-five." 

"Hey do you know that you are a very 
nervous man? You ought to take a rest. 
Yes, 1 see the light pole! OH NO! I thought I 
had enough time to stop. Don't worry, I 
didn't get hurt. Did you? Your car is pretty 
messed up! Did we hurt the lightpole? Oh 
good, that would have just been awful." 

"Is my time over yet? Gee, you look 
better. The color has returned to your face. 
Oh, and don't worry about the car — Dad's 
a doctor." 

"Hey, I'll see ya' tomorrow. That was 
really fun. Only five more days! 



Patrick Siqier 
Michele Silva 

Julie Simmons 

Joel Singson 

Pam Shottegaard 

Monique Slagle 

Anne Slaughter 

Allison Smith 

Amy Smith 

Kelly Smith 

Kelly Smith 

Joe Smith 

Patricia Smock 

Cheryl Snow 

Michele Snukis 

Todd Soady 

Richard Soelberg 

Nancy Sorenson 




\imm 











130/ Faces 







^ 









r^^^^ '4^x: f^-s- 




r> 



ro 



^r^ 




Old Jokes Die Hard 




o 



S) ^"^^^ 






Sophomores Buck The Stereotype 



Laurie Gnderhill 

Rick Gyheiyi 

Paula Vaiden 

Jerome Van Oekel 

Deborah Van Saun 

Anete Vasquez 

Shannon Vaughan 

Hugh Vidos 

Christine Viernes 

Sheri Wallace 

Thomas Lee Wallace 

Steve Waick 

Carol Wales 

William Wall 

Terry Walls 

Andy Walker 

Richard Walsh 

Dana Walton 

John Waltz 

•Susan Ward 

Don Waskey i 

Ame Wasserman 

Cynthia Watkins 

Andrea Watson 

John -Weaver 

Teresa Webber 

Tom Webber 

Jeff Weeks 

Shannon Weeks 

- Wkti W l wn r r'ia n 

Jeff Weigel 

Julie Weinstein 



Dana Weittenhiller 
Fred Weldon 
Danny Wells 

— Je ff wg i sn 

Tina Wendt 

Kent Werner 

Wendi Wesberry 

Mike Wessel 



AS soon as this high school opened 
its doors, sophomores have been 
the object of cruel jokes. While many of 
these jokes are funny at first, they soon 
become cliche and reflect badly on the 
person telling these jokes. The most ironic 
aspect of sophomore jokes is that they are 
seldom true, and have nothing to do with 
sophomores. 

I. Old joke number one; The Elevator 
Pass 

Through the eighteen years of Kemps- 
ville's existence, few if anyone fell for this 
joke. Even a student of limited intelligence, 
sophomores not-withstanding, can't be 
duped by this obvious farce. The first rea- 
son is that a joke that is eighteen years old 
has probably been heard by each rising 
class. The second and most blantant rea- 
son is that Kempsville Junior High School, 



and Kempsville High School are structual- 

ly identical. How can there be an elevator 
in a school that is prototype of a school 
that has none? 

II. Old joke number two; The Lunch Box 
Never has any high school student in 
Kempsville brought a lunch box into out 
hostile lunchroom. 

III. Old joke number three; Sophomores 
carry a lot of books. 

Most juniors and seniors will tell you 
that the sophomore year is by far the ea- 
siest year, ergo, less books. 

The expression "Typical sophomore" 
has little merit of meaning. Each new class 
of Kempsville breathes into the school new 
life, new ideas from a new generation. A 
"Typical sophomore" is seldom typical; he 
is an individual and should not be judged 
by his class alone. 



f 



I 



S'^oWJ^ 








132/ Faces 





Lynn West 
Mark Wcygandt 
Kimbfrly Whalen 
Kdthryn Whitby 
Carolynn White 
Worman White 
Rhonda Whitley 
Michael Wiechman 

Eric Wieting 
Robin Wilkinson 
Darryl Williams 
Libby Williams 
Anthony Wilson 
Bobby Wilson 
Bobby Wilson 
Robert Wilson 

Robert Wilson 
Tim Winchester 
Matt Winston 
Leigh Wise 
Mark Witmer 
Carmen Wood 
Gregory Wood 
Keith Wood 

Valarie Woods 
Robin Woolard 
John Workman 
Steve Woolridge 
Steve Worrel 
Tim Worst 
Tracy Wright 
Lynda_Wunsch^ 

Daral Yamada 
Julie Young 
Kim Young 
Kim Zicafoose 
Amy Zimmerman 
Kelli Zmarthie 
Virginia Zulueta 
Kim Zwiebel 






Sophomore Jeff Goff pays the price for his new found 
maturity. 



Sophomore/ 1 33 




During a drama class, fellow Thespians listen well as 
Christine Sell recites her lines. 

Mr. Reade receives a Halloween Candy Gram from 
one of his students. The Junior Class sponsored the 
Candy Gram project. 



r r 




1 34/ Divider 







■Club Talk 



^'1%^ 



Kempsville, teeming with life, pro- 
duces everything from future world 
eaders to future actors and writers. Its 
:lubs and organizations range from bilin- 
gual scholars to musicians to business 
eaders to scientists to orators to athletes. 
These clubs are governed by the Inter-Club 
Council and provide a creative outlet for 
the students in the form of school activi- 
ties. 

Clubs also promote greater participation 
in school projects. According to Carol Fu- 
tral, Student Activities Coordinator, by par- 
ticipating in school activities, "... stu- 
dents are able to have more time to do the 
things they enjoy." Jill Jamison, a junior, 
agrees, saying, "What the classes teach 



jj^rL^ 



me, the clubs put into practical use." Oth- 
er students feel differently about joining 
clubs, such as senior Mary Goodwin who 
states, "I join clubs because it will look 
good on my activity sheet for college." 
Clubs and organizations help students get 
involved in the mainstream of student life. 
Dedicated club members frequently end 
up remaining after school for hours and yet 
rarely receive recognition. However, 
through clubs and organizations, students 
are given the opportunities to realize their 
strengths, to interact with fellow students, 
to learn more about their chosen subjects, 
and to gain experience that will benefit 
them. 




A FBLA member, Christine Johnson, practices her 
typing to Insure a prosperous future in business. 





Organizations/ 1 35 



f 
I 



Staff members, Kristin May and Elizabetfi Jenkins, 
spread yearbook utensils on the floor as they prepare 
to draw up their final layouts. 



Image-ry 



Annual Staff Creates 



i( 



Kempsville" Picture 



The Kempsville High School Image 
has consistently been popular with 
the students of KHS since it encompasses 
the entire student body and is representa- 
tive of one "Kempsville" year. The few 
students who create this annual, however, 
are often forgotten. The Image staff con- 
sists of approximately thirty individuals 
who were chosen at the end of last year by 
the future editors. The responsibilities 
shouldered by the staff included writing 
copy, planning layouts, and interviewing 
students, teachers, and coaches. It was 
necessary to complete much of the year- 
book work after school and on weekends. 
This year's co-editors. Matt Thompson 
and Teresita Ortega, were responsible for 
not only keeping the staff in check, but 
also planning and organizing the entire 
yearbook, assigning layouts, checking lay- 
outs, and mailing a deadline. They also 
were held responsible for all blunders and 
staff errors. Copy editors, Emily Bordy and 
Amy Gray, read, corrected, and improved 
all yearbook copy in addition to doing regu- 
lar layouts. Business manager. Brad Shaw, 
took charge of the ad sales, yearbook 
sales, and organized the Image's ad pages. 
Sponsor, Miss Robnett, worked with var- 
ious aspects of the Image as she checked 
proofs and copy and aided in balancing the 
yearbook budget. According to Teresita 
Ortega, "The '84 Image is definitely the 
product of a group effort." 




Back row Matt Thonnpson (Editor), Miss Celia Rob 
nelt (Advisor). Amy Gray (Copy Editor), Front row: 



Emily Bordy (Copy Editor). Teresita Ortega (Editor), 
Brad Shaw (Business Manager). 



4 



136/Organlzatlons 




"ront row: Emily Bordy, Lisa Spruill, Monica Buck- 
ey, Jenny Kahara, Eva Oberg, Fay Aromin, Lisa 
Aartin, Kristin May, Elizabeth Jenkins. Middle row: 



Amy Gray, Anete Vasquez, Debbie Lentz, Maureen 
Thompson, Amy Bordy, Maryann Baiocco. Back row: 
Brad Shaw, David Walker, Brian Cafritz, David Cap- 



well, David Lutz, Tina Luzzi, Marlbeth Francis. (Not 
pictured: Julie Clark, Rod Annet) 



Image/ ^37 



Elite Works Of Art 



Students Take Part In Award-Winning Magazine 



If your sinews are limp and reflexes dull 
and you're not into blood, tears, and 
sweat: 

If band and theater do not interest you at 
all but you want to contribute, then don't 
you fret. 

Submit to Kempsville's literary magazine 

Montage. 

It will accept you even if your jump shot is 

shoddy. 

As Editor Brad Nachman relates, 

"The author of the Montage is the student 

body." 

Quoth the Montage. "Give us your 
artwork, your short stories your pictures, 
your poems, your prose, your rhyme, your 
verse, your essays, tell us of your happi 
ness, your joys, or your woes " 

Brazenly painted in red, in front of the li- 



brary the Montage box bides. 

Like a sponge it saps and swallows the 

creativity of the school in which it is 

housed. 

It expels its colorful cargo in the Montage 

room where the works are digested, rated, 

and espoused. 

The editors, the reading staff, and layout 

people toil to produce a magazine of great 

reknown. 

The Virginia High School League rated it 

superior and exceptional all around. 

Kempsville has more to be proud of than 

fine plays and winning teams, 

there is the Montage, from the mind it is 

fraught. 

In literature, there is more than muscle 

could attain, there is truth, perception, and 

thought. 




Cathy Himchak. co-editor, reviews the schedule for 
upcoming Montage deadlines. 



The Montage creatively displays past works in 



front of Kempsville's lunch room. • ,^ J\ 




Montage Fditorial Staff — Back Row Suzy Honey Row Miss Stokey, I illy Chen. Cathy Him<hak, Susie 
Nannclle Cullom. Heather Baker. Vicki Chalfin Front Hoskins. Brad Nachman. Miss De Mers 



138/Organizations 



Lilly C.hf-n. Mr-liss^ (lonf^r^a, Kar^ Knit kerborker 
and M^jfy fioodwin rate subnriittcd works 




Another creative piece is submitted to the Montage 
by an anonymous contributor. 



Montage Staff: Back Row: Miss Stokey, Carol Donnar 
umma, Vicki Chalfin, Nannette Cullom, Brad Mach 
man, Cathy Himchak, Susie Hoskins, Heather Baker, 
Lilly Chen, Missy Brown, Kathy Wanzong, Kara 
Knickerbocker, Miss De Mers Middle Row: Diane De- 



bobes, Melissa Gonzaga, Mary Goodwin, Marichu 
Ocampo, Pecanne Condon, Zabrina Gonzaga, Jill 
Hummerick, Stephanie Bates, Matt Watson. 
Front Row: Suzy Boney, David Ludena, Brod Bello. 
Pam Agbuya. Katrina Hastings, Judi Hart. 



Montage/ \ 39 




A member of the Treaty staff gathers his thoughts 
and prepares to put them on paper. 



Front Row: Lori Spears. Angle Joyce, Dan Curran Second Row: Jill Carlton, Rochelle Mabry, Kathy Kellehe 
Suzanne Blevins, Chris Pope Third Row: Julie Warshaw, Audrey Helbig. Kathy Hollingsworth, David Beshir 
Maurice Emery, Bob Parrish 



MO/Organlzatlons 



« 



Here Ye! Here Ye! 



Treaty Continues With Excellent News Coverage 



Although it contains headlines, edito- 
rials, cartoons, and a sport's col- 
imn, the Kempsville High School Treaty \s 
nore than just a school newspaper. In addi- 
ion to regular features, advisory columns, 
ind coupons, the Treaty contains exclu- 
ive sections in which students and teach- 
•rs can voice their opinions on certain is- 
ues. According to senior class reporter 
"om Kaupas, "The purpose of the Treaty 
3 to inform the student body of multitudi- 
lous occurrences within its wingspan. 1 am 



really thrilled to be a part of the Treaty 
staff." 

The Treaty staff is sponsored by Mrs. 
Seeley who ensures that all of the dead- 
lines are met. Chief editors Audrey Helbig 
and Rochelle Mabry were successful in 
their efforts to produce a quality journal 
for the students of Kempsville. In-depth 
coverage on such areas as sports, music, 
and student activities provide interesting 
reading for the students and faculty. 

The editorial staff includes Charlene Pal- 



lett, Suzanne Blevins, Margaret Carriker, 
Angle Joyce, Chris Pope, Jill Carlton, Julie 
Warshaw, and Lori Spears. The editors' 
chief responsibilities are the layouts and 
the distribution of the paper. 

The journalism I students assist in writ- 
ing stories and provide new ideas. Togeth- 
er with the editors, the Treaty staff contin- 
ues to supply the school with excellent 
news coverage. 




hief editors Audrey Helbig and Rochelle Mabry work 
centime to meet the Treaty's deadline. 



Treaty/] 4] 



We Pass This Way But Once 



SCA Helps Create Fun, Lasting Memories 



The Student Cooperative Association, 
under the guidance of Ms. Lori 
Compton. is the organization promoting 
citizenship, scholarship, and unity annong 
the faculty and students of Kempsvilie 
High School. 

The theme for 1984, "We pass this way 
but once." was well-chosen. Realizing the 
importance of high school years, the SCA 
provided many activities in which all stu- 
dents could participate and create memo 
ries for years to come. 

Student Responsibility Week provided 
students with an opportunity to "Take 
Pride in Our Tribe" with skits, films, and 



the infamous Class Olympics, which 
stressed responsibility and honor. 

The festive atmosphere of Homecoming 
Week was climaxed with the parade of the 
court, the class and club floats, and the 
dance. 

Other projects sponsored by the SCA 
were: Teacher of The Month; "A Miracle 
on 34th Street," with the admission being 
one toy to be donated to "Toys for Tots"; 
Santa Pictures, with our very own jolly 
Merlin Swartzentrauber; and a service pro- 
ject for St. Jude's hospital in May. 

With the leadership abilities of Rob Da- 
vis, president; Theresa Fletcher, vice-presi 



dent; Mary Conway, secretary; Courtney 
Zierden, treasurer; Warren Christie, second 
vice president; Christine DeJesus, execu- 
tive council member; Sally Hanbury, ex- 
ecutive council member; Pecanne Condon, 
historian; and Jane Fuqua, parlimentarian, 
this year was successful enough to say 
that to "pass this way but once" was 
enough. 

When asked why he believes that the 
SCA was so successful Rob Davis said, "A 
large part of the SCA's success was de- 
rived from working closely together to 
achieve a common goal." 




This ye.if s St A nftii ers ,ini) executive rounc il tTiem 
bers were: Front row — Mary Conway, secretary 
Second row — Courtney Zierden. treasurer; Sallle 
Hanbury. executive council member: Jane Fuqua, 
parlimentarian: Theresa Fletcher, vice president: Pe 
canne Condon, historian Third row — Christine De 
Jesus, executive council member: Rob Davis, presi 



(tent. Warren Christie, second vice-president; Miss 
Compton, SCA sponsor 



Every sixlti IjcII the exec ulive < oiiiu il (jets together to 
discuss goals, projects, problems, and possible solu 
tions. 



142/Organizations 





^ 



n 



r 



Sophomore, Eileen Mullaly gratefully accepts her 
class's third place award in the Annual Class Olym- 
pics sponsored by the SCA. 



an executive council member. Sallie Hanbury 
arks diligently on many of the projects set forth by 
SCA 



SCA/ 143 



Working For A Purpose 



A Club For Every Student 



The Science Club. Key Club and BA- 
SICS Club are three of the many 
clubs that present students at Kempsville 
High School with interesting and creative 
after-school activities. Each club gives the 
student a chance to extend his interest and 
knowledge in certain areas. 

The Science Club consists of a group of 
students who are interested in the world of 
science. President Greg Kolcum states, 
"The purpose of the Science Club is to 
enhance our knowledge of the scientific 
world through observations and investiga- 
tions." The club has made scientific trips 
to a planetarium, NASA, and the Peninsula 
Nature and Science Center in Washington, 
DC. this year. In addition to the trips, the 
Science Club has participated in many ser- 
vice projects, such as helping a needy fam- 
ily for Thanksgiving and contributing to 
the Joy Fund at Christmas. The club also 



organizes parties that relieve the burden of 
everyday school life for the students. 

The Key Club is a service organization 
that is active in different schools all over 
the nation. In the club students get a 
chance to help less fortunate children. 
President Matthew Thompson states, "Our 
primary objective this year is service. We 
have worked hard in our community and 
have gathered much personal satisfaction 
through this." The Key Club has participat- 
ed in activities such as helping children 
with Down's syndrome play bingo, and aid- 
ing at the Special Olympics held for handi- 
capped children each year. They have 
been selling carnations, buttons, and T- 
shirts to raise money for their purpose. 

The BASICS Club is a Christian club 
that gives its members a chance to have a 
good time without being alienated because 
of their faith. BASICS stands for "Brothers 



and Sisters in Christ Sharing." The goal of 
the club is to maintain Christian ideals and 
values in the busy everyday school life and 
to permit students to meet with other 
Christians at Kempsville High School and 
other schools in the area. The club, which 
consists of students from any Christian de- 
nomination, participates in many activi- 
ties. This year it has taken part in about 
ten Christian concerts held in local 
churches. For Christmas the club adopted 
a family to ensure that they had a happy 
holiday. 

The Science Club, Key Club, and BA- 
SICS Club are three of many clubs of 
Kempsville High School that present stu- 
dents with educating, interesting, and cre- 
ative activities after school. The interest 
and desire to help others is what makes the 
all-around students of the school so spe- 



cial. 



It is time to leave after another busy Science Club 
meeting. Simon Eng starts to push his chair in to get 
ready to go. Being scientific can be hard, but it is 
always a lot of fun. 



Science Club — Front Row: Michelle Jones, Rebecca 
Matney, Cheryl Kolcum, Greg Kolcum. Chris Town 
send, Peggie Turner, AAike Wiersch, Kris Schneider, 
Maria Octavo, Dawn Madison Second Row: Perry 
Pascual. Melissa Gonzaga. Zabrina Gonzaga, Lilly 
Chen, Mary Ann Baiocco, Jackie Bunting, Eva Karin 
Oberg, Judi Hart, Mane Beasley, Laurie Lawrence, 



John Bianco Third Row Paul Reitelbach, Steve 
Kanter, Melody Paragas. Alan Fontanares, Mary 
Goodwin, Jeanne Miles, Lynn Onks, Kim Whalen, 
Wendy Galbraith, Mike Baiocco Back Row Sandra 
Cohen, Eileen Deegan, Diane Debobes, Kenji Toida. 
Jimmy Sung, Carlton Tignor, Abelardo Layola, Simon 
Eng, Jared Conley. Steve Pierson, John Balmaceda 







144/Organlzatlons 



President Matt Thompson listens to the club nnenn- 
bers' advice during a Key Club meeting. A lot of hard 
work is needed in the field of service There are many 
less fortunate people in our community and the Key 
Club is doing a great job in helping them. 




Key Club — Front Row: Wendy Gal 
braith. Michelle Markham. Alan Fon 
tanares. Karen Pocock. David Stubbs, 
Melody Paragas, Kim Whalen Back 
Row Mr Weaver. Laurie Lawrence. 



John Balmaceda. Brad Shaw, Jill Ja- 
mison, Kathy Pocock. Marie Beasley. 
Judi Hart, Beth DeRocher, Debbie Wan 
zong, Mr. Phelps. 



BASICS Club — Front Row: Wendy 
Galbraith, Kim Whalen, Cindy Watkins, 
Kathy Wanzong. Elisa Placides Second 
Row: Chris Newton, Sandy Whittaker, 



Jenny Valade, Beth Boette, Tara Bark- 
er. Kim Watkins. Kay Shows. Back 
Row: Heather Thompson, Patrick Lynn, 
Debbie Wanzong. 



Service Clubs/ 145 



The Brains And The Brawn 



Athletes And Honor Students Take Pride In Helping Others 




The National Honor Society and Varsi- 
ty Club recognize students who illus- 
trate notable accomplishments in academ- 
ics and athletics respectively. Both clubs 
encourage excellence in its members and 
stress the value of helping others. 

The Honor Society strives to build good 
character, develop leadership ability, serve 
others in school and community, recognize 
the achievements of its members, and pro- 
mote outstanding scholarship goals. Mem- 
bers of the Honor Society are selected on 
the basis of citizenship, academics, ser- 
vice, and leadership qualities. The Honor 
Society serves the school by providing a 
tutoring service, conducting a teacher help 
day for the last day of school, and painting 
the teachers' lounge. In addition, the Honor 



Society makes many trips to the Holmes 
Convalescence Center. Carnations and 
sweatshirts were sold in order to make 
these activities possible. 

Members of the Varsity Club include stu- 
dents who have lettered in at least one 
sport. The goal of this year's Varsity Club 
was to raise money for as many $300.00 
college scholarships as possible. Achieve- 
ing this goal involved several means of 
fund raising. These included cake raffles; 
carnation, mistletoe, and doughnut sales; 
and the sales at concession stands during 
sports events. The Varsity Club also set up 
the gym for winter sports and had two 
parties to help the members relax after all 
the tedious fund raising. 




Letter jackets, a fami 
modeled by Varisty 
Panikos Kyriakides. 



lar sight in the halls of KHS. are 
Club members Rob Hicks and 



Honor Society — Front Row: Susan Matthews. Chris 
Wunderly. Karen Colucci. Carrie West, Karen Pocock. 
Becky Mohap, Kathy Pocock, Teta Barry. Second 
row: Emily Bordy. Peggy Turner. Susan Slaughter, 
Craig Hudson, Brian Koeher. Lily Chen, Greg Kolcum, 



Barry Chovitz. Third row: Mrs. Bonney, Marilyn Dan- 
iels. Teresita Ortega, Lisa Martin. Theresa Fletcher, 
Kathy Wonzong. Diana DeBobes. Cathy Himchak, 
George Phelps. Brad Lennox, Brian Morris. Mike 
Wiersch, Rich Horsch. 



146/Organizations 



n 



:rs 




Mrs. Bonney discusses future activities with the Hon 
or Society. 



The select few members of the Honor Society plan 
meetings at which they think of many ways to aid the 
school and community. 




Varsity Club — Front row Debbie Lentz, Kathy Po 
cock. Karen Pocock, Carrie West, Mike Morris, Chris 
Barton. Becky Mohap, Tammy Ponder, Kristin May 
Second row: Steve Peters. Chris Francis, Warren 
Christie. Robert Davis, Joe Tinkler. Robbie Larmore, 
Chris Wunderly Third row; Robbie Hicks, Merlin 



Swartzentruber. Joan Schell, Sarah Fussell, Karen 
Chasse, T J Whitehurst. Pete Catalano. Sandy Co- 
hen Fourth row: Maribeth Francis, Terri Drake. Susie 
Walton. Kelly West. Suzanne Rapcavage. Dana Wal 
ton, Jill Jamison. Ashley Dunn, Beth Gross. Karen 
Colucci. Karen Rabidoux 



Service Clubs,' 147 



Sherri Friedman and Josie Schumbrecht are^lishing 
one of the chairs to give a final touch to the sets 
before the show. 




Sir Lancelot (Steve Skrapits) begs the forgiveness of 
King Arthur (Scott Clark) as a grave Squire Dap (Skip 
Davis) looks on during the spring production of Ome 
lot. 



Officers — Front Row D'Ann Gfumbach. Scott 
Clark Second Row Rich Horsch. Barry Chovitz. Mi- 
chelle Lankford. Teta Barry. Margaret Carnker, Bruce 
Spiva Back Row: Barry Dickman, Parrish Riley 



148/Organizations 




Behind The Curtains 



No Business Like Showbusiness 



ura Stanulis and Jeff Edney fiave to climb up high 

Iders to be able to draw the background for Camelot. 

working on the drama presentations they can acquire 

^; points needed to become a Thespian. 

f 



What is so special about being a 
Thespian? The International Thes- 
pian Society is an honorary organization 
that permits students to cultivate their tal- 
ents and interests in the art of drama. It 
requires hard work, but is also a lot of fun. 

Becoming a Thespian is not as simple as 
paying a membership fee. A student must 
give outstanding service in the field of the- 
ater. 

To receive the ten points required to 
earn the membership. Before the inaugura- 
tion ritual that takes place each year, the 
student, who is about to become a Thespi- 
an, perform a specific task. After dressing 
up as a character chosen by the Thespi- 
ans, he attends a complete day of school. 
Every time he is tapped on the shoulder by 
a Thespian, he has to sing the first verse of 
"There is no business like Show Busi- 
ness". After having memorized twenty 
lines by Shakespeare, the task is complet- 
ed and the student can receive the eagerly- 
awaited Thespian membership card. 

Being a Thespian involves different 
types of work. The theater productions 
which are presented each year include ac- 
tors, crews, sets, publicity, makeup and 
costumes. Melissa Houser, a costume mis- 
tress, states, "To me, being a Thespian is 



being able to change an old white sheet 
into a glorious Elizabethan gown." 

The Thespians present a play in the fall 
and a musical in the spring each year. This 
year, they were Skin of our Teeth and 
Camelot. Each year the Thespians also 
participate in the one-acts competition. 
The last award-winning one-act that 
Kempsville High School's Thespians com- 
peted in was last year with Runaways by 
Elizabeth Swados. This year Savage Love 
by Sam Shepard and Joseph Carkin was 
presented. Thespians also sponsor Ten- 
sion Night. This is a new concept that 
began on a small scale but developed into 
a big coffee house type production and has 
become a school-wide interest. 

Participation with the Thespian society 
is both on a local and national level. Drama 
interest has grown among students in the 
last years. The Thespians at Kempsville 
High School have become a big group that 
has a lot of fun in the midst of hard work. 
Sallie Hanbury, who had a major part in 
Skin of our Teeth, states "When some 
people hear the name Thespian, they auto- 
matically think we're weird, and we are, 
but few people realize just how involved 
and dedicated we have to be. 




ina Amato is only one of the many dancers who stretch 
h and struggles with her dance routine to get in shape 
jfore the show 



Thespians — Front Row: Parrish Riley. Scott Clark. 
Teta Barry, Michelle Lankford, Margaret Carriker, 
Barry Chovitz, Bruce Spiva. Cecilia Haro. Second 
Row: Mary Pellingra, Barry Dickman, Wendy Stam 
pley, EvaKarin Oberg, Sallie Hanbury, D'Ann Grum 
bach. Amy Francisco, Jennifer Mclntyre, Debbie Bax- 



ter, Tammie Werbiskis, Alan Fontanares. Back Row: 
Michelle Brinn, Pecanne Condon, Cheryl Strange, Mi- 
chelle Markham, Eileen Deegan. David Walker, Kris 
Worrell. Rich Horsch, Christine Sell, John Lamb. Regi- 
na Rossi. Suzanne Blevins. Chris Dinsmore, Michelle 
Walter 



Thespians/ 149 



At dress rehearsal, Mrs. Parker demonstrates the art 
of self-expression to the Show Choir members. 



44 



I Am 



Music 



jj 



And The Kempsville 
Chorus Sings The Songs 

Three units make up the Kempsville 
High School choral department: 
Show Choir, Concert Choir, and Girls' 
Choir. The chorus is directed and guided 
by Mrs. Parker. 

All the choirs shared their musical tal- 
ents with students, parents, and teachers 
alike during their public concerts. Their 
first performance, their Christmas concert, 
was held on Wednesday, December 14. To- 
wards the end of the year, the chorus de- 
partment held their Spring concert and 
also sponsored the Kempsville Variety 
Show in April. 

The most involved of the choral groups 
is the Show Choir. Decked out in their 
dazzling costumes, the members of the 
Show Choir sang for various service and 
community organizations. Early in the 
year they sang before the Virginia Beach 
Pops Concert and for the Virginia Beach 
dinner for Volunteers. Representing the 
true talent found at KHS, this musical 
group also competed at James Madison 
University in April. 




Bruce Spiva tunes in as other chorus members con 
tinue to sing "to their heart's content " 



150/Organizatlons 





Show Choir — Front Row: Jurell Mason. DAnn 
Grumbach, Regina Rossi, Valerie Todesco, Tim Love- 
lace, Mary Rutt. Bacl< Row: Kendall Cutchins, Hanl< 
WhJnery, Margaret Carrkier, Tracey Scott, Jim Miller, 



Michelle Lankford, Stephen Skrapits, Cheryl Strange, 
Jeff Darrah, Bruce Spiva. Sharon Goodman. Not pic- 
tured: Brian Cook, David Harrington, Brian Karl, Cindi 
Piver. 




Girls' Chorus — Cheryl Strange — accompanist, Jen- 
ny Forrest, Jill Springer, Amy rancisco, Fe Aquilizan, 



Kendall Cutchins, Sheran Moore, Christine Stoddart. 




Officers — DAnn Grumbach (treasurer), Valerie 
Todesco (vice president), Regina Rossi (president) 



Concert Chorus — Front Row: Jon Lamb, Susan 
Koerner, Sandi Burns, Malia Miller, Julie Commess, 
Sharon Brown. Regina Rossi. Second Row: Bruce 
Woolridge, Robin DeLoatche, Amy Klamerus, Shawn 



Marchman, Suzanne Quillan, Allison Ainscough, Dale 
Rankin. Back Row: Scott Gardner, Robert Foley. Amy 
Atherton. Robin Taylor. Regina Creek. Dawn Bailey, 
Julie Simmons. Lysa Flowers. 



Chorus/ 151 




step To 
The Beat 

Kempsville Band 
Knows The Score 

Stepping off in the right direction is a 
feat easily acconnplished by the 
marching band. The many individuals 
work together to compose a single musical 
enterprise, one that entertains and com- 
petes on the same field. 

Guided by director Ron Scott and drum 
majors Brenda Jones and Julie Swanberg, 
the members of the Kempsville band liter- 
ally "live, sleep, and eat" band. Much of 
their time is devoted to practicing for 
hours after school, performing at football 
games, competing out-of-town almost ev- 
ery weekend during the fall season, and 
then returning to only more practice. 

The band has competed at Mount Ver- 
non winning the first place band, band 
front, and drum majors trophies in the 
Class AA Division, along with the third 
place overall trophy. At the Virginia Band 
and Orchestra Directors Association com- 
petition held at ODG, the Marching Chiefs 
captured first place band and auxilliary tro- 
phies in the AAA division. The coiorguard 
also won second place in Lynchburg, while 
the drumline won second at Falls Church. 



Sophomore James Tynes plays the kettle drums 
during the concert numh>er. 



Drum major Brenda Jones directs the band during 
a halftime performance. 



1 52/Organlzations 




Theresa Flint awaits command from the drum 
majors while standing at attention. 



The members of the Kempsville Marching Chiefs 
stand as one. 



Band/ 153 



VICA: First row — Barbara Shourds. Tammy Valen 
tine. Kevin Cahoun. Robin Barnette. Jeff Permenter. 
Karen Manning, Karen Harris. Vickie Law, Teresa Li 
verman; Second row — Eric Farrar. Mike Satchwell. 
Eddie Polfus. Pam Brown. Dana Toxey. Jack 
Landers, Brian Proctor. Jeff Gillian. Scott Abshire; 



Third row — Rodney Riddle, A! Russell. Chip Lauger 
man. Steve Comeau. Johnny Smith. Chris Rollins, 
Robert Hasket. Steve Miller; Fourth row — Bubba 
Tatem, Joel Baydush, John Barger, Stewart Howard. 
Mike Cooke. John Fudala, Tom Bleh, Albert Guma 
bay. James Adkins 



I 




FBLA: First row — Stephanie Simon, Pam Millhouse, 
Diane Fojtik, Carol Rettie, Heather Black, Traci 
Jones, Michelle Scott; Second row — Marichu 
Ocampo, Nancy Santa Maria, Mona Lynch, Amanda 
Cummings, Serena Dulin, Julie Morgan. Lori McCoy, 
Janel Williams; Third row — Mrs. Helen Gavin 
(sponsor), Allison Ainscough, Debbie Waskey, Me 



lanie Coffey, Chrissy Aggas, Amy Dombrowski. 
Alana Mateling (Pres), Pam Agbuya (Reporter), Dawn 
Madison (Vice Pres). Carol Donnarumma (Sec), Sta- 
cey Rudiger, Shell Workman. Julie Warshaw, Julie 
Hudson; Fourth row — Tony Schwartztrauber. Mar 
tha Kubizewski, Patrick Lynn, Ronald Schwartz 
trauber, Lynda Richardson, Mrs. Judy Allen (sponsor) 




FHA: First row — Dorothy Pearson, Liz Fenton, Lisa 
Counts, Bonnie Beal (Historian), Kelly Dillman 
(Treas), Donna Forbes (Pres), Amy Arnold, Sabrina 
Inscore, Sandra Taylor; Second row — Angela Worth, 
Sandy Berry, Joyce Jones, Debbie Baily, Kathy Hoi 
lingsworth, Pat Barnes, Laura Liles, Patty Spade, 
Saphne Spain, Mitzi Siebolt, Stephanie Jacobson, Pip 



er Ferguson, Annelli' Whit.iker; Third row — Emily 
Lewis, Jurell Mason, Lori Morrison, Amy Dombroski, 
Marlyn Bess, Candy Lineberry, Kim Kozuck, Teresa 
Jensen, Pam McDaniel, Chaiki Dills, Angle Adkins, 
Sandi Burns, Jeannie Jones; Fourth row — Mrs. Cin- 
dy Sanoba (sponsor), Angela Segovia, April Carpenter 



154/Organlzatlons 



Clubs Prepare For The Future 



Dedicated To Serve School And Community 




DECA deals with a variety of students, some of 
which are enrolled in the Fashion Merchandise class 
like Angie Adkins and Chaki Dills. 

FBLA helps prepare students for jobs in business 
and Pam Agbuya is one of them. 



There are many clubs and organiza- 
tions at KHS. but four are somewhat 
different. VICA, DECA, FBLA, and FHA all 
help prepare their members for future jobs. 

DECA, or Distributive Education Clubs 
of America, is the only national youth orga- 
nization of its kind. It operates through the 
public school to attract students to careers 
in marketing and distribution. 

Members do not meet on a regular basis, 
but usually have meetings when they are 
working on a project. At the meetings, they 
discuss two types of learning experiences: 
1. Individual participation and writing 2. 
group activities and projects. 

Another club is VICA, or Vocational In- 
dustrial Clubs of America. Their officers 
are President, Robyn Barnette, Vice-Presi- 
dent, Jeff Permenter, Secretary, Helen Bu- 
chanan, Treasurer, Karen Manning, VICA 
meets once a month at a local restaurant 
to discuss training for ICT I and ICT II. 
Members attend competitions and state 
leadership rallies. 



Future Business Leaders of America, or 
FBLA is an organization made up of stu- 
dents who take business courses. FBLA 
meets on the first Tuesday of every month, 
when they discuss chapter activities. 
FBLA is active in five areas: developing 
business skills and knowledge, social ac- 
tivities, school and community projects, 
financial activities, and leadership and pro- 
motion activities. This year FBLA also pro- 
vided needy families with food for Thanks- 
giving during their canned food drive. 

The final club is FHA, or Future Home- 
makers of America. They do service pro- 
jects throughout the year, such as catering 
Homecoming. FHA meets approximately 
every two weeks unless they are involved 
in a project; then, they meet every week. 
Their overall goal is to help students im- 
prove personal, family, and community liv- 
ing. 

VICA, DECA, FBLA, and FHA are all 
very important clubs that contribute to the 
excellence of KHS. 




DECA: Kelly Copeland (Treas.). Jill Haverson (Sec), 
Heather McPartland (Pres.), Steve Fasanaro (V. Pres.). 
Patrice Landers (Historian); Second row — Mary Rutt, 
Amy Carpenter, Jodi Ferrari, Calin Riffle. Liz Fenton. 
Devon Spearman, Joanne Griggs. Cindy Witmer, An- 
drea Anderson, Hope Herritt, Cosette Livas, Kellie 
Gardner; Third row — Amy Baydush, Nancy Cam- 
bell, Stefanie Franklin, Amy Arnold, Tiffany Primm. 
Katherine Kuhnemund, Tanya Presley, Amy Wasso- 
man, Chrissy Porterfield, Ann Walker; Fourth row — 
Cindy Howell. Wendy Rogers, April Martin, Elizabeth 
Davis, Denise Flores, Jamie Clamp, Piper Ferguson, 
Wendy Lewis. Yvette Kofroth, Chuck Boggs, Laurie 
Bochert, Kathy Adcock; Fifth row — Tammy Bur 
dette, Paige Brice, Jill Comess. Glenda Jones, Suzie 
Sharpe, Kari Motley, Kim Kozuch, Lana Collins, Can- 
dy Hampel, Lorrie O'Neal; Sixth row — Pattie Mellon, 
Donna Loch, Sabrina Morecock, Bobby Clarke, Kari 



Griffith, Wendy Davies, Tanya Stubbs, INadia Sam 
mons, Lisa Cerchiaro, Gina Ferrari; Seventh row — 
Mellissa Tosi, Laura Liles, Amy Cowan, Ingrid Sved- 
berg. Amy Harris, Ashlie Perotta. Lynn Daughtry, 
Valerie Todesco, Kathy Hollingsworth, Michelle Dai- 
kos, Phillip Jenkins; Eighth row — Kevin Deegan, 
Brian Ferguson, Rene Howie, Belinda Hurst, Niki Per- 
tauskis, Michelle Sauge, John Horton. Tom Ford, An- 
drea Carroll; Ninth row — Arthur Luce, Carl Nichol- 
son, John Langhorn, Kirby Hagan, Ken Taylor, Shawn 
McGrath, Richard Fisher, Kevin Burnette; Tenth row 
— Troy Flippen, Craig Koschel, Toney Baker, Jim 
Matter, Billy Maul, Robert Kelly, Bruce Lytle. Mery 
Tomesch, Shawn Przybyl; Eleventh row — Patrick 
Brown, Marvin Lancaster, Brian Karl, Dan Rhodes, 
Scott Cummings. David Hutchinson, Robert Greene, 
James Miller 



Vocational Clubs/ 155 



Junior Doug Cooperman utilizes his drafting tools to 
complete an industrial arts drawing. 



Brian Szarnos, a member of the Video Club, operates 
the video recorder as a service to the teachers and 
coaches of Kempsville 



w 





Front Row; Jimmy Roberts, David Bell, John Bianco, 
Paul Reitelback, Robert White, David Gibbons Back 
Row: Mr. Sydow. Robert Santa Maria, Scott Leonard. 



Richard Horsch, Raz Bueno. Sean Marsh. Steve Se- 
karis Vyc Caroline, Stacey Prince. Jim Rayburn. 



1 56/ Organizations 



Juniors Henry Pogorzelski, Paige Kelly, and Robert 
5illman. work on perfecting their drawings for an 
jpcoming Industrial Arts Fair. 




dec Club: Dale Fajardo. Chiarlene Pallette, Beth 
chardson. Sallie Hanbury. Beth Beaney, Lewis 



Newby, Mark Satterfield. 



Creative 
Expression 

From Machines 
To Screens 

Kempsville High School has two up 
and-coming clubs. These clubs are 
the Industrial Arts Club and the Video 
Club. Both of these clubs were formed to 
allow students to creatively express them- 
selves. These clubs also permit the mem- 
bers to use and display their talents. 

This year, the Industrial Arts Club is 
sponsoring two scholarships for a male 
and female involved in Industrial Arts. The 
scholarships are of various amounts and 
will be given to the outstanding Industrial 
Arts achievers. The members of this year's 
Industrial Arts Club will also attend the 
yearly convention held in Richmond. Some 
of the possible plans for the future of the 
Industrial Arts Club involve a possible trip 
to the Epcot Center in Florida and an In- 
dustrial Arts Fair at Kempsville High 
School. The club would like to visit the 
Epcot Center to view the architecture and 
would like to arrange an Industrial Arts 
Fair to involve the Kempsville students in 
Industrial Arts. The officers of the club 
said, "The Industrial Arts Club is for the 
whole school and is not exclusively for the 
drafting and shop students." 

Another of the newest clubs at Kemps- 
ville is the Video Club. The main goals of 
the Video Club are to provide video train- 
ing for students, to provide an opportunity 
for students, to involve students in televi- 
sion production, and to serve the teachers. 
The main purpose of the Video Club is to 
aid the teachers. Members of the club help 
teachers by video taping athletic events 
and classroom productions. The Video 
Club members will be working closely with 
Channel 29, the Public School System 
Channel. Kempsville will have its own pro- 
gram concerning the events that have oc- 
curred at school. This year's officers of the 
Video Club are President Mark Satterfield, 
Vice President Lewis IMewby, Secretary 
Dale Fajardo, and Treasurer Kevin Cahoon. 

These clubs have completed successful 
years and have accomplished many of 
their previously set goals. 



Hobbies/ 157 



Expert Speakers 



KHS Debaters And Speakers Show Off Their Skills 



Debaters and forensic speakers have 
two things in common — the ability 
to speak effectively and to think on the 
spot! 

The forensic team, sponsored by Mrs. 
Depew. participates in the Virginia High 
School League and the Tidewater Forensic 
League, which includes schools from the 
surrounding areas. After attending a num- 
ber of tournaments, they take part in dis- 
trict, regional, and state competitions. 

Foreisics is composed of several cate- 
gories including extemporanious, original 
oratory, prose, and poem reading. A male 
and female member from the team repre- 
sents each category. In the past, the foren 
sics team has performed skillfully, and it 
appears the tradition will continue, as 
Scott Clark said, "The group has exceed- 
ing potential and the future of forensics in 
our school looks bright." 

Although debate is more team oriented 



than forensics, there are many similarities 
between the two. This year, debate adopt- 
ed a new category called Lincoln-Douglas. 
It is an opinionated, rhetoric style of de- 
bate, which gives the speaker more free- 
dom, as in forensics. 

Debate, otherwise known as organized 
argument, is a complex system. According 
to Lara Idsinga, "People often make the 
mistake of believing debate to be merely a 
form of arguing, however, it is much more 
than that. It is a process that requires a 
person to think on their feet, despite the 
pressure. Sallie Hanburry said, "I love de- 
bate because it teaches you to think fast, 
rely on yourself, and fight back." 

Debate consists of three categories: nov- 
ice, varsity, and Linoln-Douglas. "The de- 
bate team performed very well last year," 
Lara Idsinga added, "we have consistently 
placed second this year." 





Forensics Team — First row Michelle Walter. Barry Chovitz. Ms Depew. Jim Mason. Hrod Hello Second ro\ 
David Michael. Debra Wanzong, Brad Lenox. Scott Clark, Tr.ic ey S<oll Bruce Spiv.i 



Cliffton Lee and his partner help bring Kempsvillc to 
second place finish at Cox High School 



158/Organizations 



Mrs Robertson, sponsor, looks on as the debate team 
members Brad Lenox, Michelle Ruben, Mike Rumore, 
and Michelle Walters prepare for another match. 




Jeff Perry presents Ins argument during the debate at 
Cox High School. 









Debate Team — First row: Michelle Walters, Beth Hanbury, Perry Pascual, Brod Bello, Mrs. Robertson 
'-' DeRocher. Tracy Turner, Zabrina Gonzage, Michelle Third row: Bruce Spiva, Chris Dinsmore. Jeff Rouse, 
Ruben. Second row: Eric Stroup. Brad Lenox. Sally Scott Depta. Clifton Lee. Mike Rumore 







-|fq(<x.-^/-«^ <=< 



/^ 



Public Speaking/ 159 



Foreign Flavor At Its Best 



Language Clubs Promote Foreign Cultures 




German Club — Front row Lara Idsigna, Ricky Cock 
ran, Peggie Turner. Michelle Walters. George Phelps. 
Mike Wiersch. Cindy Wiersch Second row: Michelle 
Matuck. Kathy Weese. Diane Fuss. Jackie Bunting, 
Tammy Mattuck. Susan Flagg. Scott Leonard. Mi 
chelle Hilton. Jeff Cohen. Albert Kim Third row: John 



Balmeceda. Win Scott, Maureen Mayer. Jeanne 
Miles. Susie Bruce. Hugh Vidos. William Ward. Susan 
Koerner. Debbie Wonzong. Frau Pindur Fourth row: 
Mike Goodove, Beth Pendelton, Johan Hoeke. David 
Ludena, Lynn Ritker, David Hagar 




French Club — Front row: Mike Adams. JoAnne 
Pontillo. Jennifer Mclntyre. Lisa Spruill. Second row: 
Jeff Salmon, Julie Weinstein, Paula Vaiden, Christi 
Cummings, Julie Comess. Third row Melody Para 



gas. Amy Waranch, Caesar Mamplata, Barn Teach, 
Lisa Spilka Fourth row: Madame Gulick, Richard 
Holcolm, Farah Baig. Sandy Whittaker. Jenny Valade. 
Valerie Myers, Madame Kelly 




This year, as in the past, the foreign 
language clube were formed by stu- 
dents interested in foreign languages and 
countries. Each club planned activities 
which were unique to the country they 
were studying and made them possible by 
fund raising project. 

In order to raise money for their clubs, 
members sold many different items. Each 
club participated in the school-wide candy 
sale. The Latin club sold doughnuts and 
sweat-shirts, and both the Latin and Span- 
ish clubs sold carnations. 

The money earned by the Spanish club 
was used to aid several organizations. It 
donated money to the Joy Fund and to 
Montage. The Spanish club also sponsored 
a needy family at Christmas. Some mem- 
bers of the Spanish club were eligible for 
membership in the Spanish National Honor 
Society, If a student had taken five semes- 
ters of Spanish and maintained a 3.25 aver- 
age, he was a potential member of this 
group of high achievers. 

The French club elaborately celebrated 
the two-hundredth birthday of Montgol- 
fier's invention of the hot air balloon. The 
French club constructed balloon-o-grams 
which were filled with candy and on which 
a person could write a message to a friend. 
In addition to this, the French club had a 
celebration party at which the K-94 hot air 
balloon was the main attraction. 

Each of the foreign language clubs went 
on trips to supplement the study of their 
countries. The Latin club participated in 
the state Latin convention and took a 
group trip to Chrysler Museum, The 
French club went to see a French movie at 
Chrysler Museum, and the Spanish Club 
visited a planetarium and attended the An- 
nual Foreign Language Day at Lynnhaven 
Mall. 

Through the celebration of regional holi- 
days and group trips, the foreign language 
clubs were able to participate in activities 
related to each country's language and cul 
ture. By joining these clubs, students 
learned of the way of life of peoples living 
in other parts of the world. 



Latin Club — Front row: Kenji Toida. Kim Whalin. 
Caryn McBride. Dana McBride. Jeffrey Perry. Fva 
Karin Oberg. Lily Chen. Jene Jaggers, Second row 



Brice Wooldridge. Tony Schwartztrauber. Mr Elias. 
Patrick Lynn. Robert Moore. Susan Slaughter 



160/Organizations 




Spanish Club — Front row Mary Goodwin. Dana 
Welttenhiller, Sharon Goodman, Debbie Lentz. Chuck 
LIsner, Carleton Tignor. Simon Eng, Kathy Barkett, 
Ronald Castaneda Second row: Bonnie Beal, Mary 
ann Baiocco. Rebecca Matney, Stephanie Jacobson, 
Sherry Eluto, Diane McGuire, Marlene Mangosing, 
Lenoa Rondero, Abelardo Layola Third row: Senora 



Petroff, Robin Sanderline. Maria Octavo, Amanda Og 
lesby, Judi Hart, Kathleen Carr, Melissa Gonzaga. 
Tammy Speight, Zabrina Gonzaga, Pam Agbuya, 
Brod Bello, Alan Fontanaires, Senora Doolittle 
Fourth row: Brad INachman. Heather Baker, Pam Mill 
house, Karen Rich, Kristin May, Dale Fajardo, Mike 
Spitalney, Joseph Rivera, Joe McNalty 



The K-94 hot air balloon visited KHS in November to 
celebrate the two hundredth birthday of Montqolfiers 
hot air balloon 

Ufx rv^ oVa JIIVk^ ^rvv. 






Spanish Honor Society — Front row Alan Fontan 
aires, Teresa Pitruny, Deanna Dohmann, Melissa Gon 
zaga, Debbie Lentz, Tammy Speight, Brian Morris, 
Chuck Lisner Second row Victoria Chalfin, Heather 



Baker, Mary Goodwin, Bonnie Beal, Robin Sanderlin, 
Karen Pocock, Eileen Urman, Mike Spitalney, Kristin 
May, Kathy Pocock. Judi Hart, Maria Octavo, Senora 
Doolittle. 



Foreign Language 161 




During the game against Lake Taylor. Geoffe Fouts, 
aided by Matt Thompson, returns a punt down to the 
Spartans ten yard line 

While playing against First Colonial, the Lady Chief's 
Anne Slaughter sets up to hit the ball to a fellow 
teammate. 



r 



^%Mssmsff*!ims^Mmgm 








-W^ 



\h? I Divider 




J Quality 
K 



I 



empsville High School's athletic 
teams have characteristically pos- 
sessed the desire to succeed and the dedi- 
cation required to be the best. Taking more 
pride in their individual skills and talent, 
this year's athletes brought an added di- 
mension to sports at KHS. Regardless of 
final records, the KHS teams continued 
their practice of good sportsmanship and 
maintained high spirits. Furthermore, 
Kempsville athletes were always support- 
ed by fans, coaches, and fellow team- 
mates. According to Varsity Club advisor 
and coach, George Versprille, "The quality 
of Kempsville's athletes could not be 
matched by any other school in the area." 
Attitudes such as this supplied the athletic 
Chief with the motivation to succeed and 
the desire to carry on the tradition of athle- 
tic excellence at Kempsville High School. 




During a match against PA. Art Akers sinks a putt 
or par 



>Vith true determination, Carol Miller runs the three 
■j-nile course at Mount Trashmore 



Si 




Sports' 163 




F;rsf /yow Laura DAnlonio. Sarah Fussell. Courtney Kym Miller. Melissa Grehawick Third Row Steph 
Zierden, Brenda Rabidoux. Doreen Sullivan. Second anie Bannevich. Suzanne Rapravage. Kerry Laughlin. 
Row: Dana Walton, Karen Chasse. Candy Lineberry, Jill Jamison, and Marjbeth Francis. 



164/Sports 



^^ KHS Spirit Sliines Tlirough 




Go Chiefs, Go! 



■uzanne Rapcavage guides the excited fans in a spirit 
d cheer at the football game against Maury 

ho*ing their sportsmanship at every game. Kemps- 
ille's cheerleaders present their best cheer to wel- 
ome the visiting fans. 



any people do not understand 
what it requires to be a cheer 
leader. It is not all glamour and glory. 

First of all, one must be dedicated and 
responsible. Cheerleaders must set an ex- 
ample for the rest of the student body, and 
also represent Kempsville High School, 
even when they are not in school. They 
also must take responsibility for their ac- 
tions. Their dedication is evident since 
they must attend all of the sporting events 
and cheer the different teams to victory. 
Besides just cheering, they make posters 
for all of these events. When they are un- 
able to attend, they bake for the team 
members. Where practice is concerned, 
dedication and responsibility go hand in 



L'-", « 



hand. 



every 
hours 



They have practice once a week, 
Thursday for approximately two 
even during the summer. 

Fifteen girls, out of 64, were selected in 
May, 1983. The girls were: Sophomores 
Stephanie Bannevich, Karen Chasse, and 
Dana Walton, Juniors Laura D'Antonio, 
Sarah Fussell, Melissa Grehawick, Jill Ja- 
mison, Candy Lineberry, and Kym Miller, 
Seniors Maribeth Francis, Kerry Laughlin 
(co-captain), Brenda Rabidoux (co-captain), 
Suzanne Rapcavage, Doreen Sullivan, and 
Courtney Zierden. 

When asked to comment on the 83-84 
squad, sponsor Jane Moran said, "These 
girls have done an excellent job this year!" 



% 







u 



<M 



% 



^.M 



Senior cheerleaders, led by Brenda Rabidoux and Ker 
ry Laughlin, lead the enthusiastic Class of '84 in a 
rowdy senior cheer 



Cheerleading/ 1 65 




Adam Slone smashes an overhead as doubles part- 
ner. Greg Smith, observes. The consistency of this 
number one doubles team enabled them to win their 
crucial match at the State Championship. 

Scrambling is in order for Brad Foster as he maneu- 
vers to hit the ball. 



With a few form adjustments. Howard Swartz 
bends to scoop up the 




Tennis NEl? 



Boys' Tennis Team Wins State Title 



The Kempsville High School 82-83 
Boys' Tennis Team displayed their 
extraordinary talent as they served, 
smashed, and volleyed all the way to the 
state championship. Cinder the guidance of 
Coach Walker, the team proved itself a 
worthy opponent to all challengers. 

Although the boys were known for their 
fun loving personalities, according to 
Coach Walker, when they walked on the 
court, they meant business. Led by num 
ber one seed, Adam Slone, the boys swept 
the district defeating every team 9 0. They, 
then, moved on to regionals downing Po 
quoson in the semifinals and Maury in the 
finals. The KHS team had finally reached 
their goal — the state championship After 
winning the semi finals, they met Robinson 
for the final match. This was somewhat of 



a revenge match for the Chiefs, since Rob- 
inson had cleared Kempsville off of the 
court in forty minutes at the 81-82 cham- 
pionship, and were expecting to do the 
same at the 83 championship. After a 
grueling match, though, KHS proved to be 
the more talented team coming from be- 
hind to secure a 5-4 victory. According to 
Fred Lentz the Chiefs played their best 
tennis ever against Robinson. Major contri- 
butors to the team were Adam Slone, Greg 
Smith, Pete Cook, Brad Foster, John Ellis, 
and Howard Swartz. 

When asked to comment on the 82-83 
season, Coach Walker said, "At the begin- 
ning of the season, the team was com- 
posed of twelve individuals. By the end of 
the season, when we won state, we were 
one team." 



166/Sprlng5 Sports 









^, 




Pete Cook jumps back in order to return a deep shot. 
His agility aided him tremendously throughout the 
season. 






/ 






BOYS' TENNIS 






KHS 


OPP 


F.C. 


9 





Bayside 


9 





Cox 


9 





GR 


9 





Kellam 


9 





PA 


9 





F.C. 


9 





Bayside 


9 





Cox 


9 





GR 


9 





Kellam 


9 





PA 


9 






Boys' Tennis/ 167 



Covering The Bases 



With nine sophomores and only four 
seniors and two juniors the Lady 
Chiefs had an understandably young and 
inexperienced softball team. Unfortunate- 
ly, many close games went into overtime, 
only to be lost by one run. 

During the season the team made a trip 
to York, which was an easy win for Kemps- 
ville. With the help of the two captains, 
Debi Pearson and Susan Pope, the team's 
morale was alwyas high. Even when they 
were not playing, Susan and Debi kept the 
team together, which enabled Susan to win 
most spirited for the second year in a row. 
Debi earned the title most valuable player. 

The Chiefs' endurance was tested by 
playing eleven innings against Princess 
Anne and also by playing nine innings 
against Kellam, only to lose each by one 
run. The Cox game added excitement to 
the season, as the Lady Chiefs' held the 
undefeated team at a tie score until the 
bottom of the last inning, when Cox pulled 
ahead by one run. The girls were more 



Lady Chief's Efforts Take Them Far 



than ready to face Bayside for their last 
game of the year. They defeated Bayside 8- 
5 sending the seniors off with a good fare- 
well and giving the returning players a 
boost for next year. 

Coach Osborne said, "Their biggest 
problem was hitting, but in practice they 
would hit well. Twinkle Blanton was our 
best batter." Twinkle received most im- 
prove dpiayer. 

The senior Lady Chiefs were Debi Pear- 
son, Susan Pope, Twinkle Blanton and Kim 
Parker, while Chris Wunderly and Rani 
Watkins were the returning juniors. The 
newest members of the team were sopho- 
mores Kelly West, Julie Wilson, Dawn 
Dean, Bonnie Lawson, Cheryl Keck, Ginger 
Hayes, Karen Rabidoux, Kelly Wheeler and 
Laurie Fimian, Jo Garrison was the man- 
ager and score keeper. 

Designated captain for next year's team 
Chris Wunderly, comments, "We were a 
really close team. I think we are going to be 
a good team next year." 




1 V^ ' jW 




Coach Osborne claps for her team. Despite her efforts 
the Lady Chiefs lost by a slim margin. 

Susan Pope puts her money where her mouth is as 
she encourages her teammates. 



168/Spring Sports 




'* / ■ •if*',/-. ■ - 



rst Row: Kellie West. Julie Wilson, Karen Rabidoux, 
lurie Fimian, Rani Watkins. Bonnie Lawson. Coach 
sborne Second Row; Dawn Dean, Kelly Wheeler, 



First Colonial stands ready, but to no avail, for Dawn 
Dean slides safely into second base 



Kim Parker puts her best foot forward as she at 
tempts to make a double play from second 



Kellie West cheers on her team to a victory against 
Bayside 



Cheryl Keck, Chris Wunderly, Ginger Hayes Third 
Row: Kim Parker, Susan Pope, Debi Pearson, Twinkle 
Blanton 






Softball 






KHS 


OPP 


Great Bridge 


5 


8 


Cox 


1 


14 


P.A. 


3 


4 


F.C. 


6 


1 


Kellam 


4 


5 


G.R. 


6 


10 


Bayside 


10 


11 


Lake Taylor 





8 


Granby 


11 


1 


Cox 


1 


2 


P.A. 


1 


4 


York 


4 


2 


F.C. 


3 


5 


Kellam 


2 


8 


G.R. 





7 


Bayside 


8 


5 



Softball/ 169 



Chiefs All Pitched In 



Chiefs Slide Into District Title 



In only his second year of coaching 
Kempsville's baseball squad, Coach 
Tim Albert led his talented group to a first 
place finish. This hard-earned district title 
was undecided until the final game of the 
regular season in which Kempsville defeat- 
ed a stubborn Bayside team. 

The Chiefs swung to a superb start win 
ning their first seven league games before 
dropping four in a row. They finished one 
game ahead of arch rivals Green Run and 
Kellam. Warwick halted the red-hot Chiefs 
in a regional playoff game. Kempsville re- 
mained close most of the game getting 
clutch hits from outfielders Geoff Fout, 
Mac McGarity, and Matt Leeds, infielders 
D.J. Dozier, Mike Morris, Scott Whittier, 
and Chris Francis, Catcher Matt Hudgins, 
and designated hitter C.A. Dankmyer. Fine 



pitching from Jeff Brown and reliever Rod 
Wilson also aided in the game against War- 
wick. 

Led by tri-captains D.J. Dozier, Matt 
Hudgins, and Mac McGarity, the squad en- 
deavored to promote team spirit and unity. 
This positive attitude and much dedication 
put Kempsville in first place in yet another 
team sport. Matt Leeds added, "We really 
worked hard as a team and helping each 
other out to become a good team." 

Tracey Joe, a member of the squad, 
stated, "There is a lot of material returning 
and I don't see any reason why we 
shouldn't be even a better team next 
year." Team spirit, dedication, and pride 
have enabled the Chiefs to remain on top 
of the baseball scene. 



»>"• 



r* 



f 



> 



•^ 









si^ " 









A 



Although D.J. Dozier is widely recognized for his foot 
ball abilities, he is extremely capable in the area of 
baseball, as seen here in the game against Green Run 



170/ Spring Sports 



With intentions of defeating Green Run, Mac McGar- 
ity hits a double which brought in a run. 



Jeff Brown warnris up in between innings hoping to 
lead the Chiefs to another victory 










BASEBALL 






KHS 


OPP 


Lake Taylor 


10 


3 


Douglas Freeman 


2 


1 


Western Branch 


12 


11 


Cox 


6 


2 


Princess Anne 


8 


6 


First Colonial 


10 


5 


Kellam 


6 


5 


Green Run 


4 


2 


Bayside 


15 


5 


Cox 


5 


4 


Princess Anne 


1 


7 


York 


9 


8 


Richmond 


11 


7 


First Colonial 





1 


Kellam 


11 


16 


Green Run 


6 


8 


Bayside 


2 


1 



First row: Matt Leeds, Tommy Hunter, Geoff Fout. 
Jason Beaton, C A Dankmyer, Second Row: Mike 
Morris, Tracey Joe, Charlie Hodges. Scott Hoffman. 
Rod Wilson. Robbie Larmore, Pete Catalano, Third 



Row: Joe Tinkler. Mac McGarity. Gill Benham, D.J. 
Dozier, Robbie Engle. Jeff Brown, Charles Lassen. 
Matt Hudgins, Scott Whittier, and Coach Tim Albert. 



Baseball/ 171 



Fancy Footwork I 



Lady Chiefs Claim District Title ~Z 



As the season came to an end. the 
Lady Chiefs captured the district ti- 
tle for girls soccer. They were co-champi- 
ons, sharing their well-earned title with the 
Cox Falcons. Unfortunately a playoff 
game was not permitted due to school rul- 
ings. 

The girls' soccer team started training 
for the season by running two miles three 
to four times a week. Captain Beth Carpen- 
ter stated, "Hard, intense practices helped 
pull our team to the top." The Lady Chiefs 
entered the season with a positive attitude 
because of their high ratings with the offi- 
cials and a new assistant coach, Mary Ko- 
mornick, a former player at KHS. 

Throughout the season goal-scoring per- 
sistence was provided by forwards Susie 
Walton, Karen Colucci, Jennifer Scott, and 
Paige Kelly, while halfback Maureen Bas- 
teck always fired a shot when necessary. 
The Lady Chiefs center of power revolved 
around center halfback Denise Sokolinsky 



whose outstanding skills were a definite 
asset to the team. 

The Kempsville Chiefs showed a tremen- 
dous amount of skill and agressiveness 
this year. Their outstanding achievements 
were rewarded by placing the largest num- 
ber of players in the 1983 all-Beach District 
girls soccer team. Three of them, Susie 
Walton, Maureen Basteck, and Denise So- 
kolinsky, were placed on the first team, 
while Karen Colucci, Maureen Thompson, 
Sandy Cohen, and Sandra Dohmann were 
on the second team. Barbara Koeppen also 
received an honorable mention. Coach 
Frank McGrath stated about his team, 
"The potential we had two years ago ma- 
tured last season with our championship 
performance, and I expect it to reach full 
bloom this year, because for the first time 
girls' soccer will have a state tournament. 
It should be no problem for next year's 
team to make it to the finals." 




Front row: Maureen Thompson, Colleen McFeely, ager Lisa Popperwill, Sandy Cohen. /Maureen Bas 

Sandra Dohmann, Paige Kelly, Sarala Katepalli. Susie teck, Cheryl Paris, Carrie West. Karen Colucci. Jenni 

Walton. Beth Carpenter. Janet Martin, fer Scott, Mary Connerton. Kathleen Moore, Manager 

Back row: Assistant coach Mary Komornick. man Marykay McFeely. coach Frank McGrath. 



Susie Walton uses her aggressiveness to get control 
of the ball before turning and shooting on goal. 




Sti 



I % 








172/Spring Sports 




Barbara Koeppen rushes the opposing team while 
Paige Kelly makes a run to help out 



Using her skill, Denise Sockolinsky dribbles the ball 
down the field, preparing to execute a pass. 






Girls' Soccer 






KHS 


OPP 


Cox 





2 


PA 


4 


I 


FC 


1 


2 


Kellam 


4 





GR 


4 


1 


Bayside 


2 





Cox 


3 


1 


PA 


1 


9 


FC 


4 





Kellam 


4 


2 


GR 


5 


1 


Bayside 


2 


1 



oach Frank McGrath and assistant coach Mary Ko- 
lornick intensly evaluate the performance of their 
layers on the field in the game against Cox. 



Girls' Soccer/ 173 




Coach Chappell. Raymond Stone. Scott Bondurant, and 
Panikos Kyriakades observe as Kennpsville demolishes 
yet another opponent 



Mark Sokohnsky uses his head when on the soccer fieic 



1 74/ Spring Sports 




Chiefs Kick Gp A Storm 



Boys' Soccer Team Has A Successful 
Season Despite Many Changes 



>% 

V 






: Blair Ferguson exhibits'Tiis' soccer skills as he 
I outmaneuvers an opponent from FC. 



Dr. Earl Chappell's first year coach- 
ing at Kempsville was a season for 
change for the 1983 boys' soccer team. 

Although it often takes time for a team 
to flourish under new coaching, the 1983 
team proved that they could master new 
techniques and still play excellent soccer. 
They finished with the district record 8-4 
and an overall record of 10-4. Dr. Chappell 
expressed his view of the 1983 boys' soc- 
cer team in these words; "Considering the 
team's youth, they played exceptionally 
well. Next year we will have some rough 
spots to work out, but overall we should be 
a tough team to beat." 

Co-captain Bill Koeppen says, "Al- 
though we were unlucky at putting the ball 
in the net sometimes, we still played the 




most attractive soccer in the district." Bill 
also believes that Kempsville played the 
same level of soccer as district champion. 
Green Run, and attributes the close losses 
to Green Run, First Colonial, and Bayside 
to the last minute penalty kicks by the 
opposing teams. 

More than one-third of the team was rec- 
ognized by the city of Virginia Beach as 
outstanding players, with Scott Bondurant 
placing All-Beach first team. 

Panikos Kyriakides predicts, "Next sea- 
son should be even more successful with 
talented players such as Sam Bondurant, 
Eric Schor, Scott Leonard, Scott Collins, 
Brian Vaughn, Brian Sherwood, Raymond 
Stone, Jud Rhode, and Mark Sokolinsky 
returning to Kempsville." 





Boys' Soccer 






KHS 


OPP 


Cox 


4 


3 


PA 


4 





FC 





1 


Kellam 


2 





GR 


1 


2 


Bayside 


3 





W. Branch 


4 





Cox 


2 


1 


PA 


3 





FC 


3 


2 


Kellam 


3 


4 


GR 


2 


1 


Bayside 


1 


2 



Front Row: Mark Sokolinsky, Chris Gladden, Scott 
Leonard, Brian Vaughn, Sam Bondurant. Panikos Kyr 
iakides Middle Row: Eric Schorr, Eric Brown, John 
DeMartino, Blair Ferguson. Bill Koeppen, Scott Bon 



durant Back Row: Coach Chappell, Bob Basteck, 
David Brun. Raymond Stone, Brian Sherwood, Jud 
Rhode, Scott Collins, Steve Pierson. 




Boys' Soccer/ 175 



Brian Millikin's impeccable form in the high jump 
propels him to victory at the meet against Bayside 





Row I — Mike Fonville, Rob McAndrews, Scott tr.i 
choltz. Sean Marsh, Ku Chung, Ian Ryan, John Grady 
Row 2 — Carl Roystrie. Daryl Rome, John Miles, Lee 
Wells, Scott Depta, Joe Smith, Chance Schober. 
Chris Barton, Andrew Koenig, Carlos George, Mike 
Wiersch, Alonzo Coston Row 3 — Marvin Strickland. 
Mike Holloway, John McLaughlin, Robert White, Joe 



Brewer, Uarnay Banal. David Beshires, Mark Jury, 
Greg Remy, Clay Retry, Tommy Brown Row 4 — 
Ronald Swartsentruber, Allen Smith, Tommy Kau 
pas, Charles Williams, Brian Millikin, Tim Freeman, 
Jim Miller, Bobby Armour, D J Dozier, T J Morgan, 
Lawrence LAnson. Chris McLaughlin 




Row I — Beth DeRocher, Chen Baily, Tern Drake, 
Maria Octavo, Chris Arzadon, Ashley Dunn, Linda 
Gladstone, Beth Pendleton Row 2 — Peyton Hull, 
Kathy Meehan, Mary Scaglione, Tiffany Primm, Nan 
cy Vanderweleon, Susannah Baxter, Crystal Harris. 



Lofi Brandon Row 3 Kim Nelson, Jenny Waltz. 
Caryn Nowland. T J Whitehurst. Tory Ehle. Kelly 
Nelson. Reina George, Dawn Madison. Debbie Ashley, 
Michelle Morris. 




176/Spring Sports 




Off And Running 



Chiefs Sprint Through Districts 



As spring approached, the athletes of 
the 82-83 KHS track team set their 
sights on the demanding race ahead of 
them — the race toward a victorious track 
season. Conditioned by preseason training, 
which according to T.J. Whitehurst was 
much more vigorous than the later prac- 
tices, the athletes anticipated the official 
starting block. Cinder the supervision of 
coaches Vesprille, Piccillo, and Nicklas, 
the track team trained for specific events 
ranging from sprinting and long distance 
running, to the high jump and javelin. After 
choosing an event, each athlete planned 
his strategy for the upcoming season. 

When the first starting gun sounded in 
early April, the team was off and running. 
Surpassing each of its competitors, the 
team gained speed. As the regular season 
neared its end, the team put forth a con- 




centrated effort to win districts in order to 
qualify for regionals. "This is by far the 
best team we've ever had," proudly stated 
Ms. Nicklas, coach of the girls' team. The 
hours of grueling practice paid off as the 
boys' and girls' teams defeated Norview, 
Cox, Bayside, and Kellam. Finally, the end 
of the season was in view, and the team 
sprinted with a final burst of energy to- 
wards the finish line. Leading the way for 
the girls' team were Kelly Nelson, Crystal 
Harris, T.J. Whitehurst, and Tory Ehle, 
while the boys were headed by Chris Bar- 
ton, T.J. Morgan, Mike Fonville, and Mike 
Holloway. Brian Millikan summed up his 
view of the season with the words, "We 
had a very successful season last year, and 
I am looking forward to an even better one 
next year." 



BOYS' 


TRACK 






KHS 


OPP 


Norview 


82 


45 


Cox 


115 


21 


First Colonial 


34 


102 


Bayside 


80 


56 


Kellam 


94 


42 


Princess Anne 


59 


76 


Green Run 


79 


56 


GIRLS 


TRACK 




Norview 


KHS 
73 


OPP 
39 


Cox 

First Colonial 

Bayside 

Kellam 

Princess Anne 


72 
65 
74 
112 
65 


42 
49 
40 
2 
49 


Green Run 


57 


57 



Long distance runner. Carlos George, leads the boys 
to an impressive victory over Green Run. Carlos' 
consistency in this event considerably aided the 
Chiefs. 



A mark of determination crosses Kim Nelson's face 
as she strives to finish the last half mile. 



Track/ 177 



Up To Par 



The KHS Golf Team 
Swings To Success 

The Kempsville golf team practiced 
long and hard over the summer in 
order to prepare for the new fall season. 
This was quite unusual for the Chiefs; in 
the past, golf season was held in the 
spring, but this year it was changed to a 
fall sport. During the summer, the mem- 
bers of the golf team spent most of their 
time playing in tournaments, gaining valu- 
able experience for the upcoming season. 

The spring team of 1983 was led by 
Ricky Christian with an average of 76. The 
Chiefs won the regular season title, the 
Beach District Tournament, the Regional 
Tournament, and placed fourth in the 
statewide tournament. According to Coach 
Braun, "This was probably one of the best 
teams that 1 have had at Kempsville." Oth- 
er members of the team were Brett West, 
Steve Mote, Jim O'Neil, Doug Morris, Russ 
Dodson, Tom Haymes, and Kasey Camp- 
bell. 

Under the leadership of Bob Braun, the 
fall team of 1983 was undefeated in regular 
season matches. The Chiefs went on to 
place second in the regional tournament. 
This finish enabled the team to move on to 
the state tournament, which was held at 
Hell's Point Golf Course. Led by Brett 
West, who shot two consecutive 78's, the 
team finished fifth. The fall team of 1983 
contained many of the same members as 
the spring team. Brett West, Russ Dodson, 
and Tom Haymes were members of both 
teams. Frank Sink, Jeff Weeks, Art Akers, 
David Lutz, and Sean O'Neil were the new 
members of the fall team. 

The KHS golf team went through many 
changes this year. The golf season was 
changed from the spring to the fall and 
there were many new members who did 
not have much experience. Despite these 
changes, the 1983 spring and fall teams 
held up the tradition of fine golf teams at 
Kempsville. 





Front Row Tom Haymes, Russ Dtxison. Doug Morns, 
Kdsey Campbell. Brelt West Back Row: Ricky Chris 



tian, Steve Mote, Jim O THeii 



178/Sports 



i 



'Despite being in the woods. Frank Sink follows 
j through in perfect form. 



;Brett West and Russ Dodson study the green before ^^ith great concentration, Russ Dodson lines up his 
Imaking their final putt putt for birdie. 




In hopes of getting the ball close to the pin, Jeff 
Weeks chips on to the green. 




SPRING 


•83 GOLF 






KHS 


OPP 


Bayside 


315 


384 


GR 


295 


333 


Cox 


303 


344 


Kellam 


295 


351 


FC 


297 


327 


PA 


299 


332 



Jeff Weeks, Tonn Haymes, David Lutz. Brett West. Dodson. Art Akers 
Coach Bob Braun, Frank Sink, Curtis Skolnick. Russ 



FALL -83 GOLF 




KHS 


OPP 


Bayside 338 


390 


GR 161 


174 


Cox 323 


348 


Kellam 325 


342 


FC 323 


341 


PA 318 


321 



Golf/ 179 



The Matchmakers 



Girls' Tennis Team Matches The Competition 



Debbie Lentz hits a backhand passing shot down the 
line to defeat her Princess Anne opfxsnent. 



While the typical Kempsville stu 
dent sunned hinnself under the 
blistering August rays, the nnembers of the 
Kempsville High School Girls' Tennis 
Team began to prepare for a long, chal- 
lenging season. From August 8th to Octo- 
ber 20th, the Lady Chiefs worked hard to 
improve their team. 

From the very beginning, Coach Cheryl 
Walker engaged the team in strenuous 
practice sessions. The girls ran laps, sprint- 
ed up and down bleachers, and suffered 
through numerous drills. Even when it 
rained, the KHS Girls' Tennis Team contin- 
ued practice indoors, sprinting the 700 hall 
stairs or working out on the ball machine in 
the KHS gym. The team's efforts did not 
go unrewarded; the benefits were apparent 
in many successful matches against dis- 



trict opponents. 

The girls' first priority, working together 
as a team, was evident in their improved 8- 
4 district record. The team placed third in 
the district with losses only to second 
place Cox and state champions First Colo- 
nial. Captain Tammy Ponder comments, 
"Though we did not have an undefeated 
season, I feel that we had a good season, 
and the team worked well together. " 

Overall, the KHS Girls' Tennis Team 
was successful. Each player's effort to pro- 
mote team unity helped the team secure a 
winning record. Coach Walker sums up her 
views of the team's final outcome by say- 
ing, "Even though we placed third again 
this season, 1 felt that individual improve- 
ments benefited the team and made it a 
fun and exciting season." 






With astounding agrlity. Kristin May lunges to return 
a strong serve Along with agility, Kristin had 

strong endurance which helped her to win this close 
three set match against a First Colonial opponent 



Joan Schell, the number four singles player, displays 
her powerful forehand which often took her oppo- 
nents by surprise Emily Bordy. an undefeated player 
in the number three doubles team, admires Joans 
shot 



n 



1 80/ Fall Sports 




ront Row: Melissa Houser. Jenny Kahara, Susan 
laughter. Terri Meehan, Debbie Lentz, Kelley Walk- 
r, Beth Gross. 



Back Row: Tina Wendt, Emily Bordy, Tammy Pon- 
der. Joan Schell, Kristin May, Suzy Kirk, Virginia 
Scott, Cindy Wiersch. 



After smashing a blistering serve, Tammy Ponder 
rushes to the net in order to close out the point. This 
aggressive style of play led Tammy to an overall 
record of 10-2 in singles 



The number two player, Beth Gross, steps forward to 
hit a forceful backhand. Beth's backhand was a con- 
tributing factor to her many wins in both singles and 
doubles. 




Girls' 


Tennis 






KHS 


OPP 


Kellam 


9 





P.A. 


8 


1 


G.R. 


9 





Bayside 


7 


2 


F.C. 


1 


8 


Cox 


4 


5 


Kellam 


9 





P.A. 


9 





G.R. 


9 





Bayside 


8 


1 


F.C. 


3 


6 


Cox 


4 


5 



Girls' Tennis/ 1 



David Ryan displays his winning stride that earned 
him a second place finish in the Eastern Region meet 
as well as an outstanding fourth place finish in the 
State meet. 



Sprinting To The Finish 



Boys' And Girls' Cross Country 
Teams Dominate The Eastern Region 



Hard work and perseverance were 
the two contributing factors to the 
1983-84 boys' and girls' cross country 
teams' numerous victories. From mid-Au- 
gust until mid-November the teams con- 
tinuously practiced. In addition to a two 
and a half hour practice after school, each 
member ran three miles before school. The 
practices consisted of either running the 
track, sprinting up and down the hills of 
Mount Trashmore, or lifting weights in the 
KHS weight room. 

The teams' numerous practices did reap 
many rewards, though. For, they once 
again proved their excellence by dominat- 
ing the Eastern Region. The girls' team 
won their fifth Eastern Region meet, while 
the boys' team secured their fourth con- 
secutive title. 

This year the girls' team was led by Pey- 
ton Hull, who finished third in the region- 




als, and Reina George. David Ryan and 
Carlos George, the top runners for the 
boys' team, placed second and fourth, re- 
spectively, in the Eastern Region meet. Da- 
vid Ryan cites the reasons behind the 
team's success, "I believe we were so suc- 
cessful this year because we had an out- 
standing coach. Also, everyone worked 
very hard." Coach Piccillo agrees that the 
teams worked hard because he summa- 
rizes his overall view of the 1983-84 season 
as, "We were very pleased with the results 
of our cross country teams this year. The 
hard work and personal sacrifices by the 
girls and boys enabled them to remain un- 
defeated, as well as repeat as District and 
Regional champions. Of most importance 
was the fact that the teams consistently 
worked for both personal and team im- 
provement throughout the season. This 
was the key to our continued success." 



Front row Robin Koch Christina DeJesus, Reina Back row: Cherri Bailey. Paige Kelly. Beth DeRocher. 
George. Peyton Hull, Carole Miller Sheila Rivette 



Christina DeJesus and Sheila Rivette comfort each 
other after a grueling race. 



1 82/ Fall Sports 



iempsville runners lean forward in anticipation of the 
tarting gun In tfiis nneet against the Cox Falcons 
■oth the girls' and boys' teams were victorious by a 
srge margin. 




BOYS' 


CROSS COUNTRY 




KHS 


OPP 


G.R. 


22 


35 


Cox 


18 


44 


F.C. 


16 


43 


Bayside 


15 


47 


Kellam 


20 


37 


P.A. 


16 


45 



Front row: Kevin Hudson, Martin George, Richard 
Clark, Rob McAndrews, David Ryan, Bobby Clarke, 
Chris Haas 



Back row: Mike Wiersch, Lawrence I'Anson, Carlos 
George, Greg Remy, Henry Pogorzelski, Scott Mills, 
Donnie French 



GIRLS' 


CROSS COGNTRY 




KHS OPP 


G.R. 


20 36 


Cox 


23 34 


Bayside 


21 34 



Cross Country/ 183 



Flick Of The Stick *" 



Lady Chiefs **Drive" To Victory! 



While most students were trying to 
catch the last rays of summer, the 
'83 -'84 field hockey team was hard at 
work. Miss Nickolas began team practices 
in mid-August in order to prepare for a 
successful season. 

Led by captain Susie Walton, this year's 
team was the team to beat. The offense 
was excellent and had two outstanding 
starters, T.J. Whitehurst and Susie Wal- 
ton. The defense did a first-rate job protect- 
ing the Chief's goal cage. Four players who 
excelled in defensive skills were seniors 
Tiffany Primm, Theresa Labyak, Janet 
Martin, and Maureen Bastek. 



The eight sophomores, five juniors, and 
eight seniors formed a strong bond of 
friendship through the long hours of prac- 
tice. Spirit and devotion kept the girls go- 
ing when the sprints seemed to last forever 
and the hocks seemed to get longer. Coach 
Nickolas commented, "This year's team 
was special because the girls were so dedi- 
cated; they spent every Saturday practic- 
ing and did all that was asked of them." 

The girls' hard work paid off when the 
Lady Chiefs came in second in district. The 
girls had a fantastic season, and can be 
proud of their 10-2 record. 




■^^«**^. 



■^«ii£l:»&ik:L-di 




Anne Slaughter, the only sophomore to start, proves The experience Maureen Bastek has as a goalie con- 
to a First Colonial player that she is an obstacle which tributes to the fact that she rarely allows an opponent 
cannot be avoided. to score on the Chief's goal. 



184/Fall Sports 



Coach Nickolas remains at ease, while she supervises 
the team as they do a warm-up practice before the 
home game against Kellam. 




4 

\ 

4 



Field 


Hockey 






KHS 


OPP 


Cox 





1 


Princess Anne 


7 





Kellam 


2 





Green Run 


2 





Bayside 


5 


1 


First Colonial 


1 





Cox 


2 


3 


Princess Anne 


3 





Kellam 


1 





Green Run 


3 





Bayside 


1 





First Colonial 


4 


9 



First Row: Anne Slaughter, Andrea Watson, Laura Chris Arzadon. Third Row: Susie Walton, Maureen 

McLaughlin, Wendy McVey, Kathleen McCabe, Laura Bastek, Mary Scaglioni, Tiffany Primm, Janet Martin, 

Lee, Karen McCabe. Second Row: Liz Annet, Sheryl Sandy Cohen, Theresa Labyak, Nancy Van Den 

Keck, Susannah Baxter, Kelly West, T.J. Whitehurst, Ouweelen. 



Field Hockey/ 185 




During the game against Lake Taylor. Coach Gaha 
gan uses a timeout to "inspire" his players to perform 
correctly. 



The strength of the Chief's offensive line blows Cox's 
Falcons off the line of scrimmage to create a hole for 
quarterback Gil Benham to run through. 



rC 



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Team Standouts 



All Stars Exhibit True "Chief" Spirit 



Although the outstanding '83-84 foot- 
ball season can be attributed to the 
team as a whole, the team consisted of 
many talented players who contributed 
heavily to its success. T.J. Morgan, Gil 
Benham, and Joe Briggs are among the 
many players who exhibited a tremendous 
amount of endurance and morale. Further- 
more, Kempsville players were elected to 
the All Beach Team, All State Team, and 
even the All American Team. Kempsville 
placed eleven players on the All Beach 
team including Merlin Swartzentruber, 
Mike O'Hara, Rob Hicks, T.J. Morgan, and 
Scott Whittier on offense, and Tim Free- 
man, Rob Davis, Warren Christie, Donald 
Rhodes, and Joe Tinkler on defense. Bruce 
Cinibulk, the punter, was also elected to 
the All Beach Team. T.J. Morgan, Mike 
O'Hara, and Merlin Swartzentruber were 
members of the All State Team, while Mer- 
lin Swartzentruber was named to the All 




In order to beat Lake Taylor, Kempsville's defensive 
attack had to shut down Lake Taylor's offense by 
allowing few yards rushing as well as passing. 



Aided by coach George Versprille, Kempsville's of 
fense gives its defense the needed support to become 
number one in the area. 



A battered T.J. Morgan lets Coach Gahagan know 
what it is really going on out on the field. 



American Team. 

Many players displayed individual tal- 
ents. T.J. Morgan, named Tidewater Play- 
er of the Year, was dependable and durable 
consistently picking up the needed yard- 
age. Merlin Swartzentruber, Donald 
Rhodes, Tim Freeman, and Ronnie Con- 
yers were all noted for their size, as they 
exerted brute strength against the opposi- 
tion. Joe Tinkler, C.A. Dankmeyer, and 
Mike Morris all displayed speed at their 
defensive back positions. Joe Tinkler also 
successfully blocked many extra point and 
field goal attempts while Mike Morris ex- 
hibited skill as he returned punts. Prepared 
for the occasional passes, leading receivers 
Joe Briggs and Scott Whittier aided the 
Chiefs' air attack. 

The KHS '83-84 football squad consisted 
of many multi-talented individuals who 
served to unite the team and contributed to 
its effectiveness. 




Football/ 187 



y 



All Together Now 



• • 



Team Work Proves To Be The Deciding Factor 



The '83-84 Kempsville High School 
football team proved to be extremely 
productive, skillful, and competent as they 
attained the best record in Kempsville's 
history. Their 131 recorded included not 
only district victories, but regional win- 
nings as well. 

Fortunately the team members were be- 
set with few injuries this year which en- 
abled them to perform to the best of their 
abilities. To maintin fitness and muscle 
tone, the team began a weight lifting pro- 
gram after Thanksgiving (1982) and contin- 
ued training throughout the year. The rig- 
orous training of the regular season began 
on August 10 and ended in early De- 
cember. The hard work and training were 
well worth the effort, for not only did it 
improve the squad's strength and ability, it 
emphasized the team's remarkable size. 
Throughout the season, it was continually 
noted that Kempsville's front lines 
outweighed those of all other teams 
played. 

The accomplishments of the "teams" 
within the team should not be forgotten. 
Kempsville's defense was ranked number 
one in the area and permitted other teams 
to score only a minimum number of points 
against them. In addition, both the offense 
and defense continually aided each other. 



If the offense was not executing the plays 
effectively, as in the Lake Taylor game, the 
defense would tighten up and get that valu- 
able turnover. Likewise, in the play-off 
game against Great Bridge, one might re- 
call that the defense allowed the opposi- 
tion to put too many points on the board. 
The offense came back to score leaving 
only seven seconds in the game. 

The team's success could not have been 
possible without the guidance and knowl- 
edge of coaches Ralph Gahagan (offensive 
backs), George Versprille (defensive line), 
Tim Albert (defensive backs), Jim Ritter 
(offensive line), and trainer Mike McGee. 
Special thanks should also be given to 
team doctor Mr. Morrow. 

The team accomplished much, downing 
every team in the district, including rivals 
FC and Green Run, and capturing the Dis- 
trict title. To further capitalize their win- 
nings, the Chiefs defeated Lake Taylor and 
Great Bridge to earn the title of Eastern 
Regional Champions. Although the team 
did receive a final disappointment at the 
State Championship, its previous triumphs 
should not be belittled. The Chiefs covered 
a tremendous distance for a team who had 
never won a play-off game in the school's 
history. 




.t 



^ :f-^ 



The "T.J. Express" always seemed to find the right 
hole to pick up those needed yards. 



Aided by holder Gil Benham. Mike Morris kicks the 
winning extra point to beat Lake Taylor. 




1 88/ Fall Sports 




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Front Row — Brandon Hamilton. Mac Church. Jack 
Freeman, Robert Reece. Mike Morris. Donald Rhodes, 
T J Morgan. Matt Leeds. Joe Tinkler. Warren Chris 
tie. Pete DeAngelo 

2nd Row — Robert Holt, Joe Banister, Mike Armour, 
Shane Arnold, Matt Ford, Mark DeJesus, Randell Wil 
lard, Kevin Mack, Geoff Fout, Rich Cunningham, C A. 
Dankmeyer, Dan Guinn. Kirk Falk, Bill Storm. Thom 
as More, Troy Ramsey 




«=3Qj^^KV}€r 



The huge Kempsville offense readies' for EatUe ~^Q4■^**^ 
against Lake Taylor, / ., ^ _^ 



3rd Row — Tom Colucci, Mike Lavender, Kip Harber- 
son, Tim Worst, Bill Becker, Joe Brewer, Rob Davis, 
Robbie Larmore, Peter Catalano, Chris Francis, Rob 
Hicks Mike OHara, Matt Thompson, Steve Peters. 
David Brown 

Back Row — Merlin Swartzentruber, Ronnie Conyers, 
Tim Freeman, Nathan Austin, Jay DeJesus, John 
Wood, Joe Briggs, Bobby Wilson, Scott Whittier, 
Bruce Cinibulk, Scott Johnson, Grant Mott. 



FOOTBALL 






KHS 


OPP 


Bayside 
Lake Taylor 
Dinwiddle 


33 

7 
17 


13 
6 



Kellam 


24 





F.C. 


10 


7 


Maury 
Cox 


27 
37 


16 
6 


P.A. 


49 


14 


G.R. 


23 


6 


Morview 


34 


7 


Lake Taylor* 
Great Bridge* 
Hopewell* 
Mount Vernon* 


27 

27 

13 




10 

21 

6 

10 


* indicates post 


season games 





Football/ 189 



Perfect Tens 



Finishing with a perfect record, the 
1984 gymnastics team had a very 
successful season. They captured both the 
district and regional titles. The Lady Chiefs 
were under the guidance of Mrs. Karcher, a 
first year coach, and Charlene Harrell. 

As Sarah Fussell said, "The team was 
strong, we had good depth." Led by the 
talents of senior Becky Mohap and sopho- 
more Dana Walton along with the juniors 
Sarah Fussell and Tina Luzzi, the Chiefs 
were unbeatable. The Chiefs' talent did not 
stop there. Other members were seniors 
Carrie West, Suzanne Rapcavage, Kathy 
Pocock and Karen Pocock, with sopho- 
mores Megan Bickerstaff, Karen Chaves, 
and Lauren Booth. 

The Lady Chiefs also participated in 
state competition, fairing well. Mrs. 
Karcher said, "We had a good group of 
girls who had fun, but at the same time 
accomplished what they needed to." 

Although the team experienced some 
problems, they always pulled together. 
The team had a few close matches, but 
came through it all. Congratulations girls 
on taking the District and Regional titles. 



Gymnastics Team Proves Best In The Region 




Back row: Karen Chaves, Kathy Pocock, Dana Wdl I tiuren Booth. Karen Pocock, Sarah Fussell, Tin<i Sarah Fussell breaks the tension of the meet against 
ton, Suzanne Rapcavage, Becky Mohap Front row Luzzi. Megan Bukerstaff, Carrie West Green Run, by playmo with Mr I owranres rlaughler 



Becky Mohap completes her back flip on beam to 
finish a successful routine. 



190/Winter Sports 




Megan Bickerstaff does a front aerial nnounf on beam. 




Coach Karcher looks on. during a close match against 
Green Run Fortunately. Kempsville came on top. 



Preparing to do another front walkover, Tina Luzzi 
has a look of concentration. 





Gymnastics 




KHS 


F.C. 


Kellam 


91.10 


86.15 


72.15 


KHS 


P.A. 


Cox 


94.15 


62.85 


91.15 


KHS 


Kellam 




94.75 


76.65 




KHS 


G.R. 




98.75 


95.80 




KHS 


F.C. 


Bayside 


99.30 


88.40 


81.80 


KHS 


P.A. 


Cox 


102.55 


68.60 


98.3 


KHS 


Kellam 




101.50 


87.05 




KHS 


G.R. 




100.25 


98.30 





..■.^■ iliiitliilii MMr- 



Gymnastics/ 191 



A Court 
Appointment 



Boys' Basketball Retains 
Beach District Title 

The 1983-84 Basketball season proved 
to be successful for the Kempsville 
Chiefs. The team's accomplishments in- 
clude acquiring another Beach title, receiv- 
ing a top ten ranking in the state poll, and 
obtaining a number three ranking in the 
Tidewater poll. 

The team members began improving 
their physique in October by running laps 
around the track and lifting weights. Dur- 
ing the season, they continued their train- 
ing with daily practices. Their efforts have 
certainly paid off, for Coach Dick Ponti 
labels them as "Kempsville's best offen- 
sive team ever." In the past, the Chiefs 
often were provided with a stronger de- 
fense, but this year's talented outside 
shooters have balanced the team nicely. 
This surprising offensive skill has supplied 
the opposition with much trouble as was 
evident in the games against Bayside (79- 
55) and F.C. (61-39). 

Contributors to this year's team include 
Brian Koehr, Greg Kolcum, and David Hil- 
ton, who exhibited their talent with scoring 
and rebounding abilities. Point guard. Tom- 
my Brown, ran the offense while maintain- 
ing order. J.R. Reid, the best player in the 
area, exhibited his skills by averaging 
twenty-one points and fourteen rebounds a 
game. Gil Benham and Juan Mungo 
fruther contributed to the team's success. 
The team as a whole, however, deserves 
the final credit for the outstanding season. 




Point guard. Tommy Brown, directs teammates as 
J R Reid struggles to get position 



With outstretched arms, both Greg Kolcum and his 
opponent battle for the rebound. 



Players look on intently, as Coach Ponti reveals his 
strategy. 



192/Wlnter Sports 




Gil Benham attempts to make a clean block in the 
game against Granby. 



JR. Reid displays the form which earned him the 
Beach district scoring title. 



i 




Front Row; Jeff Sprague. Mark Phelps, Jack Free my Kaupus, Nicky Bryant, David Hilton. JR. Reid, 
man, Dan Rhodes, Tommy Brown. Carl Royster. Juan Brian Koehr. Robbie Engle. Greg Kolcum, Gil Ben- 
Mungo. Darrell Williams Back Row Tim Worst. Tom- ham. 



Boys' 


Basketball 






KHS 


OPP 


P.A. 


46 


40 


Green Run 


43 


24 


Kellam 


67 


43 


Bayside 


60 


52 


F.C. 


61 


39 


Cox 


71 


47 


Kellam 


53 


35 


F.C. 


68 


62 


Cox 


57 


35 


Bayside 


79 


55 


Green Run 


38 


36 



Boys' Basketball/ 193 



Shoot For Two! 



Girls' Basketball Team Steals District Title 



This year the Girls' Basketball Team 
overcame one major hurdle. Last 
year all five starters graduated, leaving 
Coach Nicklas with five inexperienced 
starters. None of this year's starters had 
ever started before. The team seemed to 
overcome this inexperience very well. The 
three senior captains, Alexis Dobler, 
Tammy Ponder, and Susie Walton have 
contributed considerably by exhibiting 
their leadership abilities. 

Coach Nicklas feels that, "The team is 
very well balanced." Taking the district 
title with a record of 15-3, Coach Nicklas 
said, "This is the best team Kempsville has 
ever had." 

This year the girls have been successful 
in defeating their major rival, Cox, twice 
during the season. The Lady Chiefs defeat- 
ed most opponents by a large margin, aver- 
aging a twenty point spread. 

Junior starter T.J. Whitehurst added, 
"The outlook for next year is good with 
two returning starters, Susannah Baxter 
and myself." They also have promising 
talents in the rising juniors. 

The Girls' Basketball Team has truly 
come of age. Congratulations girls on a 
fantastic season. 




First row — Tern Drake. Susie Walton. T J White 
hurst. Kathleen McCabe; Second row — Coach Judy 
PHicklas, Kris Schneider, Laura Lee, Beth Pendelton, 



Susie Walton tries for a basket while Tammy Ponder 
quards her opponent ciilK]enlly 



Alexis Dobler sets up a lay up shot against the Maury 
Commodores. 



1 94/ Winter Sports 




Susie Walton fights for and wins tfie ball wfiicfi helped 
Kempsville obtain another victory against Maury. 



Susannah Baxter searches the court for a free team- 
mate to successfully pass the ball to. 






Girls Basketball 






KHS 


OPP 


G.R. 


51 


29 


Kellan 


34 


24 


P.A. 


75 


39 


Bayside 


57 


47 


F.C. 


70 


48 


Cox 


57 


30 


Kellam 


49 


39 


F.C. 


53 


33 


Cox 


58 


37 


Bayside 


52 


54 


G.R. 


52 


40 



T J. Whitehurst tries to decide which teammate, Su- 
sie Walton or Susannah Baxter, to pass the ball to. 



Girls Basketball/ 195 






au-xjiJ^ 



L^^UJis^^^X, 




Reversal On The Mat 

I-^<A.y^^ ^JL^ ^ -^^-^"^ Wrestlers Maintain Proud Kempsville Tradition 

y^ 'XJiy ^'^^'^'^'^ 'Hi "-^^^"^^'^'^-^^ -^^ I ' he mighty matmen of Kempsville 
-^-^^^ ^^ - ,^ fj m. once again proved to be a superior 

_XA^ "■^t-O^^ 'Jy-'C/y^ breed. There are many reasons for the 






ipjjiy^ ZLl^ A>XyT^^una.,M<^lrt' quired by jusj 



-r^^<JZ .^^dJl^ ^^^"^ -"^^ c/>^ 

J^JJU 




Chiefs' success. The victories were not ac- 
one person — it was a team 
effort. In order to find the driving force 
behind the wrestling team, all one must do 
is look at Coach Lowrance. Mr. Lowrance 
seems to come up with winners, year after 
year. 

As almost all coaches will attest, prac- 
tice builds a winner. Since early winter, the 
wrestling team held practices every day 
after school, to perfect moves, build 
strength and agility, and, whenever need- 
ed, loose a few pounds to make weight. 
Obviously, the practice paid off. The wres- 
tlers rolled to an unbelievable 5-1, sending 



eleven wrestlers to regionals. 

The stronghold of the team was the 
lighter weights. The dynamic trio of Jim 
Fussell (105), Steve Martin (112), and Wil- 
lie Kitchen (119) almost always wrestled 
the Chiefs to a great start. The middle 
weights, with standouts, Andy Chaves 
(126), Scott Danielson (132), and Rob Lar- 
more (155) buried the competition. The 
rest was left to the heaveweights, led by 
Scott Whittier (185) and Merlin Swartzen- 
truber (Gnl.). Besides the combination of 
strength, power, and quickness, the exper- 
ience of the juniors and seniors added to 
the wrestlers' dominance on the mat. This 
made the Chiefs one of the most feared 
wrestliing machines in the region. 







Willie Kitchen performs a p)erfect Churella on a help- 
less Bayside wrestler 



196/Winter Sports 




A familiar sight — Steve Martin and Jim Fussell 
enthusiastically cheer on their teammates after a long 

days work. 



Mark Schultz considers his next move while he has a 
momentary advantage. 




Wrestling 






Opp 


KHS 


Princess Anne 


13 


53 


Green Run 


20 


43 


Bayside 


20 


44 


First Colonial 


23 


42 


Keiiam 


20 


43 


Cox 


30 


19 



Row 1: Scott Danielson. Andy Chaves, Willie Kitchen, 
Steve Martin, Jim Fussell, Jay Gonzales. Row 2: Mike 
Clark, Bill Becker, Mark Schultz, Scott Whittier, Mer 



lin Swartzentruber, Robbie Larmore, Troy Tadeo, 
Mark Sokolinsky, Coach Lowrance. 



Wrestling/ 197 



Money! 



Kempsville's businesses and mer- 
chants do more than supply the 
community with quality products and 
valuable services. They also promote the 
common welfare of the people through 
community services, such as providing dis- 
counts for students and senior citizens. 
Buying ads in Kempsville High School's 
yearbook is a service those businesses pro 
vide for the school. Selling ads to local 
merchants accounts for part of the cost of 
the typical annual. When a businessman 
purchases an advertisement, it not only 
gives him necessary exposure, but also 
keeps the yearbook within a reasonable 
price range for the student. 





The Shell gasoline station provides much of its ser 
vice to resident Kempsville families as well as Chiel 
student drivers. 



1 98/ Divider 



While also fulfilling the public's needs, the Kennpsville 
Plaza provides for an invaluable service to the Kemps 
ville yearbook. 



The Tidewater Fish House fulfills all of Kempsville's 
seafood needs. 




Darryl's is a popular dating place for many of Kemps 
ville High School's "Bigger Spenders ". 






Ads/199 



In Memory 




June 20, 1939-December 24, 1983 

With every school year, life brings 
many joys and agonies. It is with 
exceeding sadness that we mourn the 
death of Jerry Sydow. He was a friend as 
well as a teacher to many of us. His pres- 
ence will always be remembered and his 
memory shall live in our hearts forever. 
Although the death of a friend can leave an 
empty space, we must never mourn end- 
ings, for they give way to new beginnings. 



200/ In Memory 



Special Notes 



Good Luck Class of 1984! — KMS 
Weenie Lover & Paco Rabanne 
Lover — We had a great '84 season. 
We couldn't have done it without our 
#1 fans Eric and Donald. Shape up 
for next season, fellow EWOKS! Al 
ways, Marites 

Brad — Thanks for helping me get 
home safely after all those parties. 
Don't ever shave your head again. 
You'll give me another heart attack! 
Stay sweet. Luv, Teresita 

Mommy and Daddy — Thanks for 
all the loving support. You've been 
more like my big sister and big broth- 
er. The parties would not have been 
the same without your "kind contri- 
butions." The gang appreciated it. I'll 
miss ya at college. Love you so 
much! Your "Baby Girl," Marites 

Best Wishes to all in the Class of 
'84! from Miss Tafe 

"Italian Stud" — HA! HA! They 
finally did it. I only hope the book is a 
success. Thanks for all the strange, 
but fun times over the years. Have a 
helluva time at Tech. (1 know you 
will.) Luv, Teresita 

Miss McClain — Thank you so 
much for being very patient with my 
bad bookkeeping. You're a sweet per- 
son who has become a good friend. 
Always, Your Secret Pal 

Emily — These past years would 
not have been the same without an 
awesome pal like you. You've always 
been there for me during the good 
and bad times. Remember Matt's 
toga party/your "evil" curses/Mr. 
"Le Mans"/that long week at State- 
/drooling over Tom Cruise/our cook- 
ing experiment (if you can call it coo- 
king?)/Mr. ChiChi's/AP exam/and 
the yearbook convention with the 
"surfers." K.I.T. Good Luck with the 
guys at Florida. (Save one for me.) 
LYLAS, Teresita 

We are sad to inform Ms. Tafe that 
her young love, David Ladeoux, has 



run off with Betty Brains. 

Peyton. Paige, Sheri. Chris, 
Reina, Carol, — I might have chilled 
and not thrilled you all, but you all 
thrilled me all season long. Kick But 
Mext Cross Country Season. Love, 
Rob 

Fred — What can I say but this is 
it. I'm going to miss you so much 
next year. What am 1 supposed to 
do? Spanish won't be the same (Jy, 
que feo! Anyway . . . I'm not going to 
like being an only child, but thanks 
for being the best brother ever. 
You've given me the best 17 years of 
my life. Love always from your favor- 
ite little playmate, Debbie. 

Suzanne — Thanks for helping me 
through my high school years and 
my "college guys". Love Ya, Lisa. 

Steve and Tanya — Thanks for 
making my study hall great. Love Ya, 
Lisa. 

To the Girls — Thanks for being 
my friends! Lover. 

To my Mother — My best friend. 
Love, Val. 

Have a killer time next year, and 
jam at the State Meet. Good luck 
from all the seniors on the CC Team. 

Pic and girls team — Thanks for 
the great three years. Cherri 

There once was a kaiser named 
Brent — to on of my parties he went. 
Debbie Lentz he did snare — she 
squealed "What's in your hair?" On 
dippity-doo his money was spent! 
PS. Sorry Deb, couldn't resist! And 
Brent, do you still have my hair 
spray? Ha! Barbara Louise Koeppen. 

"Bungi" Koehr — You silly I can't 
believe "The year of the big bunge" 
is over! What can I say? I really hope 
I have the pleasure of knowing you at 
age 25! What a freaky incident! Ha! 
Don't "Marathon" at ROTC or you'll 
go into a frenzy! Times have been 
great! Your friend for ever — Love 
Barb. P.S. We'll go to the NARO 



again to see (friggin' awesome) Pink 
Floyd! And let Kyle get the drinks! 
Ha! 

Rach — Thanks for all good and 
bad. Love always, Julie. 

Stubby — Thanks for the great 
times in English. We love you much 

— matchmen king of the earring 
queens. 

Snotface; Hank Jr., Kewey and 
Spongy — Thanks for the many 
rides and laughs at the many parties. 
W.O.B. 

We were so wasted . . . Am going 
to miss ya'll. Ash, Lynn, Rhonda, and 
Val-Baby (If you graduate?) Love Lis 
(the only real baby alive). 

Ashlie and Lyn — Hears to the 
years that have passed, the fun 
we've had, and a friendship that will 
forever last . . . Remember what 
Chris Rumsey said? Was it "Kiss me 
deadly" or "Flex your head"? Oh — 
Dolph and Ash-2 silhouettes in Broad 
Bay Moonlight! (Clark Sawyer — 
family affair And for me Alex "Lick 
My Face" Darling. Well let's go to 
London! Or N.Y. or Va. Bch! Love 
Forever, Valbaby. 

Good Luck and have a killer time 
next year. Cross Country Cherri. 

Peggie — We finally made it! 
Thanks for being such a great friend! 
Love ya always, Jackie 84. 

B.S. — You make Clyde nervous! 
D.W. 
EWOKS, Good luck next season. 

To my sisters: Beth R. Lisa C, Car- 
ol R. and Chris H. 1 Love You. 

To my Party Pals — Mary, Brad 
S., Brad N., Bruce Doak, The Walk- 
ers, Matt, Stephen and to others: 
Scott C. etc. and everyone 1 left out 

— It's been crazy. Love always — 
Jen. 

Mr. St. Laurent — No doubt about 
it, your class was everything! 






.^^-^a.^ 



^ 




Personal Notes/201 



Special Notes 



Hey Mary! This year was great! 
T.W.O.C. Love ya, Josie 

Chub n Jen — This was a great 
year with ail the laughs. Thanks for 
all the advice y'all gave me when I 
needed it. I'm going to get fat on all 
the pretzels next year — Good luck 
in college. Remember KJR Friends 
always, Joe 

Kim, Beth, Meredith, Theresa 
w/enemies like you, who needs 
friends? Thanks for the memories, 
the last 3 yrs. have been great. Love, 
Barb 

Michelle — may I have a piece of 
gum? Cherri 

Margaret — Ain't nothing gonna 
break our stride . . . What a feeling!! 

To Beth — Its rough out there! 
What goes upstairs never, ever, 
comes down at least not for awhile; 
and to Chris; Ick! Ick! "You'll never 
guess who I saw today . " Love 
Jen 

Scott — Camelot was fun, remem- 
ber? I'll miss you alot! Good luck! I 
love you. Kara 

To Matt (Boo) — I'm the luckiest 
girl in the world! Thanks for being 



Donna Forbes and David Harris 
practice "PDA", public display of 
affection, despite administrators' ef- 
forts to erase 'the problem 



mine. You'll always be my champi- 
on. Yours "faithfully", Ashley 

Mary — Thanks for everything. I 
love you, Andi 

B-Boss — Its been great working for 
you this year! Good luck at ND Love 
n Kisses K-Baby 

Dear Big Wave Rider — I love you 
Stokey, especially in 20 to 30 mile 
North Easterly winds! Love Girlie 

Ginger — You are the best friend 
and sister a girl could have. Dana 

To Carol R — Do pretzels really 
have babies? No more bald boys 
please! "Bald boys need not apply " 

Mrs. Cross — Wha be happenin'. 
Darrin and Abe (The talkers) 
David — Big hands don't necessarily 
make a man. Mike 

Boodle — Thanks for everything! 
Who would have thought that needle 
would have been lucky? Remember 
all the great times. Billy Joel, "this is 
the BHS party connection ", lotsa 
2.69 non-foods, our summer party. 
Police etc . . . We may be going sepa- 
rate ways, but I'll always love you. 

Rob M., Mike A., Jim B.. Donnie 
J., & Ronnie J. — Thanks for all the 



HA HAS in lunch last year. I've 
missed seeing y'all this year & I'm 
gonna miss ya' even more next year! 
SWM 

Puppydog — Call us when you 
reach puberty. 

Drew — Choke! Me 

Susie — Hey Spaz! We've done 
some wild things: squirt guns. Blue 
Hawaii, carsleepin', t. paper, and just 
bein crazy! Thanx for always being 
there for me! 1 luv ya, SAN 

Joan & Dixie — To my "Pepsi 
Drinkin "' friends. Little White Cars 
are #1. The Boss Rules! Love, Julie 

Kevin — 1 have yet to be corrupted, 
ha ha and get your haircut Love, Fay 

Mrs. Matteson — Thank you for 
all the nice gifts and for making my 
Senior year special. Your secret pal 

To the little Flips — Ewoks — 
live forever!! 2nd placed Ewok 

Embily — Thanks for all the rides 
and you need to teach me the tech- 
niques of the runwalk. 

Mr. June — Keep that sexy body 
fit! Fr. Playgirl readers Rm. 400 



202/ Personal Notes 




Catching a moment between classes, these 
juniors scout the halls for possible dates for 
Ring Dance 




Slurp-Blah! Love always, Guess 
who? 

Karen — Goober! We've done a lot 
of crazy things over the years! Ski- 
ing, car wrecks — hupcap, aspace, 
Clash, Police, findin parties, etc. 
Want to thank you for being a best 
friend. You'll always be a part of me, 
and our friendship will always hold a 
special place in my heart. I luv ya, 
SAN 

Julie (Jules) — What a great 
name! Thank you for being a friend! 
Love, Julie (Jules) 

Kinky woman — the whipped 
cream was terrific! Keep in touch! 
Love you lots, A 

Donna Kee — Even though I don't 
see you much anymore, those days 
of the eyelash faces won't be forgot- 
ten! Chester 

Hey Turdhead: Keep track of your 
camer^i and I love chocolate cake. 

Groovy Tom — Maybe you'll be 
the lucky one that goes to Tech with 
this WILD WOMAN! You know its a 
joke. CHESTER 



Big Brother Stevey — hi Love ya, 
sis 

John S. — Someone loves you! 
Anonymous 

To Brad. Matt, Barb, Donna. Lisa, 
Mary, Kris. Steve. Scott. Fred. Eric. 
Jimmy, Cavie, Susan. Ted, David. 
Steve S.. Laura, Sharon S., Karen, 
Mike, Jerry, etc . . . Ya'll made these 
the "best days of my life." (Good 
luck with everything! Love, Andi 

Yo Diane — Wo bist das fleish? 
Why did the midget kill himself? If 
you stop singing "Tiny Bubbles" 
Roger will stop "Turnin' on the heat" 
Okay? Roger and Abe. P.S. — 
BLAH!!! 

Brad (BJ) — Thanks for everyth- 
ing and all your help. Keep smokin'. 
Mike 

Dave — I love you — Josie 

Beth — Congratulations! Good 
luck in college. The Kelly's 

Dear KHS girls' soccer team — 
never let it be said that we aren't the 
best! Playing w/most of you for the 
past 5 or 6 yrs has been purely excel- 



lent! Here's to the good times! And a 
note to the boys' team, we've en- 
joyed watching your wonderful legs! 
Thanks guys! Ha! see Y'all at the par- 
ties! Luck to all. Barb 

Rob — Remember what you're 
supposed to drink and do the night 
before a race. 

KHS Thespians — We love you! 
You're two favorite BeBops 

Love ya Romiette Love, Romeo 

Sean — I'll miss ya at college. I 
luv you. San 

Di — If you're ever bored on a 
Sunday afternoon. Call me! We'll go 
have tacos at the beach! and remem- 
ber, IT JGST DOESN'T MATTER! 
Strawberry fields forever! Julette 

Kris — I love you! A 

TRF — Sorry to hear about Fritzi! 
We've made it through a lot — even 
when the "CHIPS" were down (GET 
IT?)! Best of luck next year! SWM 

Brian and David — You'll always 
be our puppydog and Dutch boy. 



Personal Notes/203 



Special Notes 



Brandon and Kerry, Thanks for all 
the special memories we shared to- 
gether! I know there's lots more to 
come! You're my best friends ever! 
I'll love yall always! Brenda 

Courtney. Doreen, Maggie, Mike, 
T.J.. Donald, Dan, and the rest of 
the gang. Thanks for the great times! 
it was fun and the laughs were many! 
I'm going miss all of yall! Take care! 
Love ya lots, Brenda 

KHS Cheerleaders & Ms. Moran, I 
love all of yall! The good times and 
even the bad were very special! 
Thanks for putting up with me! Good 
Luck next year! Love, Witchy Poo 
(Brenda) 

Mag, You're the best "best friend" 
ever. Thanx for always being there 
for me. ill always be here for you. 
We've shared some great times to- 
gether! All our "Secret Rendevous "! I 
love you Mag and 1 hope we remain 
as close as we are now, for the rest of 
our lives. Luv U! Dor 

Matthew, Ever since the 7th grade 
there has been a special part of my 
heart for you. We've shared a lot of 
special moments together and we've 



During lunch, students take time off their busy sched 
ules to catch up on the latest gossip. 




shared a lot of love too. Even though 
we've gone our separate ways there 
will never be a day when we say 
good-bye. Good Luck and I'm gonna 
miss you very much. I luv you! Love 
Endlessly, Doreen 

Well I made it to the 12th grade 
finally after four years of trying. And 
I'd like to thank all of my friends who 
helped me through it all, See ya next 
year!! Jim Miller (Big Guy) 

To Alden — Oh Baby, I want you 
sooo bad! From Amy 

Evita — It's been great working 
w/u. You're a great sponsor and 
friend. T 

Jane — Hey Wench. How G B? 
Don't spend your summer picking 
your nose. T Lecher 

Susan M — No more A. P. parties. 
You've been a great friend. Theeresa 

Koehrbear — Look out for Pink 
Floyd movies. You've got great legs. 
GOOD LGCK at ND. Theresa F. 

Kevin S. (muscle man) — All 
those times in Physics. We weren't 
turning around to look at the clock. 
SM and TF 

Jodi — You're a great friend. 



Green Run parties, guys, and YL got 
us through. Theresa 

To Kelly, Angie, Angelia, & Sandy 
— Let's Party!!!! From Amy 

Let's go Shrooming Palmer. Mark 
Henry 

Geoffrey — I never thought the ski 
trip would lead to this. It's been 3 
memorable years. You were a big 
part of my high school days. 
Through some rough times, we've 
managed to stay close friends. Good 
Luck as a Sr! You've got a lot of 
talent and ability, so don't forget 
that. #41 is #1! I'm always here for 
you. I'll love you always. Maggie 

Boomer, I'm going to miss you! 
You're my "special" guy! Make me 
proud next year. I love you more 
than I can say. Love you, Kerry 

Bren, You're the best friend ever. 
Ker 

Hey Gang! Thanx for making my 
senior year great: "Ewok," Craig, 
Theresa, Ted, Liesl, Rich, Fred, Fay, 
Teresita. Remember the "Dead 
Zone," Mario's, and Craig's raffle 
cake, football games at float, "The 
Telephone Play " (by me), 



204/ Personal Notes 




THE ski trip, the Haunted House; 
ChiChi's (fried ice cream, YGK!) and 
let's not forget iceskating & parties, 
It's been fun and interesting, huh? 
Don't forget we will have the sum- 
mer! PS. Since most of y'all are on 
yearbook could you lease make sure 
my name is spelled right! I love y'all, 
Joan 

To Lisa and Tanya — To my two 
angels, this year wouldn't have been 
complete without you two. You'll 
both mean a lot to me. Let's always 
keep in touch. Love, Steve 

Jeff Jones, you're really special 
to me A.L.W. 

T.A.P. — Your senior year is sup- 
posed to be the best, and you've 
made this one so very special. No 
matter where I go, far or near, I will 
always be as close as ever. Forever 
M.A.C. 

Danny G. You are very special to 
me, and I will always care. Love, Kim 
Z. 

Paul, Blink-Blink, It's been a good 
year, but watch the salt in your diet 
(we know you cheat) 

To the 83-84 FLAG TEAM: thanks 
for putting up w/me. Though we 
may never march together again, 
we'll always be the KEMPSVILLE 
GUARD. Debbie Wanzong 

Mel: Three Muskateers Forever! 

Ronnie, Thanks for all the special 
times we've had. You're very special 
and I'll always love you. Kim 

SNM 4E, THANKS FOR THE 
MEMORIES! LOVE 5 

BK. KC. SC, SW. and SP, you are 
great friends. Never eat plants, 
they're bad for you. MOB 

Jen and Carol ask . . Kevin 
Stone, how 'bout a picnic at your 
house? Scott Hoffman, have you 
seen any good statues lately? Doak 
Harbison, will you ever stand still? 
Bruce Spiva, will you ever gain any 
weight? Matt and Brad, will you ever 
get married? to each other? and to all 
of the above thanx for one crazy high 
school career. 

Suze — Well, it's been a good 
year. Remember: "Animal King- 
dom, " Sergio's Suze the Wrestler," 
fourth bell, the bikini! Ms. Espirit, 
people who stare, and all the good 
times. Good luck and have fun at Rad 
Love, Paige 

JH — Thanks for everything. 
You've made my senior year very 
special. Let's make the many years 
to come even better. I love you. PB 

CWX 2 — I'm going to miss you 
guys a wicked lot I love y'all. DLH 

To the rascals, et al. You've made 
saying good-bye the hardest thing 
I've ever done. Chicken 

To the best friends I could ever 




have — Chris, Kel, Deb, Mar, Car, 
and of course the ever-faithful 
pledge-partner — Deb Lentz. We've 
had the best times possible. Anytime 
you want me to wash your feet, 1 will. 
Well Girls, my creative mind is failing 
— see you in North Carolina. Hey, do 
you think I'll ever be well again? Love 
you all — (Bird Brain, the Gimp) Lis. 
Lisa (a.k.a. pledge-partner) — It's 
been great in yearbook this year. I'm 
glad we became pals. BUT, I've espe- 
cially loved staring at your gorgeous 
face every Monday morning during 
first bell as we salute our country 
together. Good Luck next year; I'll 
miss ya. Deb 

To the gang in 6th bell — (Anete, 
Julie, Kristin, Liz, Lisa, etc.) — 
Thanks for a great year. The potty 
parties have been great as well as 
taking strolls in the halls. Next year 
will be even better. Love ya all, Deb 

To my dearest, dearest Fred, It's 
been a wonderful nine months carry- 
ing our child. Your ever-faithful, Lisa. 

Little Deb, Kristin. Julie, etc. — 
you made YB what it was — Potty 
parties! Can't wait til next year. A.V. 

David — Thanks for helping make 
my senior year the best year ever. I 
will never forget you "calf." Always 
be happy! All my love, Robin 

Mike — Thank you for being the 
best friend a girl could ever have, not 
to mention lab partner. What a team! 
Love, Robin 



Eric Stroup shows no fear as he labors long hours on 
the roof painting the senior class sign. 



^QQ, u^ cyr^c i-^ syy\v^r^ 




r 



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^ 



Personal Notes/205 



Special Notes 



Rob. Aim. and Kel's laughs: State 
of Confusion — Looking for Trouble 
— Send in the Clowns — Ostrich, 
Deputy Dog, Cookie Monster, Tim- 
Tim Bears, ChiChi's, Frank Perdue, 
Weed-eater, Paul's Pub, King Crim- 
son, Taxi!!!, Mole!, Pirate!!, Willie 
Walrus, Luke Skywalker, STAND- 
BACK!!!!, Bonnie Fever, Gypsies, 
Tramps, and Thieves, Darth Vader, I 
wish I had a camera, It has been nice 
travelin' with ya. Let's go to People's, 
"Shut up beef jerky", There's a pick 
le on Main Street!!!, Oscar De La Rent 
a pour Lui, I heard if you mix oil and 
sand you get a better tan!!!!. Lower 
the volume!. If I only had a gun!, Do 
you want me to prove I am not 
queer?. Just call me Beth, There's a 
man in the army sitting in there!!. 
You hit the nail right on the head!!. 
Let's go to the tanning booth!, Crime- 
Solvers!, Let's go to Rock, Quick 
Weight Loss, Risky Business, Beaver 
Cleaver, Oh, the machine is off, 



Bush, It's Mon, the brown jumper, 
something furry is in my pocket, call 
a tow truck — look 3!!!, Where's my 
tape?, Iss????, Monzola made the 
cookies, Iceburg Lettuce, time for an 
attitude check. Let's go to the Creep 
Show, Our friend (he's dead!) we 
need batteries!, all our friends at R.C., 
sorry I dented your car!, Shanana- 
gin!, Blackrock Market! — It's been 
laughs! 1983-1984 Amy Robin, Kel 
ley 

Carol D. Come away with me to 
England Adam Ant 

Suzy E and Cosette L Thanx for 
coming to see me on Feb 7. We will 
meet again in "Montreal" where we'll 
see "Puff 'N Boots" who lives with 
the "King of the Wild Frontier" We'll 
"strip " If you don't have much "van- 
ity ", Why? You ask Cuz I'm a "play- 
boy " and I want to kiss you both 
"nanel to neck " if you are not a 
"goody two shoes " Adam Ant 

MG — Here's to — 10-ing it! LGV 



IMG — THAINX 4 ALL 

MOST VULGAR SR GIRLS — 

'Member the fun parties, guys, find- 
ing the rocks to hide behind, football 
games, dancing on PA RD — esp 
lunch — Luck and love Giggies 

Ted — do I REALLY get to buy. 
you lunch when you're 35? 

Dor? Where to start? We graduat- 
ed! Had our doubts about that, huh? 
You're the best "best friend " ever. In 
you I've found a true friend. We've 
had some wild times — don't forget 
any of them. We could always count 
on each other when down about G.F. 
and M.L. Those days are over. Col- 
lege bound we are. You'll be a great 
roomie. I love you M.T.Y.L.T.T.! Your 
bestest buddy Mags 

Cindy Lou — It's been 3 years — 
from Ms. Miller to Ms. Pleasants. I 
always consider you my best friend 
— no matter how varied our lives 
become. Love Kristin 







/ // - yjf . Kyle Green. Vyc Carolino. Bruce Spiva. and Fred 

.^ii^*/?T^l/^vt£/Z-^ <i2'^'^-^' ^2.-«X^ -''^^■'^ Leniz work dihqenlly on the Sign for theclassof 84' to 



display during the school year. 



Ij/ T^<^ ^L/^ " -^ r • M — A A /) i / uispidy uuiiny mf bi ruxji yt-<ji. 






'^^^^'^ c^thZ/ Q^ ,^.^ .,^,^»»v«s<<i- 2^u<y^ . 



206/ Personal Notes 






My fav lunch table — BS. MT, 

MB, DW, FL, AG, AS, TG, CH — 
Thanx! Luv, MG 

JEN, Thank you for always being 
there, to lend a hand to show you 
care, and if I had to do it all over 
again, I wouldn't trade you, for an- 
other friend. Memories are . . . your 
open house, Bodyman, MAK Porter, 
mud babies, IR bowling, Duke (storm 
the dorm), and STING!!! Love Carol 

Zeke. Thanks for all the love and 
friendship you have given me. I'll see 
you in ten years (remember?). I'll 
come find you on the beaches in Ca- 
lif. Love you forever, Ruthie 

BDJ, We finally made it! So where 
do we go from here? Onward! I hope 
we can find the right guys someday! 
Too bad we have to wait! Thanx for 
being a great friend. Love and friend- 
ship always CLR 

Jimmy. Have fun at VMI. Don't 
forget to call when you're home and 
write while you're gona. I'll miss you! 
I hope you don't forget about me 
after using all of those MB girls. I'll be 
sure not to forget about you. Love 
forever, Carol 

JENNIFER, Are your eggs rolling 
today? Hey Chubby! Hew Years Eve. 
The beach. Being there. Listening, 
Toll booths. "He's such a jerk " Ten- 
nis gods. Kyle ugh Chichis. 1984 . . . 
The memories are endless. I'm really 
going to miss you, our friendship has 
been the greatest!! You'll never be 
forgotten (sorry I'm such a crab) 
What can I say? I love you Annice 

Karen. This is just one big Thanks 
To you and Wayne. Y'all have been 
the greatest I love you both Annice 

Kevin — You still have a great 
body — see you in Paris — L(JV ya 
lots — ANGIE 

CHUCK W — *LOVE YOGR EYES 
— but watch it they could get you in 
trouble — know what 1 mean — 
Love Angle 

Gata, I love you forever! Pookie 

Class of 85' — "The Class " — 
Best of luck in our senior year. Eliza- 
beth Jenkins 

Welch grape jelly — Thanks for 
everything you big hairy dummy! 
Best of Luck & Love Ya! Liz 

SKIPPER — Thanks for being 
there — Whether it be for comfort or 
just comic relief — You're wonder- 
ful! — Liz 

Nease, I'm "analyzing the situa- 
tion" and I know that I'm going to 
miss you lots! What am I going to do 
about football games and Friday 
nights? And what about my driving 



lessons? Just remember one thing, 
INease, I'll always love ya! Love, Jen 
nifer 

TL. CH. FA. RH. FL. JC. and the 
rest of the gang — Remember the 
BONFIRE, football, the float, ""Fred 
not the TOES! " Thanks for being the 
wild and wonderful friends that you 
are! ALOHA, LISA 

Eric. Rich. Craig. — May the 
guardian ewok forever protect your 
kneecaps! Love, Ewok 

LF, smile — you are the difference 
between weird and strange! Lotsa 
love, Little one 

Father Richard and Sister There- 
sa, if all else fails join a papal institu- 
tion! Mother Inferior 

Mere. Thanks for a great year! Re- 
member the H,C, and N.Y. parties, 
THEFri. afternoon, and "the DUDS" 
D,S, "the STUDS" C,D! I Luv Ya! 
Michele 

Liz and Kerry. 1 am so glad that we 
all got to become such good friends 
this year. You both made first and 
second bells worth going to. Thanks 
for always "being there " and listen- 
ing to my many worries and frustra- 
tions. Love, Kristin 

Steve. I LOVE YOU — April 

Capt. Camo still lives. Heavy Met- 
al Ruiz. 

Maggie May — Thanks for ever- 
ything. Kristin Kay 

Mags. Dor — It's finally over! 
"You Know That" Kris 



To my 84' buddies — Sorry about 
the Princess Anne detour — When 
you return to the Beach from college 
life — make sure to reserve the Jen- 
kins Party Bus. Love You All — Liz 

Congratulations Rich! Love Ya! 
Elizabeth PS. Take lessons from a 
Texan on how to hold a fork. 

Eric — Do ducks play soccer, too? 
Elizabeth 

Scott — Enjoyed the imported cui- 
sine of fruit roll ups and chocolate 
doughnuts at lunch. I'll miss ya! — 
keep in touch — Elizabeth 

ECJ #2 — Remember Blobs, 
forms, bouncemen, GAH's, legs, 
eggs, and baboon women. — Thanks 
for the memories! Love You — EU 
#1 

Jill Comess We are going to have 
a great time this summer Love Ya 
Tammy 

Tom Ford You are sexy, love your 
body. Don't be looking in people's 
windows who own guns. 

Tom, This summer we're going to 
SURF with the locals at Rodanthe 

BK — nice legs!!! 

HOFF. TED. W.A.D. lives forever! 
MO 

Cheerleaders, Thanks for all your 
support! It is deeply appreciated. 
You're the best! The 1983-84 Chiefs 




Eric Taylor takes a break from his studying to 
smile for the camera. 



Personal Notes/207 



It's Been Crazy 
Class Of '84 




Lisa Spruill 
Carrie West 

Anne Castles 

Bruce Spiva 

Fred Lentz 

Mike Morris 

Joe Tinkler 

Ted Glickman 
Chris Wunderly 



Mike Anderson 

Jim Buddo 

Ronnie Jones 

Sandy Berry 

Donnie Jones 

Angelia Worth 

JoAnne Pontillo 

Karen Pocock 

Jim Miller 



Kathy Pocock 

Becky Mohap 

Theresa Labyak 

Eric Stroup 
David Walker 

Fay Aromin 

Lisa Martin 

Barbara Koeppan 

Brenda Jones 

Raz Bueno 



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The Class Of '85 Extends Its Congratulations To The Class Of '84 



Maureen Thompson 

Monica Buckley 

Elizabeth Jenkins 

Jenny Kahara 
Beth Stephenson 

Debbie Lentz 
Diane Humphries 
Barry Dickman 
Scott Leonard 
Skip Davis 
Linda Gard 
Chrissie Capwell 
Steve Radigan 
Kristin Ma^^ 



Good Luck! 

Mary Conway 

Beth Bryant 

Brenda Chasse 

David Lutz 

Brian Cafritz 

Curtis Skolnick 
Clay Petry 

Kirk Falk 

Tammy Bloom 

Tina Luzzi 

Kelly West 



Mike Spitalney 
Lauri Bochert 

Andrea Carroll 

Donna Forbes 

Melissa Grehawick 

Jill Jamison 

Kim Maynard 

Sarla Katepelli 

Christine DeJesus 

Stephanie Cronk 

Pecanne Condon 



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Class Of '84 



Bill Abele — Treaty staff 12 
Scoff Abshire — Industrial Arts Club 10. 11; 
VICA 12 

Teresa Lynn Adams — FHA 10, 11: DEC A 12; 
Office Help 1 1 ; JA 12 

Angela Lynn Adkins — FHA 12; DECA 10. 11; 
Guidance Help 1 1; Young Life 10; Coordinator 
and model in 1982- 1983 Spring Fashion Show 
11 

Amy Dawn Altman — DECA 1 1, Who's Who 
11. 12; Outdoor Track 10; Spanish Honor Soci- 
ety 10, 11. 12; Trihiy 10; Young Life 10, 11, 
12. 

Craig Alexander — General Activities 
IV. Stuart Allison — Key Club 11. 12; Wres- 
tling 10 

Michaels. Anderson —VJbos Who 1 1; Public- 
ity Committee 12 

Rod R. Annet — Industrial Arts Club 11, 12; 
Who's Who 12, Art Show 10, 11, 12; Senior 
Sign Committee 12; Image 12. 
Amy Arnold — FBLA 10, 11; FHA 12; DECA 
11, 12; Young Life 10, 11, 12 
Fay Aromin — Image staff 10, 11, 12; Key 
Club 11; Fundraising Chairman; Homecoming 
Committee; Prom Committee; Graduation 
Committee; Class Olympics 
Kimberly Ames Auer — FHA 11, 12; DECA I 1 
Paul Reitelbach — Industrial Arts Club 10. 11, 
12; Science Club 11, 12; Junior and Senior 
Class Activities; Prom Committee 12; Home 
coming Committee 11, 12; Ring Dance Com- 
mittee 1 1 

Tency Bachman — French Club 10, 11; Art 
Show 12 

Cherri Annette Bailey — Varsity Club 12; 
Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 12; 
Outdoor Track 10, 11, 12; Young Life 12 
Debbie Bailey — Industrial Arts Club 12; FHA 
12; Art Show 12 



Anthony Martin Baker — VICA 11; DECA 10. 
Robin Rene Barnette — Spanish Club 10; 
VICA 11. 12; VICA President — 12; SCA 10. 
11; Presidents' Club: Young Life 10 
Patricia A Barnes — FHA 12 
Jodi L Barrett — DECA 12 
Trisha Anne Barrow — COE 12 
Tefa Barry — Debate 10; Thespians 10. 11. 
12; Thespian Secretary 12; hational Honor So- 
ciety 11, 12; Who's Who 11, 12; Fall Play 
Musicals 10, 11, 12; Leadership Workshop 11; 
SCA Treasurer 1 1 

Chris Barton — Varsity Club 11, 12 — Vice 
President: ICC 12; Who's Who 11, 12; Indoor 
Track 12; Outdoor Track 10, 11, 12; Young 
Life 10, 11, 12 

Maureen Bastek — Varsity Club 11, 12; ICC 
12; General Assembly 12; National Honor Soci- 
ety 1 2; Field Hockey 10, 11, 12; Soccer 10, 11, 
12; Leadership Workshop 12; Vice President 
Class Officer 1 2; Young Life 10, 11. 12; Senior 
Secret Pal 12 

Stephanie Lynn Baumann — German Club 12; 
DECA 10. 11; SCA 10. 12; Junior Achieve- 
ment 12 

Joel Baydush — VICA 11. 12 
Bonnie Lee Beat — Treaty staff 11, 12; Span- 
ish Club 11, 12; FHA 12 — Historian/Re 
porter; Marching Band 10, 11; Spanish Honor 
Soiety 11, 12; Senior Secret Pal 12 
Marie Amelia Beasley — French Club 1 1; Lat 
in Club 10; Key Club 12; Science Club 12; 
Leadership Workshop 12; SCA 10, 12; Guid- 
ance Help 12 

R. Craig Belda — Spanish Club 10; Industrial 
Arts Club 10; Baseball 12 
John Thomas Belechak — Spanish Club 10; 
Soccer 10, 11. 12 

David Bell — German Club 11. 12; Industrial 
Arts Club 11. 12; Science Club 1 1. 12; Who's 




Seniors And! Stepnick, Brad Shaw, Ted Gllckman. 
David Walker and Malt Thompson enjoy one of 
their last meals in Kempsville's cafeteria. 



Who 12; Marching Band 10 

Joyce E Bell — General Activities 

Martha Blanche Bell — FBLA 10. 11; FHA 11. 

12; DECA 11; Marching Band 10 

Nancy Kathryn Belote — FBLA 10; General 

Assembly 10. 11. 12; Young Life 10, 11; Senior 

Secret Pal 12 

Gil Benham — Varsity Club 11; Boys' State 

11; Basketball 10. 12; Baseball 10. 11. 12; 

Football 10. 11. 12; Homecoming Float 10 

James Bergen — Art Show 11, 12; AP Art 

Steve R Berman — Spanish Club 11; Art 

Show 12; JA 12 

Sandra G Berry — LA 10, 12; FHA 12; DECA 

1 1; Outdoor Track 10; Tri-hi y- 10; Young Life 

10, 12 

David Beshirs — Treaty staff 11, 12; Cross 
Country 1 1 ; Outdoor Track 10, 11; Young Life 
11 

John T Bianco — Spanish Club 10; Industrial 
Arts Club 11, 12; Science Club 11. 12; Video 
Club 12; Marching Band 10. 11, 12; Fall Play, 
Musicals 12 

Heather Black — FBLA 11.12; SCA 12; Senior 
Secret Pal 12; Homecoming Committee 12; 
Young Life 10; Prom Committee 12; Gradu 
ation Committee 12 

Wendy Jean Blancher — Who's Who 11; Of- 
fice Help 11; Young Life 10 
K Suzanne Blevins — Montage staff 1 1 ; Trea 
ty staff 11. i2; FHA 12; Thespians 11. 12; 
General Assembly 11; Video Club 11, 12; Fall 
Play, Musicals 10, 11. 12; Library Help 10. 11; 
Fundraiser Committee Chairperson 1 1; Young 
Life 11, 12; Homecoming Committee 10, 11; 
Fundraising Committee 10; Publicity Commit- 
tee 10, 11; Ring Dance Committee 11; TV 
Show 1 1; Talent Show 10; Co-captain of Class 
Olympics 12 

Beth Boette — Basics President 12; FBLA 10; 
Who's Who 12; Talent Show 10; Office Help 
11; Junior Achievement 10; German Ex- 
change Student 1 1 

James Todd Bone — Homecoming Float Com- 
mittee 10, 1 1 

Ronald Bonney — General Activities 
Emily Ruth Bordy — Image staff 11, 12 — 
copy editor hational Honor Society 11. 12; 
Girls' State 11; Who's Who 12; Tennis 11. 12 
Mike CCBoudell — Treaty staff 12. Latin Club 
10; Art Show 11. 12; Wargames Club 11. 12 
Shelia Bowen — FBLA 10. 11. 12; FHA 12; 
COE 12; Office Help 11; Library Help 10 
Rhonda Renee Boyle — FBLA 10; Thespians 
10; Fall Play. Musicals 10. 11 
Charles Bradley — Industrial Arts Club 1 1 
Chris Brenner — Young Life 11. 12 
Hampton Brewer — VICA 12 
Daige Brice — Spanish Club 12. DECA 12; 
SCA 10 
Ronald Briscoe — Wrestling 11; Young Life 

11, 12 

Adam C Brown — Wrestling 10 
Cheryl Deanne Brown — Marching Band 10, 
11. 12; Marching Band Section Leader 12; 
Ring Dance Committee 1 1 ; Solo and Ensemble 
10. 11. 12 

Pamela Brown — VICA 12 
Sharon L Brown — Spanish Club 10; Key Club 
11; Basics 10; FBLA 10. 11; FHA 11; Chorus 
10. 11; Concert Choir 12; Junior Achievement 
10, 11, 12 

Thomas M. eroivn — Basketball 10, 11, 12 — 
Captain; Outdoor Track 11, 12; Class Council 
10, 12; Spanish National Honor Society 10, 11, 
12; Campaign Manager Senior Class Presiden- 
cy II; Homecoming Float Committee 10 
LynneESz-yanf — FHA 1 1 ; COE 12; JA 11, 12 
James S Buddo — Key Club 11; FHA 12; 



220/Seniors Stats 



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Publicity Committee 12; Homecoming Com 

mittee 12 

Araceli "Raz" Bueno — industrial Arts Club 

11, 12 Secretary; Key Club 11; Who's Who I I. 

12 

Jacqueline Faye Bunting — German Club 10, 

11, Secretary, 12; Foreign Language Week; 

Key Club 11; Science Club 12; FHA 11; Who's 

Who 11, 12; Secret Pal Worker, Senior Secret 

Pal 

Tammy Maria Burdette — FBLA 10; FHA 11; 

DECA 12; Homecoming Committee 10 

Calvin L. Burke — General Activities 

Karia M. Bush — Montage staff 1 1; Spanish 

Club 10; Marching Band 10, 11, 12 — Color 

Guard Captain 12; Regional Band 10, 12, Ju 

nior Achievement 11, 12; Senior Secret Pal 

Kevin Anson Cahoon — Varsity Club 11, 12; 

Video Club 10, 1 1 — Pres. 12; Tres.; ICC. 12; 

Football 10; Wrestling 10, 11; S.C.A. 10, 11, 

12; Library Help 10, 1 1; Young Life 10, 11, 12; 

Campainers 10, 11, 12; Student Trainer 10, 1 1 

11 

Alden Elizabeth Caldwell — French Club 10; 

Gymnastics Mgr. 10; Young Life 10, 11, 12; 

Campaigners 1 1 

Julie K. Callis — FBLA 10, 12; FHA 11 

Linda Campbell — Montage Staff 1 1 ; Spanish 

Club 11; Science Club 11; Who's Who 12; 

Marching Band 10 

Walter Campbell — General Activities 

David Allen Capwell — Image staff 12; French 

Club 10, 11; Key Club 10, 11; Science Club 11, 

12; Indoor Track 12; Outdoor Track 12; Gifted 

Program 12; Young Life 10, 11, 12 

Jill Marie Carlton — Treaty Staff 11, 12; 

French Club 10, 11; Library Help 11, 12; Guid 

ance Help 10 

April Lyn Carpenter — FHA 10, 11, 12 

Joan Carollo — Montage staff 11; Key Club 

11, 12; Science Club 10 FHA 10 — Sec; Fall 

Play, Musicals 11; Fund Raising Chr. Key 

Club; Young Life — 10, 11, 12 

Margaret Colette Carriker — Treaty staff 1 1 , 

12 — Feature Editor; Spanish Club 10, 11; 

Thespians 10, 22, 12 — Treasurer; ICC 10, 

11; Video Club 11, 12; Chorus 11; Fall Play, 

Musicals 10, 11, 12 — Director Class Council 

10, 11, 12; One-Act Festival 11, 12 
Kimberly H. Cason — FBLA 1 1 ; FHA 1 1 ; Class 
Officer 11; FBLA Telephone Chairperson 11; 
FHA Sec. 11 

Anne C. Castles — French Club 10, 11; Indus- 
trial Arts Club 11, 12; Key Club 11, 12; Young 
Life 10, 11 

Kim Caudle — General Activities 
Lisa Marie Cerchiaro — French Club 12; 
S.C.A. 10; Junior Achievement Vice President 

11, 12; Girls Weightlifting 11 

Victoria Paige Chalfin — Montage staff 10, 11, 
12 — Art Editor; Art Show 10, 11, 12; Spanish 
Honor Society 11, 12 

Miguel Andy Chaves —Who's Who 12; Wres- 
tling 10. 11, 12; S.C.A 10; Spanish Honor 
Society 

Lilly Chen — Montage slaff 11, 12 — Reading 
Staff Editor; French Club 10, 11, 12; Latin 
Club 11; Key Club 11; Science Club 11, 12; 
General Assembly 1 1; National Honor Society 
— 12 Treasurer; Governor's School 11; Na- 
tional Merit Scholarship 12; Who's Who 11, 
12; Leadership Workshop 11; Ledger Star 
Scholastic Team 1; S C.A. 11; Graduation 
Chairman 

Kimberly Y. Cherry — Science Club 1 1; VICA 
10, 11, 12; Junior Achievement 11, 12 
Vinny Chiusano — Basketball 10 — Mgr.; Of- 
fice Help 12; Junior Achievement 12 



Barry Chovitz — Debate 10; Forensics 11, 12; 
Thespians 10, 11, 12 — Vice President 12; 
National Honor Society 12; Fall Play, Musicals 
10, 11, 12; Light Crevi/ Chief II, 12; 
Warren Christie — Key Club 11, 12; Varsity 
Club 12; National Honor Society II. 12; Who's 
Who II; Football 11, 12; Outdoor Track 12; 
Leadership Workshop 12; S.C.A — 2nd Vice 
President 12, Young Life 12 
Ronald S Clarke — General Activities 
Scoff William Clark — Forensics 10, 11, 12; 
Thespians 10, II, 12 — President; ICC. 12; 
Who's Who 12; Fall Play, Musicals 10, 11 — 
Lead, 12 — Lead; Homecoming Court 12; 
SCA 10, 11, 12; Morning Announcements 
12; Young Life 10, 11, 12; Campaigners 11,12 
Amy Elizabeth Cluverius — French Club 10; 
Science Club 12; FBLA 10; FHA 10; General 
Assembly 11, 12; Gymnastics Mgr 10, S.C.A. 
12 

Gayle Marie Colson — General Activities 
Karen Anne Colucci — Varsity Club 12; Na- 
tional Honor Society 11, 12; Who's Who 12; 
Soccer 10, 11, 12; Young life 12 
Sandy S. Cohen — Montage staff 10; French 
10, 11; Latin Club 10; Varsity Club 12; Field 
Hockey 10, 12; Soccer 10, 11, 12 
Sfeve Comeau — VICA 12 
Jill E. Comess — Cheerleaders 10; FHA 11; 
DECA 12; Weight Lifting Club 10 
Duane P Compton — Marching Band 10; Ju- 
nior Achievements 12 

Diana Lynn Cooper — Soccer 1 1; S.C.A. 10 — 
Pres (Out of District) Office Help 11; 
Kenneth A1. Cooperman — Variety Show 10 
Kelly Anne Copeland — FHA 1 1 ; DECA 11,12 
— Treasurer; ICC. 1 1; Young Life 10, 11, 12 
Lisa Robin Counts — FBLA 10; FHA 10, 12; 



Wrestling 10; Art Show 12; S.C.A. 12; Office 
Help 11; Young Life 10, 11. 12 
Pamela Faye Courtney — Spanish Club 10, 
1 1; FBLA 10 

Wanda Carol Cowan — French Club 10. 11; 
Industrial Arts Club 12; Senior Secret Pal 12 
Danny Cueros — Spring Musical 12 
Nannette Faye Cullom — Atonfage staff 11,12 
— Art Editor; Art Show 11, 12; Gallery '83 
Amanda Cummings — FBLA 11. 12; COE 12 
Scott Cummings — DECA 12; Baseball 10 
Dan Curran — Treaty staff II, 12 
Scott Danielson — Wrestling 10, 11, 12 
Jeff Darrah — Marching Band 10, 11; Show 
Choir 12; Fall Play. Musicals 11. 12; Regional 
Band 11; Regional Chorus 12; S.C.A. 11; Ju- 
nior Achievement 12 

A. Lyn Daughtrey — Treaty staff 10; DECA 
12; Fall Play, Musicals 10; Tri-Hi-Y 10; Young 
Life 10, 1 1 

Amy L. Davenport — VICA 10, 12 
Frank Davenport — Junior Achievement 1 1 
Wendy Elizabeth Davies — FBLA II, 12; FHA 
11, 12; Junior Achievement II, 12 
Kathi Davis — Young Life 10, 11, 12 
Billy Deal — General Activities 
Mark DeAngelo — Who's Who 11,12 
Mike DeAngelo — General Activities 
Diane DeBobes — Montage staff. French Club 
11, 12 — Sec; Latin Club 10, 11, 12; Science 
Club 11, 12; National Honor Society 11, 12; 
Who's Who 11, 12; S.C.A. 12; Competitive 
Swimming 10, 11, 12 

Elizabeth Christina DeLano — French Club 
10; General Assembly 10, 11, 12; Cross Coun- 
try 10 

Ron A. de Leon — General Activities 
Jill Lorraine Delk — FBLA 1 0, 1 1 ; FHA 10, 11, 









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Maureen Maher peruses the immense wealth of information, tucked neatly away in Kempsville's card 
catalog 



Senior Stats 



Senior Stats/221 



Class Of '84 



12 

John DeSarro — Industrial Arts Club 10. 11; 

VICA 12 

Liesl DeVary —Cheerleaders 10. 11. Who's 

Who 11: Gymnastics 10: Fundraising Chair 

man 12 

Marie Lynn Di Leonardo — General Activities 

Kelly Dillman — FHA 11. 12 — Treasurer 12 

— Virginia Beach Federation — 12 FHA State 
Leadership Conference 11: I.C.C. 11: Junior 
Achievement 1 1: Home Ec. Curriculum Com 
mittee 12 

Chiaki Dills — FHA 12: DEC A 10. 11: Young 
Life 10: Fashion Show 11 
Robert Dimmick — VICA 11. 12: GSCA 
Alexis Dobler — German Club 10: Basketball 

10. 11. 12: Field Hockey 11: Softball 10: Guid 
ance Help 10: Young Life 

Amy Dombrowski — FBLA 12: FHA 11. 12: 

COE 11. 12: Young Life 10. 11. 12 

Carol Donnarumma — FBLA 10. 11 — Trea 

surer 12 — Secretary: Office Help 10: Alon 

tage Staff 12 — Typing Editor 

Laura Donovan — Office Help 10: Young Life 

11. 12 

Karen Downing — Graduation Committee 12 
Serina Dulin — French Club 11: FBLA 12: 
COE 11. 12: Fall Play Lighting Crew: Office 
Help 11; Senior Secret Pal 
Mike Durrand — Spanish Club 10: Key Club 

n 

Jeff Edney — Art Show 10. 11, 12 

Audrey Efily — French Club 10. 11: Class 

Council 10, 11; Spirit Club 10 

Pete Faith — Spanish Club 12; French Club 

1 1 ; Science Club 1 1 ; Video Club 1 2; Art Show 

10. 11, 12; Fall Play; Science Fair 

Albert Fam — VICA 11, 12 

James Fanshaw — VICA 1 1 

Eric Farrer — VICA 11. 12 

Jack Farrer — Industrial Arts Club 11, 12 

Steve Fasanaro — Industrial Arts Club 10. 

DECA 11, 12; Wrestling 10. 1 1 

April Fellers — FHA 10. 11; Art Show 1 1 

Elizabeth Fenton — FHA 12; DECA 12 

Piper Ferguson — FHA 11, 12; DECA 12; 

Gymnastics 11. 12; Office Help 11; Guidance 

Help 10 

Gina Ferrari — VICA 1 1; FHA 1 1; DECA 12 

Jayn Ann Fisher — Spanish Honor Society 1 1 , 

12; Homecoming Float 12; Prom Committee 

1 2; Young Life 1 1 ; Junior Achievement 11. 12; 

Graduation Committee 12; Senior Secret Pal 

Dawn Fitch — Art Show 10; Junior Achieve 

ment 12 

Barbara Flatley — COE 12; Junior Achieve 

ment 10 

Debbie Fleenor —y\Ch 10. II. 12; Cosmetolo 

gy 10. 11, 12 

Paul Flengas — Marching Band 1 1 

Theresa Fletcher — Key Club 1 1 ; ICC. 12 — 

Chairman: National Honor Society 12; Leader 

ship Workshop 11; S C.A 12 — President: 

Homecoming Float 11; City Wide S C.A. 

Theresa Flint — Marching Band 1 1 — Color 

Guard, 12 — Captain; Spanish Honor Society 

Alyssa Flowers — Gymnastics 12; Chorus 12; 

Clinic Help 12; Guidance Help 1 1 

Michael Fojtik — Spanish Club 10; FBLA 12 

— Treasurer; Thespians 10, II; Fall Play 11 
Robert Foley — Basics 10; FHA 1 1; ICC. 12; 
General Assembly 12; Wrestling 10; Chorus 
10, 11, 12; Show Choir 11; Fall Play 10. 11; 
Class Council 12; S.C.A. 12; Clinic Help 1 1. 12. 
Prom Committee 12; Graduation Committee 

12. Homecoming Committee 12; Ring Dance 
Committee 1 I 

Meredith Forbes — Who's Who 12 
Thomas Ford — DECA 12; Football 10, 11 
Wrestling 10, 1 1 




Maribeth Francis — Image Staff 10. II. 12; 

Cheerleaders 11.12; Varsity Club 11. 12; ICC 

12; Gymnastics 10. 11; Young Life 10, 11, 12, 

Campaigners 11, 12 

Stefanie Franklin — FHA 10. DECA 11. 12. 

Fashion Show 11. 12 

Donnie French — Cross Country 10. II. 12; 

Outdoor Track 12 

David Fulgham — VICA 11.12 

Diane Fuss — German Club 12; Senior Secret 

Pal Helper Graduation Committee: Prom Com 

mittee: Ring Dance Committee. Young Life 12 

Jim Fussell — Who's Who 12; Wrestling 10. 

1 1, 12 

Jane Fugua — Thespians 12; Fall Play 10. 11; 

Class Council 12; Leadership Workshop 12. 

S C A 10, 12; Homecoming Chairman 12, Stu 

dent Olympic Chairman 12 

Jo Garrison — Cross Country 10, Softball 10, 

1 1, 12 

Timothy Garza — Musical 12; Art Show 10, 

11, 12, Art Club 10, II, 12 — President 

Charles George — Cross Country 10. 11. 12. 

Indoor Track 10. II. 12; Outdoor Track 10, II. 

12 

Mark Gerasch — VICA 1 1. Industrial Arts 

David Gibbings — German Club 10. 1 1, Indus 

trial Arts Club 10. 11. 12 

Angela Gibson — FBLA 10, II. FHA 11, 12. 

DECA 12 

Tina Gibson — VICA 12; FHA 10, 11, 12 

Timothy Gillen — DECA 10. I 1 

Thomas Glickman — DECA 1 1 , Prom Com 



mittee 12; Graduation Committee 12; Home 
coming Committee 12 

Melissa Gonzaga — Montage Staff 11. 12; 
Spanish Club 12 — Treasurer: French Club 
11 Key Club 11; Science Club 10. II. 12; 
Who s Who 12. Gymnastics 12 — Manager; 
Ledger Star Scholastic Team 10; Office Help 
1 1; Prom Committee 12; Graduation Commit- 
tee 12; Spanish Honor Society 10. 11. 12 
Mary Goodwin — Montage Staff 12; Spanish 
Club 12; Key Club 1 1; Sceince Club 12; Gym- 
nastics 12 — manager; Musical 10; Office 
Help 12; Prom Committee 12. Graduation 
Committee 12; Spanish Honor Society II. 12 
John Grady — Cross Country 12: Outdoor 
Track 1 I 

Amy Gray — Image Stali 10. II. 12 — Copy 
Editor. 7"redfy Staff 10: Malional Merit Scholar 
ship 12; Who s Who 1 1. Spanish Honor Soci 
ety I 1. 12 

Kyle Green — German Club 10. II. 12. Indus 
trial Arts Club 10. 12; Key Club 11. 12. B.imc s 

I I : Science Club 1 1 . 1 2; General Assembly 1 0, 

II 12; Leadership Workshop 12; SCA 10, 
II 12; Young Life 10. 11. 12 

Lisa Greene — FHA 10. II. COE 12 
Robert Greene — DECA 11.12 
Ronald Greene — German Club 10. II — Vice 
Presidenl; Industrial Arts Club II, 12 — Presi- 
dent, Debate 10. I I. I C C II. National Honor 
Society 11.12 

Tern Griffin — General Activities 
Tammy Crisafi — General Activities 



222/Senior Siais 



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Todd Grisom — Thespians 10, 11. 12; Who's 

Who 11 

D'Ann Grumbach — Key Club 11; Forensics 

10; Science Club 10; Thespians 10, 11, 12; 

Video Club 11; Chorus 10. 11, 12; Fall play, 

Musicals 10, 11; Show Choir 12 

David Russel Hager — German Club 10, 11, 

12; Science Club 10, 11; Boys' State 11; Who's 

Who 1 1; Marching Band 10, 11, 12; Orchestra 

10, 11, 12; Fall Play/Musicals 10, 11, 12; Presi- 
dential Classroom 12; Model United Nations 

11, 12; German Foreign Exchange Student 1 1 
Glenn Hagerman — VIC A 12; DECA 10 
Matthew Gregory Hahn — General Activities 
Alesia Hall — Who's Who 12; Marching Band 
10, 11; Fall Play 12; Musical 12 

Lisa J. Hall — ■ Montage siaff 1 1; Spanish Club 

10, 11; Young Life 10, 11, 12 

Michelle Hamilton — COE 11,12 

Doak Harbison — COE 11,12 

Doak Harbison — General Activities 

Dixie Hardison — DECA 11; Who's Who 11; 

Class Olympics 12; DECA Fashion Show 1 1 



Karen Meakins attempts to prove the validity of 
her pass to Mr. Winslow 



Cecilia Haro — Spanish Show 11, 12; Key 
Club 11, 12; Forensics 10, 11, 12; Thespians 

10, 11, 12; General Assembly 12; National 
Merit Scholarship Semi Finalist 12; Fall Play 
/Musicals 10, 11, 12; SCA 12 — Chairman of 
Assemblies; Homecoming dance committee; 
Prom committee 12; Graduation committee 12 
Gary Harris — VICA 12 

Karen Harris — VICA 12 

Kristal Harris — Indoor Track 12; Outdoor 
Track 10. 11, 12 

Judi Lynn Hart — Alonfage staff 10, 12; Span 
ish Club 10, 12; Key Club 10, 12; Basics 12; 
Science Club 10, 12; FBLA 10; Young Life 10; 
Projects Committee 12; Graduation Commit 
tee 12; Spanish Honor Society 10, 12 
Robert L. Haskett — VICA 12; DECA 10 
Timothy W. Hawker — Marching Band 10 
Kathy Lynne Hawthorne — Spanish Club 1 1, 
12; FHA 11; DECA 11; Young Life 10 
Ginger Hayes — Softball 11, 12; Art Show 1 1, 
12 

Lori Lynn Hazzard — FHA 1 1 — Historian/ Re- 
porter 

Rebecca L. Heath — FHA 10, 11, 12; COE 12 
Audrey Helbig — Treafy Staff 12 — Co-editor 
in-chief; ICC 11; President's Club 12 
Brian Henry VII — Musical 10, 1 1 
Lanze Scott Heivy — General Activities 
Hope D Herrit — FHA 10; DECA 12 
Rob Hicks —Varsity Club 11, 12; Football 10, 

11, 12; WeightLifting Club 10, 11, 12 
Walter H Hildebrand — Spanish Club 11; 
VICA 11; Art Show 11, 12 

David Hilton — Varsity Club 10; Who's Who 
12; Basketball 10, 11, 12; Football 10; SCA 10 
Cathleen D Himchak — Alonfage Staff 10, 11, 
12 — Editor; Key Club 10, 11, 12; ICC 12; 
(National Honor Society 11, 12; Soccer 10 — 
Manager; Leadership Workshop 12; Guidance 
Help 11; Special Olympics Volunteer 10, 11, 
12; DAR Citizenship Award Recipient 12 
David Hinds —Latin Club 10, 11; Who's Who 
1 1 

Jeff Hinson — Basics 12 
Annice Hirt — Monfage Staff 1 1; French Club 
12; Marching Band 10, 11; Leadership Work- 
shop 12; SCA 12; Homecoming Parade 12; 
Prom Committee 12; Graduation Committee 
12; Senior Secret Pal; Young Life 10, 11, 12 
LiesI Hock — Chorus 10, 1 1 
Charlie Hodges — Baseball 10, 11, 12 
John Hoeke — French Club 10; German Club 

10, 11, 12; Who's Who 12 

Alex Scott Hoffman — FBLA 10, 11; Varsity 
Club 11, 12; General Assembly 10, 11, 12; 
Baseball 11; Fall Play 10, 11; Young Life 10, 

11, 12; JA 11 

Alarfha Hogge — COE 12; Office Help 11; 

Guidance Help 12 

Kathryn L. Hollingsworth — Treafy Staff 11, 

12; FHA 10, 12; DECA 12; Young Life 10, 11; 

Senior Secret Pals 

Thomas Hopper — Marching Band 10, 11; 

Library Help 11, 12 

Richard Horsch — Image Staff 12 — Photog 



rapher; German Club 10, 11; Industrial Arts 
Club 10, 11, 12; Key Club 11; Thespians 10, 
11, 12; National Honor Society 11, 12; Chorus 
11; Show Choir 11; Fall Play 10, 11, 12; Musi 
cal 10, 11, 12; Leadership Workshop 10, 12; 
Class Historian 12; Harvard Model UN 12; Old 
Dominion Model UN 12 

Susan Leslie Hoskins — Alonfage Staff 11, 12; 
SCA 10; French Club 10; Marching Band 10, 
11, 12; Art Show 10, 1 1, 12 
Robert Stewart Howard — VICA 11, 12 — 
Fundraising 

Cindy Howell — DECA 12; General Assembly 
12; Library Help 12; Young Life 10, 11, 12 
Christine Howell — FHA 10; Chorus 1 1; Fall 
Play 1 1 — Crew 

Craig Hudson — Image staff 11, 12 — Photog- 
rapher, Debate 11, 12; ICC 12; National Honor 
Society 11, 12 — Vice President; Boys' State 
11; Who's Who 11; Musicals 11, 12 — Crew; 
SCA 1 1 — projects chairman; Class Historian 
12 

Julie Anne Hudson — French Club 10, 11; 
FBLA 12; COE 12; Young Life 10, 11; Junior 
Achievement 1 1 — Vice President of Finance; 
Senior Secret pal; French Homecoming Float 
10 

David Hutcheson —DECA 10, 11, 12 
Ken Hunt — FBLA 12; SCA 12 
Debora L Hurvitz — Key Club 1 1 ; Young Life 
10, 11, 12; Campaigners 10, 11, 12; Athletic 
Trainer 1 1 

Lawrence W. I'Anson III — Debate 10; Nation- 
al Honor Society 11, 12; Cross Country 10, 11, 
12; Outdoor Track 10 — Captain, 11; Class 
Officers 10; JETS 11, 12; Spanish Honor Soci- 
ety 11, 12 

Dana Ann Jackson — Chorus 1 1 
Delanea A. Jackson — FHA 11; Art Show 10, 
11 

Lori A. Jackson — Key Club 12; Debate 11, 
12; FBLA 1 1. 12; General Assembly 10, 11, 12; 
SCA 10. 

Jennifer C James — French Club 1 1; Debate 
12; National Merit Scholarship Semifinalist 12; 
Who's Who 12; Fall Play 11 — Crew 
Bill Jennestreet — VICA 12 
Richard Jensen — General Activities 
Teresa Lynn Jensen — FHA 12 
Tracey Richard Joe — Varsity Club 11; Bas- 
ketball 10, 11, 12 

Dana M. Johnson — General Activities 
Karen Johnson — General Activities 
Kimberley Anne Johnston — Spanish Club 
1 1 ; COE 12; General Assembly 1 0; Young Life 
10 

Brenda Diann Jones — Spanish Club 10, 11; 
Key Club 1 1 — Public Relations; Marching 
Band 10 — Flags, 11, 12 — Head Drum major; 
SCA 10, 11; Symphonic Band 10, 11, 12; Ath- 
letic Training 10, 11; Young Life 10, 11, 12; 
Campaigners 10, 1 1 

Clara Mae Jones — FBLA 1 0, 1 1 ; FHA 1 0, 11 ; 
General Assembly 10, 11, 12; Outdoor Track 
10; Clinic Help 12; Homecoming float — FHA 
Donald R. Jones — Industrial Arts Club 11; 
Publicity Committee 12; Wrestling 10 
Glenda M. Jones —FBLA 10, II; FHA 11, 12; 
Fashion Show 1 1 
Ronnie Jones — Spanish Club 10; Key Club 



Senior Stats 



Senior Stats/223 



Class Of '84 



10; FBLA 10. 11; Wrestling 10; Young Life 10. 

11 

Tammy Lee Jones — FHA 10. 1 1 

Michael W. Joseph — General Activities 

Cheryl Gibson Joyner — DEC A 11; COE 12 

Ericka Eve Kammerer — National Honor Soci 

ety 10. 11. 12; Governors School I 1 ; Tidewat 

er Youth Symphony 10, 11. 12; Who's Who 

11; Marching Band 10. 11. 12; Musicals 10. 11. 

12: /.ed/ger Sfar Scholastic Team 10, 11. 12; 

Regional Band 10. 11. 12; Solo & Ensemble 

Festival 10. 11, 12. 

Steven J. Kanter — Science Club 12; Prom 

Committee 12 

Donna Al. Karas — General Activities. 

Michael D Katz — Latin Club 10; S C A. 12; 

Office Help 12; J A II — President 

Thomas P Kaupas — Treafy Staff 12; Varsity 

Club I 1; Basketball 10. II. 12; Outdoor Track 

10, 11, 12. 

Terry Kernodle — FBLA 11. 12; COE 12; J A 

11, 12. 

Candice Michelle Kinard — VICA 10. II. 12; 
S.C.A. 10 

Susan Heather Kirk — Marching Band 10. 11; 
Tennis 12: Musical 10; Regional Band 11 
Willie B Kitchen —Wrestling 10. 11. 12 
Carol Sue Klinefelter — FHA 11; COE 12; 
Library Help 1 1 

Brian D. Koehr — German Club 10. 11; Varsity 
Club 12; General Assembly 1 1; Boys' State 1 1; 
National Honor Society 11. 12 — President: 
Governor's School 1 I ; Cross Country 1 0; Base- 
ball 10; Basketball 10. 11. 12 — Co Captain; 
Leadership workshop 10; i.edger SfarScholas 
tic Team 11, 12: German Honor Society 10, 
11. 12: President's Club 12; Jet's Test 12. 
Barbara L Koeppen — Varsity Club 12; Soc- 
cer 10. 11. 12; National Spanish Honor Society 
10, 11, 12 

Darin Kofroth — DEC A 11. 12; Outdoor Track 
12; Art Show 10; S C A 12; DECA Homecom- 
ing. 

Gregory Jennings Kolcum — Basketball 12; 
Science Club 10, 11 — Treasurer, 12 — Presi- 
dent; National Honor Society 11, 12; Leader- 
ship Workshop 12; Jet's Member 11, 12 
Chris Kreiser — General Activities 
John T Kroll — Spanish Club 10; VICA 11. 
12; DECA 10; Office Help 1 1; Clinic Help 12; 
Soccer 12 

Martha Kubiszewski —FBLA II. 12; COE 12; 
Marching Band 10, 11. 12 
Theresa Labyak — Varsity Club II. l2;Gener 
al Assembly 12: Field Hockey 10, 11. 12; Sen- 
ior Class Officer — Treasurer: Ring Dance 
Committee; Publicity Committee: Variety 
Show 10. 

Aurea Lacson — General Activities 
John L Laine — Key Club II. 12; Who's Who 
11; Marching Band 12; Orchestra 10. 11, 12; 
Chorus 12; All City Orchestra 10, 11. 12; J A 
10. 12 

Kimberly Jo Lakey — Who's Who 12; March- 
ing Band 10. 11, 12; Concert Band 10, II. 12; 
Flag Team II. 12 — Co-captain 
Michael Lambert — General Activities. 
Jack D Landers — VICA 11. 12; Golf 10, 11 
Jack Lane — German Club 10, II 
Trish Anne Langhorne — Industrial Arts Club 
10; FBLA 10; Art Show 11, 12. 
Sabrina Lapp — DECA 12 
Charles E. Lauchner — Industrial Arts Club 
10, 11; VICA 11. 12; Art Show 10. 11. 12 
Kerry Ann Laughlin — Cheerleaders 10. 11, 12 
— Captain: Varsity Club II. 12; ICC II. 
Leadership Workshop 12. President's Club 12; 
Young Life 10. 11; Tri Hi Y 10 
Kathleen Lavandosky — Latin Club 12; Key 
Club 12; Who's Who 11; Guidance Help 12; 



Young Life 12; Homecoming Committee 12. 
Tracey L Lave/y — FBLA 11. 12; Library Help 
10. 

Victoria Lynn Law — VICA 11. 12; FHA 10. 
Laurie Marcell Lawrence — French Club 10, 
11; Key Club 12; Science Club 12; General 
Assembly 11. 12: SCA 11, 12: Office Help 
12; Library Help 10, 11; Tri Hi Y 10: Campaign- 
ers 1 1 ; Young Life 11. 12; Homecoming Com 
mittee 11. 12; Ring Dance Committee 11; 
Prom Committee 12: Publicity Committee 12. 
Melchor "Butch" Lazo — General Activities. 
Matthew Leeds — Spanish Club 10: FHA 12; 
Varsity Club 10. 11. 12: Baseball 11. 12; Foot- 
ball 10, 11. 12 

Brad Lenox — German Club 10. 11; Debate 
10. 11. 12 — Captain; Forensics 10, 12: Na- 
tional Honor Society 11. 12: Governor's School 
1 1 ; Marching Band 10; Ledger Star Scholastic 
Team 10. II. 12; Model UN 10. 11. 12. 
Fred C Lentz — Varsity Club 12; Who s Who 
12: Tennis 10. 11. 12: Leadership Workshop 
12; Senior Class Officer President: Ring Dance 
Committee Chairman II 
Donna Loch — DECA 11, 12; J. A. 12. 
Amy M. Longman — Who's Who 12; March- 
ing Band 10; Concert Band 10 
Mona Rae Lynch — FBLA II. 12; COE 12 
Kelly Ann Lyons — Montage Staff 11; Art 
Show 10. II. 12; Fine Arts Week. Young Life 

10. 11. 12; Campaigners 10. II. 12 
Bruce H Lytle — DECA 12. J A 11 
Andrea Rochelle Mabry — Treaty Staff 10. 1 I 
— Features Editor. 12 — Co Editor — in- 
Chief. Key Club 11. 12. Debate 10. II. 12; 
National Merit Scholarship 12: Fall Play 10. 

11. 12; Young Life 11. 12; J A II — Secre- 
tary 

Dawn Leslie Madison — Spanish Club 10; Key 
Club 12: Science Club 12. LA 12 — Vice- 
President. DECA I 1; ICC 12; General Assem- 
bly 10. II. 12. Marching Band 10; Outdoor 
Track 1 I. 12 

Karen L Manning — V\C A 12; FHA 12; March- 
ing Band 10 

Brenda Lynn Mantta — Library Help 10. 11. 
12; J A 11 

Kathy Ann Marcinko — FBLA 10; FHA 10; 
Who's Who 12. Soccer 10; Young Life 10, 11, 
12; Girl's Weight Lifting 10 
Robert Sean Marsh — Industrial Arts Club 10, 
11, 12 — Vice President: Varsity Club 10. I 1; 
ICC 12: Football 10: Cross Country 10. 11. 
Indoor Track 12; Outdoor Track 10. 11. 12; 
Young life 10, 11. 12 
Debbie Marshall — Latin Club 12 
Janel Martin — Field Hockey 10. II. 12; Soc 
cer 10, II, 12 

Lisa J. Martin — Image Staff 11. 12; General 
Assembly 10; National Honor Society 11. 12; 
Girls' State 12: Who's Who 12, Marching Band 
10, 1 1; Class Council 10, II. 12; SCA 10. 
Fund Raising Senior Class: Prom Committee: 
Ring Dance Committee: Graduation Commit 
tee: Class Olympics 12. Young Life 10; Secret 
Pal 12; Homecoming Float 10. II. 12 
Robert Martin — VICA 12 
Jurell Mason — VIC A 1 2; FHA 1 2; Chorus II; 
Show Choir 12; Clinic Help II 
Brian Matthews — Vo Tech II. 12 
Elizabeth Ellen Matthews — German Club 10. 
11; FHA 10. 11; General Assembly 12; Class 
Council 10. II. 12: SCA 12; Library Help 10. 
11; Ring Dance Committee. Homecoming 
Float 10. II; Young Life 10. II. 12 
Susan IV. Matthews — French Club 10. 11: 
National Honor Society 11. 12; Who's Who 12; 
Junior Class Publicity Chairman. Homecom 
ing Parade Chairman II, Young Life 10, II 
Alan Matyas — Marching Band 10. II. 12; 



Fall Play. Musical 12. 

Alana Mateling — FBLA 10 — Treasurer. 11 

— Regional President. 12 — State President. 

FHA 10: Homecoming Court 1 1. 12; SCA, 12; 

Presidents Club 12, Secret Pal 12. 

William Mau/ —DECA 12; Marching Band 10, 

11. 

Michele Denise Mauney — Science Club 10 

Who's Who 11. 12; Soccer 10; Executive 

Council 12; SCA. 10. 11. 12; SCA. Home 

coming Chairman 1 1; Homecoming Chairman 

10. 12; Young Life 10. 11. 12 
Dale Maurice — Outdoor Track 10; Strategic 
Society 10 

Dana Loise Mayo — French Club 10. 11. 12; 
Key Club 11; FBLA 10; FHA 11. 12 — Vice 
President I.C C 12; Marching Band I I; Tennis 
10; SCA. 10. 11: Class Officer Secretary 10. 
Pattie Melon —DECA 10, 11, 12; Fash Show 
11. 

Damon G McAfee — General Activities 

Robert McAndrews — Cross Country 10, 11, 

12; Outdoor Track 10, It, 12 

Dana McBride — Latin Club II, 12 — V Pres. 

Key Club 11. 12; Science Club 12; ICC 12; 

Who's Who 11. 12 

Lone Lynn McClain — FHA 10. 11. Library 

Help 12 

Wade McClenry — VICA 10. 1 1 

Pam McDaniels — FBLA 1 1. FHA 12; DECA 

1 1 

Duanne McDannell — VICA 1 1. Football 1 1; 

Art Show I I. 

Sheila Renee McGlone — Spanish Club 10; 

DECA 12: Basketball Statistics 10. II 

Heather McPartland — FHA 10; DECA 10, II, 

12; Leadership Workshop II. 12; Fash Show 

1 1. 12 

Chris McLaughlin — VICA 11. 12; Indoor track 

12: Outdoor Track 10, 11, 12 

Tony J. Mercuric — General Activities, 

Horace Jack Miller — Latin Club 10 

Malia Miller —Chorus 10, 11, 12; Fall Play, 

Musical 10, II, 12; Library Help 12 

Steve Miller — VICA 12 

Brian S Milliken — Varsity Club 12; Who's 

Who 12; Indoor Track 12; Outdoor Track 10, 

11, 12 

Karen Mitchell — Marching Band 1 0. 1 I . Oli ver 

Becky Ann Mohap — Varsity Club II, 12 — 

Secretary. National Honor Society 11. 12. 

Who's Who II. 12; Gymnastics 10. 12. Guid 

ance Help I 1. Young Life 10. II. 12. Athletic 

Training I 1 

John Moore — General Activities 

Mark S Moore — VICA 12; Vo tech — 1 1 

IV. Grant Moosha Jr. — Football 10. 1 1 

Julie Morgan — Spanish Club 10; FBLA 12; 

COE 12: Office Help 10 

T J Morgan —Latin Club 10; Varsity Club 10, 

11. 12: Boys' State II; Football 10. II, 12; 

Outdoor Track 10, II. 12 Fashion Show 11; 

Weightlifting 10. I I 

Brian Keith Morris — Industrial Arts Club I 1; 

National Honor Society 11. 12; Young Life 1 1, 

12; Spanish National Honor Society 10, II. 12, 

Michael Scott Morris —Varsity Club II, 12 — 

Pres : Baseball 10, II, 12, — CoCapt; S.C.A.; 

Young Life 10. II. 12. Presidents Club. Foot 

ball 10. II. 12 — CoCapt 

Rodney Morrison — VICA II. 12. Fall Play 10 

Joyce Lynn Motley — Art Show; J A . Special 

Olympics 

Kan D Motley — Spanish Club 10. Latin Club 

II. Ind Arts Club II. FHA II. DECA 12; 

Young Life 10 

Kathleen Mueller — Science Club 12. March 

ing Band 10, II — Rifle — Flag; SCA 12; 

Boy's Basketball Statistician 

William R Muse Jr — VICA. FHA. Marching 



224/Senior Stats 




Band; Wrestling 

Brad Machman — Montage Staff 11. 12 — Co 
Editor; Spanish Club 11, 12; Latin Club 10; 
Who's Who 

Michele Ann Naujoks — French Club 10. 
Lewis R Newby Jr. — ICC. 12; Video Club 
11. 12 — Vice Pres.; Marching Band 10; Cho 
rus 11; Fall Play Musicals 10. 11. 12. 
/V/co/e W/ce/y —S.C. A. 1 1; Athletic Trainer 12 
Stephen H. Nichael — Latin Club 10. 11. 12; 
Debate 10. I 1; Who's Who 12; Library Help 10; 
Prom Comm.; Graduation Comm.: Homecom- 
ing Comm 

Leia Nixon — General Activities 
Joe Octavo — VICA 11, 12; Office Help 12; 
VoTech 11. 12 — Rep 
Barry Odom — Art Show 10. 1 1 
Thomas Oliver —VICA 11, 12; CDC 11, 12 
Robin Denise Olmstead — Marching Band 10, 
11, 12; Class Council 10, 11, 12; S.C.A. 10, 1 1, 
12; Comm. Chairman. Presidents Club 12; 
Band 12 — Pres.; Concert Band; Prom Comm.; 
Graduation Comm. 

Lome ONeal — FBLA 12; FHA 10; DECA 
12; 

Coe 12; S.C.A 10. 11; Library Help 11; Guid- 
ance Help 10 

Ashley Lynn Onks — Science Club 12; FBLA 
12; Fall Play — Musicals 11. 12; Leadership 
Workshop 12; S C A. 12; Prom Comm ; Public- 
ity Com. 10. 11. 12; Homecoming Comm. 10, 
11, 12 

Teresita Ortega — Image Staff 10, 11, 12 — 
Co-Editor; ICC 12; National Honor Society 
11, 12; Girls' State 1 1; Who's Who 12; Senior 
Secret Pal 12; Class officer — Tres. 10, 11; 
Guidance Help 11, 12; Graduation Comm 12; 
Homecorning Comm 12, Ring Dance Comm 
1 1; Presidents Club 12 

Nancy Van den Ouweelen — Field Hockey 1 1 , 
12; Outdoor Track 11.12 
Herbert E Overton — VICA 11, 12 — Pres & 
Tres ; Tidewater Youth Symphony 10; March- 
ing Band 10, 11 

Nancy Pacifico — FBLA 10; FHA 10, \\, 12 
— Secretary; VoTech 

Charlene Linae Pallet! — Treaty Staff 10, 11, 
12 — Managing Editor; Thespians 12; ICC 
11; Video Club 12 — School Rep — Secre 
tary; Musicals 12; SCA 12; Homecoming 
Comm 



Frank Panzarella — DECA 12; Marching Band 

10, 11, 12 

Pamela J Pappus — General Activities 

Melody Paragus — French Club 10. 11, 12; 

Key Club 11, 12; Science Club 11, 12 

Billy Park — General Activities 

Robert L. Parrish Jr. — Treaty Staff 11. 12; 

Key Club 1 1; National Spanish Honor Society 

1 1. 12 

Eric S. Patterson — VICA 11. 12; Marching 

Band Fall Play 10, 11 — Stage Crew; VoTech 

11, 12 

David C Pensyl — Key Club 1 1 ; Varsity Club 
10; National Honor Society 11, 12; Who's Who 
11; Football 10; Outdoor Track 10; Wrestling 
10; Soccer 10 

Jeffrey Permenter — ICA 11, 12 — Vice Pres. 
Ashlie Perrotta — DECA; Art Show 11, 12; 
Young Life; Basketball Mgr. Tri-HiY 10. 
Steven Wayne Peters — Varsity Club 11, 12; 
Football 10, 11, 12; Young Life 10, 11, 12; 
Campaigners 1 1 , 12; Weight I if ting Club 10, 11, 
12. 

Teresa A. Pettruny — Key Club 1 1; Library 
Help 10, 11, 12; Spanish Honor Society 11, 12; 
J. A. 10; Young Life 12 
George M. Phelps Jr. — German Club 10, 
— historian, 12 — Vice pres.; S.C.A. 10, 
Mark Phelps — Basketball 12 
Stacy Lang Pierce — French Club 10, 
Office Help 11; Graduation Co-Chairman 
Cindy Piver — Chorus 10, II, 12; Show Choir 
12; Musical 12; Office Help 1 1 
Mike Pitts — Art Show 10, 11; J. A. 10, 1 1 
Karen Pocock — Key Club 11, 12 — Publicity 
Comm. Chairman; Varsity Club 12; National 
Honor Society 12; Outdoor Track 12; Gymnas- 
tics 10, 11, 12; Spanish Honor Society 11. 12; 
Young Life 11, 12; Credentials Comm. Chair- 
man 

Kathryn Pocock — Key Club 11, 12 — Secre 
tary. Varsity Club 12; National Honor Society 
11, 12; Gymnastics 11, 12; Leadership Work 
shop 12; Spanish Honor Society 11, 12; Young 
Life 12. 

Tammy Ponder — Key Club 11, 12; Varsity 
Club 12; Basketball 11, 12; Tennis 10. 11. 12; 
Library Help 1 1 

JoAnne Helene Pontillo — French Club 12 — 
Pres ; Key Club 11. 12; Science Club 12; Gen 
eral Assembly 11. 12; President's Club 12; 



11 
11 



11; 



Jo Anne Pontillo uses her spare time to catch 
up on homework. 



Young Life 10, II, I/'; ( ^mpaignfrs II. 12 
Lisa M. Popperwill — Outdoor Track 10; Soc- 
cer 1 1 — Manager; Office Help 1 1; Guidance 
Help 10 

Ernest Porter — General Activities 
Robert Potts — Industrial Arts Club 12 
Karen Powell — Field Hockey 10, 11; Softball 
10, 1 1; Guidance Help 10 
Tiffany Primm — DECA 12; Varsity Club 10; 
Field Hockey 10. 11, 12; Outdoor Track 10. 
11; Tidewater Youth Symphony 10 
Michael Prince —FBLA 10; SCA Photogra 
pher 12 

Brian Proctor — VICA 11,12 
Glenn Quiban — General Activities 
Brenda Rabidoux — Cheerleader 10, 11, 12 — 
Captain; FHA 11; Varsity Club 10. 11. 12; 
Who's Who 1 1 ; Homecoming Court 10. II, 12 
Donna Marie Raleigh — Guidance Help 12 
Steven Ralph — Tidewater Youth Symphony 
10, 11; Orchestra 10, 11, 12 
Troy D. Ramsey — FHA 12; Varsity Club 1 1, 
12; Football 10, 11, 12; Young Life 10, I 1, 12 
Katherine D. Randolph — General Activities 
Suzanne Rapcavage — Cheerleaders 10, 11, 
1 2; DECA 1 1 ; Varsity Club 12; Gymnastics 1 0, 
12; Guidance Help 10. 11. 
Michelle A. Ravizza — Latin Club 12; Guid- 
ance Help 11. 12; Young Life 11, 12; Cam 
paigners 1 1 

Cathy A. Ray — FBLA 11, 12; FHA 10, 1 1 
Chris Rega — Tennis 10, 11. 12; Soccer 10. 
11 

Carol Rettie — French Club 10, 11; FBLA 10. 
12; FHA 12; Office Help 12; Young Life 10. 11. 
12 

Jud Rhode — 10. 11, 12 — Captain 
Dan Rhodes — DECA 12; Who's Who 12; 
Basketball 10, 11, 12 — Captain 
Donald Rhodes —DECA 12; Football 10, 11, 
12 — Captain; Wrestling 10, 11; Weightlifting 
10, 11 

Linda Richardson — FBLA 10, 11, 12; Thespi- 
ans 10; Fall Play/Musicals 
Timothy Riddle — VICA 10, 11; NHRA; NEA 
Parrish Riley — French Club 10; Debate 10, 
1 1, 12; FBLA 11; Thespians 10, 11. 12 — Vice 
Pres.; I.C.C. 12; Who's Who 11. 12; Fall Play- 
/Musicals 10. 11. 12 — Student Director; 
S.C.A. 1 1; Model U.N. 10. 11. 12 
Carolyn Ritter — Marching Band 10. 1 1 
Joseph F. Rivera — Spanish Club 12; Industri- 
al Arts Club 10; Tennis 12; Art Show 10, 11, 
12 

James Roberts — Industrial Arts Club 12; Out- 
door Track 10, 11, 12 
Beth L Robertson — General Activities 
Glenn Robertson — General Activities 
Jeffrey Scott Rogers — Marching Band 10, 11, 
12; Orchestra 10, 11, 12; Fall Play/Musicals 

10, 11; Senior Regional Band 12; Solo & En 
semble Festival 10, II, 12. 

Jessica Rogers — Outdoor Track 10, 11, Fall 

Play, Musicals 10, 1 1 

Tim Rogers — Science Club 1 1 

Tonya Rene Robinette — FBLA 10; FHA 10, 

1 1; DECA 10, 11, 12 

Curtis Allen Robinson — Young Life 12 

Wendy Anne Rodgers — French Club 10; FHA 

1 1; DECA 12; Young Life 10, 11; Campaigners 

1 1. 

Regina Marie Rossi — Thespians 10, 11, 12; 

ICC 11, 12; Chorus 10, 1 1. 12; Show Choir 10, 

11, 12 — president; Fall Play and Musicals 1 0, 



Senior Stats 



Senior Stats/225 






Class Of '84 



11. 12 — leading roles; SCA 10, 11. 12 — 
representative; Office Help 12; Spirit Week 
Chairperson: Variety Shows 10. 11, 12 — di- 
rector 

Jeffrey Thomas Rouse — Debate 12; Foren- 
sics 10; National Honor Society 11, 12; March- 
ing Band 10, 11; Ledger Star Scholastic Team 
10 

Stacey Lynn Rudiger — FBLA 11. 12; FHA 1 1 ; 
COE 12; Chorus 10 

Katherine Rushing — French Club 10; March- 
ing Band 10, 11. 12; Leadership Workshop 12; 
Guidance Help 12; Musical 10; Fal Play 10 
Al Russell — VICA 12 

Daniel Franklin Rustchak II — Latin Club 10; 
FBLA 11 

Mary Katherine Rutt — Thespians 12; Who's 
Who 12; Chorus 10. II — Vice President; 
Show Choir 12; Fall Play and Musical 10, 11, 
12; SCA 10, 11 — Vice president 
Paula Salmons — FBLA 10, 1 1 
Kevin Dwayne Sanford — General Activities 
Nancy O. SantaMaria — Key Club 1 1; LA 12; 
Business Dept. assistant 12 
Mike Satchwell — VICA 11, 12; Marching 
Band 10, 11 

Thomas F. Savala — Fire Dept. /Rescue 
Squad 11, 12 

Steven Sekeres III — Industrial Arts Club 10, 
11, 12 — treasurer; Young Life 10, 11; Who's 
Who 12 

Mary Ann Scaglione — FHA 12; DECA 11; 
Varsity Club 10, 11. 12; Field Hockey 10. 11, 
12; Outdoor Track 10, II; Homecoming Court 
11; Young Life 10. 11. 12 
Peter Schenck — Art Show II. 12 
Joan Scherrer — Treaty staff 
Tracey S. Scott — Forensics 10. 11, 12; FHA 
11; Who's Who II; Chorus 10; Show Choir 12; 
SCA 10; Office Help 12 

Virginia May Scott — Marching Band 10, 11; 
Tennis 12 

Leslie Shapiro — French Club 10; Latin Club 
12: Key Club I 1; Debate 10. II, 12; Forensics 
12; Who's Who; Class Council 12; Senior Se- 
cret Pal, Executive Officer 12; Superdance 10, 
11 

Barrie T. Sharf — FHA 11,12 
Kristin Sharp — Spanish Club II; Variety 
Show I 1; Tension Night 1 I 
Suzy Sharp — DECA 12 
Brad Shaw — Image Staff II. 12 — business 
manager; Key Club II. 12 — vice-president; 
ICC 10. II. 12; Boys' State II; Leadership 
Work Shop I I; Junior class vice-president 
Lamont Shelton — General Activities 
Gregg Shimandle — VICA 12 
David n. Simmons — VICA 12. 
Lisa A. Simons — FBLA 10; FHA 12; DECA 
II; Spanish Honor Society 11, 12; Basketball 
Statistician 10. II; Fashion Show II. 12 
Frank Sink — FHA 12; Thespians 10, II; Golf 

10, 12; Basketball 10, II; Baseball 10; Cross 
Country 10; Office Help I I 

Mike Sinsabaugh — Junior Achievement 12 

Michelle Skelenger — German Club 10; Cross 

Country II; Library Help II; Young Life 10, 

11; Junior Achievement 12 

Stephen John Skrapits III — Spanish Club 10. 

II; Chorus 10, II — president, 12; Show 

Choir 10, I I. 12; Fall Play and Musicals 10, II, 

12 

Karen Slagle — Montage staff 1 1 ; Fall Play 

and Musicals — concessions 

Susan Slaughter — French Club 10; Latin 

Club 10. II. 12; ICC 10, II; National Honor 

Society II. 12 — secretary; Who's Who 10. 

11, 12; Field Hockey 10, 1 I ; Tennis 12; Soccer 
10; Class Council 10, II, 12; Leadership Work 
shop 10, II; Homecoming Court 12: class sec 



retary 10. 11; Office Help 12; Senior Secret 
Pal-chairperson 

Christopher M. Smith — General Activities 
Debbie S. Smith — Alonfage staff 12 — layout 
editor; VICA 11. 12; Art Show 10. 11. 12 
Jonathan O. Smith — SCA 12 
Tracy E. Smith — Science Club 10, 11; FBLA 
10, 12; FHA 12; Thespians 11. 12; SCA 10 
Bobby Snukis — General Activities 
Denise Sokolinsky — Who's Who 1 1; Soccer 
10. 11. 12 

Mark -Duck' Sokolinsky — FHA 12; Wres- 
tling 10, 11, 12; Soccer 11, 12 — captain 
Jared E. Spain — Football 10 
William R. Speelman — FBLA 11; Junior 
Achievement II; Young Life 12 
Tammy L. Speight — Spanish Club 10. 11 — 
vice-president, 12 — president; Mori rage staff 
1 1 ; Forensics 11, 12; Thespians 1 0; ICC 10, 11, 
12; General Assembly 10; Chorus I 1; Fall Play 
and Musicals 10. II; Variety Show 10; Home 
coming committee 10, 11, 12; National Span 
ish Honor Society 10, 11, 12 
Bruce Spiva — Debate 10, 11, 12 — captain; 
Forensice 10, II, 12; Thespians 10, 11. 12 — 
chairman; Who's Who 11. 12; Show Choir 11. 
12; Fall Play and Musicals 10. 11, 12 — lead- 
ing roles; Leadership Workshop 1 1; SCA 1 1 — 
president; Sophomore class president; Model 
UN 10, 11, 12 

Jodi Marie Springer — FHA 1 1 ; General As- 
sembly 12; Office Help 10. 11; Young Life 10, 
11 

Lisa Ann Spruill — Image Staff 10, 11, 12; 
French Club II, 12 — treasurer; Indoor Track 
12; Outdoor Track I 1; SCA 10, 11, 12; Home- 
coming chairperson 12; Campaigners 10, II; 
12; Young Life 10, II, 12; Class Olympics 12; 
Graduation Committee 12; senior Secret Pal 
Kevin W. Squires — FBLA 1 0; COE 1 1 
Grantland Staff — Montage staff 10, 11 — 
reading staff eidot; French Club 10, II; Foren- 
sics 10; Football II; Class Council 10. 11. 12; 
Ledger Star Scholastic Team 10; Young Life 
10, 11, 12; National Merit Scholarship Semi- 
finalist 1 1 

Henry W. Stafford, Jr. — General Activities 
Laura Ellen Stanulis — Montage staff I I ; Art 
Show 10. II. 12; Musicals II. 12; Guidance 
Help 11. 

Anita Louise Staton —FHA 12; Chorus 10. 1 1 
John R Stemple — General Activites 
Andrea Stepnick — Spanish Club 10; Thespi 
ans 10. II. 12; Who's Who 12; Marching Band 
10, II; Orchestra 10. II; Fall Play and Musi 
cals 10, II. 12; SCA 12; Library Help 1 I; Ring 
Dance Committee II; Prom Committee 12; 
Senior Secret Pal; Homecoming Committee 

10, 11, 12; Spanish Honor Society 10 
Sharon Stewart — German Club 11. 12; ICC 

11, 12; General Assembly 11, 12; SCA II. 12; 
Office Help II; Homecoming Committee II; 
Superdance II; Student Trainer II. 12 
Kevin M. Stone — Art Show I I 
Raymond Stone — FBLA 10; Soccer 10. II. 
12 

Cheryl Strange — Thespians 12; Chorus 10; 
Show Choir II, 12; Musicals 10. II; Fall Play 
12; Regional Chorus 10, 12. Variety Show 10. 
1 I. Tension Nighl 10. I I 
Diana Strickland — French Club 1 I. 12 
"Messy" Marvin Strickland — Outdoor Track 
II. 12; Wrestling 10; Chorus II. 12 
Eric IV. Stroup —German Club 10. II. Debate 
10, II, 12; General Assembly 10; Fall Play and 
Musicals 10, 12; Class Council 10, II, 12; 
Model United Nations 12; Strategic Society 10 
James A. Stubblefield — Latin Club 10. II, 
12; Science Club 10; Thespians I I. 12; Musi 
cals 10. I I. 12 



Doreen Elizabeth Sullivan — Cheerleaders 10 

II. 12; FHA II; Varsity Club 10. II. 12; ICC 

10; Leadership Workshop 12; Homecomini 

Court 10; Guidance Help 1 1; Class Council 10 

Tri-Hi-Y 10; Young Life 10. II. 12 

Deborah J. Sumner — FBLA II. 12; Vo Ted 

11. 12 

P. Brandon Sutherland — Baseball 10, 12 

Ocean View Aces 10 

Jim Sutton III — Key Club I I; Homecomint 

Committee 1 1 

Ingrid L. Svedtierg — Key Club I I; DECA 12 

Marching Band 10. II; Fashion Show 11 

Cynthia Ann Swain — Key Club 12; FBLA 12 

Library Help 10; Homecoming Committee 10 

12; Senior Secret Pal 

Howard Swartz — Tennis 10, II. 12 

Merlin Swartzentrut>er — German Club 10 

Latin Club I 1; FBLA 12; Varsity Club 1 1. 12 

Who's Who II. 12; Football 10. II. 12; Out 

door Track 12; Wrestling 10. II. 12; SCA 12 

Jeff Swyers — Clinic Help 12 

Jeff Sykes — General Assembly 12; Footbal 

10. II; Young Life II. 12; Weight Lifting Clul 

10. II 

Jerry Taylor — FBLA II. 12; Fall Play anc 

Musicals 10. II. 12 

Mort Tann — SCA 12 — representative 

Debra Gayle Tate — French Club 10. II. 12 

Latin Club 10. II. 12; Key Club II. 12; Sci 

ence Club II. 12 — vice president: ICC 12; 

National Honor Society 12: Who's Who 12; 

Gymnastics 10; Prom Commltee chairperson 

12; Neptune Princess 12 

Eric Taylor — Spanish Club 10. II; Science 

Club 10. II; Who's Who II: Marching Banc 

10. II. 12; Musicals 10. 12; Drum Captain U 

Rob Tennis — General Activities 

Denise M. Tew — Marching Band 10. II. 12 

Junior Achievement 12 

Lori Lee Thomas — Spanish Club 10, II 

FBLA II. 12; FHA 11, 12 

Sean Thomas — General Activities 

Matthew J. Thompson — Image siaff 10, I 1 

12 — editor: Key Club II. 12 — president: ICC 

10, 12: National Honor Society II. 12; Footbal 

10. II. 12; Leadership Workshop 10; sopho 
more class vice-president; junior class presi 
dent; Special Olympics 12; Senior Secret Pa 
Mark A. Thompson — Industrial Arts Club 10 

11. 12 

Allan G Todd — free lance photographer 

Todd C Thompson — Science Club I 1 ; Cross 

Country 11; Outdoor Track II 

Dana Toxey — VICA 12; 

Elizabeth Tilt — Leadership Workshop 12 

Publicity Committee Chairperson 12 

Joseph S. Tinkler — Varsity Club II. 12; 

Baseball 10. II. 12; Football 10. II. 12; Younc 

Life 10. II, 12 

Valerie Todesco — DECA 12; ICC. 12; Cho 

rus 10; Show Choir II, 12 — Vice President; 

Art Show 11. 12: Regional Chorus 10. 12; 

Fashion Show II. 12; Young Life 10. I I 

Joe Trail — General Activities 

Mathew Courtney Trueblood — Marching 

Band — 10. II. 12 — President 

Gerald Turner — General Activities 

Peggie Leigh Turner — German Club 10. II 

— President. 12 — Secretary: Science Club! 

II. 12 — Secretary: FHA I 1; National Honor 

Society II. 12; Who's Who II. 12; Jets Team 

II. 12; Senior Secret Pal 12 

Eileen (Jrmann — Spanish Club 10. 11; Key 

Club I 1; Who's Who I 1; Prom Chairman 12; 

Spanish Honor Society 10, II, 12 

Sharon Kay Utter — Montage staff. 

Shirley Ann Otter — General Activities 

Jennifer Christine Valade — French Club 12; 

Basics 12 — Vice President. Ck, uiu.ition Com' 



226/ Senior Slats 



STTd 




mittee 12 

Timothy Van Fossen — VICA 1 1 
4nn H Walker — DECA 12; Fall Play, Musical 
10 — Crew; Art Show 10; Office Help 10; 
Young Life 10, 11, 12; Ring Dance Committee 
I 1 

Anna Maria Walker — FHAIO, 11; DECA 12 
David L. Walker — Image 1 2; Treaty 1 1 ; Tfies- 
pians 10. 11, 12; General Assembly 10; Who's 
Who 11, 12; Fall Play, Musicals 10, 11, 12. 
Donald Walker — Fall Play; Musicals 11, 12; 
Junior Achievement 1 1 

Mary Grant Walker — French Club 10; Young 
Life 10, 11; TriHi Y 10 
Mike Walker — General Activities 
Seanne Walker — FHA 11; Junior Achieve- 
ment 1 1 

Chris Walsh — Soccer 10; Library Help 10; 
Banzai Skate Team 11, 12; National Jr. Honor 
Society 10; Video Club 10 
Sean Walsh — Video Club 10; Art Show 10, 
Library Help 10 

Susan Hall Walton — Varsity Club 11, 12; 
Who's Who 12; Basketball 10, 11, 12 — Cap 
tain; Field Hockey 10, 11, 12 — Captain, Soc 
cer 10. 11. 12. S.C.A., Representative 11, 12; 
Young Life 10, 11, 12; Campaigners 11. 12 
Bill Waltz — Banzai Skate Team 11,12 
Kathleen Wanzong — Montage 12; Key Club 
11; Basics 12; FBLAIO, 11; National Honor 
Society II, 12; Girls' State 1 2; Who's Who 1 1 , 
12; Marching Band 10. 11. 12 — Treasurer; 
Fall Play, Musicals 12; Symphonic Band 10, 
11, 12, Junior Achievement 11 
Ken Ward — Spanish Club 12; French Club 
10, 11; Wrestling 1 1 

Robert "Troy" Ward — General Activities 
William M/ard —German Club 10, II, 12; Key 
Club 1 1; Debate 12; Forensics 10, 11; National 
Merit Scholarship Commendation 12; Who's 
Who 12; Outdoor Track 10. Manager; Library 
Help 11; Foreign Exchange 11 
Kim Warner — Industrial Arts Club 10; FBLA 
10; FHA 11, 12; Art Show 10 
Julie Warshaw — Treaty 11, 12; French Club 
10; FBLA 12; Outdoor Track 11; Soccer 10; 
Girls Chorus 1 1 ; Fall Play 1 1 ; Weight Lifting 1 I 
Debra R Washington — Spanish Club 10, 11, 
12; VICA 11; General Assembly 10; Who's 
Who 12; Library Help 10 
Deborah A Waskey — FBLA 12; FHA 10, 11; 
DECA 10; COE 12 

Kimberly Lynn Watkins — Basics 11, 12 — 
Treasurer; ICC 12; Marching Band 10, 11, 12 
Rani Lee Watkins — Latin Club 11; Who's 



Who 11, 12; Softball 11; Chorus 10. 11 
Matthew C. Watson — Montage. 12; Marching 
Band 10, II, 12 — Brass Captain; Soccer 10; 
Fall Play, Musicals 12; Ring Dance Committee 
1 1; Float Committee 10, 1 1 
Mitchell Weatherford — General Activities 
Laurie Ann Webber — Spanish Club 10; Gen- 
eral Activities 11, 12; Chorus 10 
Jerry Welch — Treaty 1 1; Key Club 1 1; Soc- 
cer 11, 12; Junior Achievement 11 
Danny Wells — French Club 10 
Mark Anthony Wells — Art Show I 1 
Adam Heath Wesberry — FBLA 12; SCA 12; 
Surf Club 10, 11, 12; Junior Achievement 11; 
Fashion Show 1 1 

Brett West —Golf 10, 11, 12 — Captain 
Carrie L. West — Varsity Club 11, 12 — Trea- 
surer; General Assembly 10, 11; National Hon- 
or Soceity 11, 12; Girls' State 1 1 — Alternate; 
Gymnastics 10, 11 — co-captain 12; Soccer 
10. 11. 12; Homecoming Court 11, 12 — 
Queen; SCA 1 1; Office Help 12; Homecoming 
Committee Alumni Chairman 12; Senior Se- 
cret Pal 12; Young Life 10, II; Campaigners 

10, 1 1, 12 

Robin West — FBLA 11, 12; FHA 12; Fall 
Play, Musicals 1 1 

Mike Whalen — General Activities 
William H IV/i/nery — Thespians 10, 11, 12; 
Chorus 10; Show Choir 11. 12; Fall Play. Musi- 
cals 10, 11. 12 

Craig Whitehurst —Wrestling 10, 11 
Margaret M. Whitney — German Club 12; Fall 
Play, Musicals 11; SAC. Helper 12 
Sandy Whittaker — French Club 12; Basics 12 

— Secretary; Marching Band 11. 12; SCA 10; 
Guidance Help 12 

Peter M. Widel — Industrial Arts Club 10. 11, 
12; FHA 12; Young Life 10, 11, 12; Fashion 
Club 11, 12 

Mark Widener — Indoor Track 12; Tennis 12 
Michael Wiersch — German Club 10, 11, 12 

— President; Debate 10, 11; Science Club 10. 

11. 12 — Treasurer; Varsity Club 11; General 
Assembly 10. 11; National Honor Society 11, 
1 2; Cross Country 10, 11, 12; Indoor Track 1 1 , 
12; Outdoor Track 10. 11; Leadership Work- 
shop 11; SCA 10, 11; Teacher Aid 11, 12 
Jeff Williams — Football 10. 1 1 

James Wilson — Wrestling 10, 11 

Susan K Wilson — Library Help 10 

Duane Wingrove — Wrestling 10 

Shell Rae Workman — LA 12; FHA 10, 11. 

COE 12 

Kristine Alicia Worrell — FBLA 10, 11 — 



Mike Boudell Indulges in the finer things of life 
with his delicious doughnut sold by the Treaty 
staff. 



Secretary; Thespians 11, 12; ICC. II; Fall 
Play 12; Musical 1 1; Crew 10; FBLA Summer 
Workshop; SCA TV. Committee 11; Senior 
Class Secretary; Publicity Chairman Jr. Class 
11; Homecoming Committee 10, 11, 12; Ring 
Dance Committee 11; Prom Committee 12; 
Spanish Honor Society 10, 11, 12 
Angelia F. Worth —FBLA 10; FHA 10. 1 1. 12; 
DECA 1 1; Young Life 10. 11. 12 
Cynthia Lee Wright — Spanish Club 10. 11. 
12; Debate 10; Forensics 10, 11. 12; FBLA 12; 
National Honor Society 12; Governor's School; 
National Merit Scholarship. Who's Who; Fall 
Play. Musicals 10. 1 1 

Dana Marie Wright — U.S.S. Swimming 10. 
11; Young Life 11 

Scott W. Wucher — VICA 11. 12; Vo-Tech 
Plumbing Association 11, 12 
Christine E. Wunderly — Varsity Club 12; Na- 
tional Honor Society 11, 12; Who's Who 11; 
Softball 10, 11. 12; Spanish Honor Society 11, 
12 

Courtney Lane Zierden — Cheerleader 10, 11, 
12 — Secretary; Varsity Club 10. 11. 12 — 
Chairman; l.C.C; General Assembly 10. 11; 
Who's Who 12; Class Council 10. 11, 12; Lead- 
ership Workshop 10. 12; Homecoming Court 
12; SCA 10, 11, 12 — Treasurer; Young Life 
10, 11, 12; Campaigners 11, 12; Tri Hi Y 10 
Kim Marie Zmarthie — Latin Club 11, 12; 
Who's Who II 
David Vincent Zyzak — General Activities 






JA^C'- 



l» 






v 



^^<^<c - 






y^t^ 



yr^^^ 



Senior Stats 



Senior Stats/227 



Image Index 



AAaa 



160 



ABELE WILLIAM R 58 

ABSHIRE SCOTT LESLIE 58. 154 

ADAMS MICHAEL DAVID 94. 137. 

ADAMS TERESA LYNN 58 

ADCOCK KATHLYN INGRID 94. 155 

ADKINS ANGELA LYNN 13. 58. 154. 155 

ADKINS III JAMES MILLER 94. 154 

AGBtJYA PAMELA G 116. 139. 154. 161 

AGGAS CHRISTINE MARIE 58. 154 

AINSCOUGH ALLISON ANN 116. 151 

AINSCOtIGH DAVID GEORGE 94 

AKERS IV ARTHUR REED 163. 178 

AKEY NORMAN DEE 116 

ALBERT TIM 48. 154. 170. 171. 188 

ALEXANDER CRAIG STEPHEN 58 

ALFRED ROBERT DANNY 94 

ALLEN JUDY 35. 48 

ALLEN KENT LANE LANE 94 

ALLEN KERRY LEE 94 

ALLEN VALERIE REBECCA 1 16 

ALLISON WILLIAM STUART 58 

ALTMAN AMY DAWN 58 

AMATO GINA CARMELA 149 

AMBER KIMBERLY ANN 116 

AMOS RICHARD FAW 116 

ANDERSON ANDREA GAYLE 94. 155 

ANDERSON LISA DENISE 94 

ANDERSON MICHAEL STEVEN 58. 90 

ANDES HEATH DARYL 94 

ANNET ELIZABETH D 58. 1 16. 185 

ANNET RODERICK D 6. 58. 89. 137. 43 

ANTONIO ROBERT LOPEZ 1 16 

AQUILIZAN FE TOLENTINO 94. 151 

ARCHBELL SHARON 48 

ARMOUR BOBBY 176 

ARMOND YVONNE MARIE 58 

ARMOUR MICHAEL NORBERT 116. 137 

ARNOLD AMY CONWAY 58. 154. 155 

ARNOLD SHANE 1 16. 187 

AROMIN FAY ANN ROQUIZ 58. 61. 137 

ARTRIP GANNA MARIA 1 16 

ARZADON CHRISTINE 94. 176. 

ASHLEY DEBBIE 176 

ASHLEY DONNA MARIE 94 

ASHMORE STEVEN 94 

ATHERTON AMY RAE 94. 151 

ATKINS THERESA ELLEN 116 

AUER KIMBERLY AMES 58 

AUSTIN ANDREW STONE 94 

AUSTIN BRIAN PEDEN 116 

AUSTIN NATHAN MATTHEW 116. 

AYCOCK THOMAS WARREN 94 

AZAR SUZANNE JOAN 116 



185 



189 



BBbb 



BACHMAN TRACY JOKLl L 5tt 

BAIG FAR AH 95. 160 

BAILEY CHEERI ANNETTE 59. 176, 182 

BAILEY DAWN MARIE 116. 151 

BAILEY DEBORAH ANN 59. 154 

BAILEY NATHANIEL JAMES 116 

BAILEY Wll I.IAM ERIC 36 

BAINE PARKER 48 

BAIOCCO MARYANN JEAN 116. 137, 144. 161 

BAIOCCO MICHAEL PETER 95. 144 

BAKER ANTHONY M 59. 155 

BAKER CYNTHIA 48 

BAKER HEATHER LEIGH 95. 138. 139. 161 

BAKER KAREN 1 YNN I 16 

BALL ANDREA MANNING 95 

BALLANCE WILLIAM RAY 95 

BALMACEDA JOHN CHRISOPH 95. 145. 160 

BALSLEY LEANNA M 116 

BANNEVICH STEPHANIE ANNE 14. 164 

BANNISTER JOHN JOSEPH 116. 187 

BARBOO I AURA LOUISE I 16 

BARCLIFT KARA ELIZABETH 21. 95 

BARGf R JOHN PRESTON 95. 154 

BARHAM DANIEL FRANCIS 116 

BARIAl DARNAY TERRELL 95 

BARKER TARA Ml 1 LN I 16, 145 

BARKETT CATHKRINF MARIE 95. 161 

BARKLEY TEEGAY 48 



BARNARD CHRISTIAN LEE 1 16 

BARNES CLIFFORD ALLEN 116 

BARNES COLLETTE VIRGINIA 95 

BARNES JAMES DOUGLAS 1 16 

BARNES KARIN ANNE 116 

BARNES PATRICIA A 59, 154 

BARNETTE ROBIN RENE 59. 154. 155 

BARON MICHAEL SETH 116 

BARRETT JODl LYNNE 59 

BARRITT MARTIN STEWART 116 

BARROW PATRICIA ANNE 59 

BARRY THERESA TETA 16. 17. 59. 146. 148. 149 

BARSNESS ERIC A 95 

BARTLEMAY HOWARD JAMES 116 

BARTON CHRISTOPHER BRUCE 59. 147. 176. 177 

BARTON TARA ALANE 116 

BASDEN DONALD ANDREW 95 

BASTEK BOB 175 

BASTEK MAUREEN ELIZABETH 13. 58. 59. 61. 172. 

184. 185. 239, 91 

BATES STEFANIE LYNN 116. 139 

BAUCOM CHARLA 48 

BAUMANN STEPHANIE 59 

BAXTER DEBORAH ELINOR 12. 95. 149 

BAXTER SUSANNAH LEIGH 95. 176. 185. 194, 195 

BAYDUSH AMY DENISE 95. 155 

BAYDUSH JOEL SCOTT 154 

BEAL BONNIE LEE 59, 154. 161 

BEANEY ELIZABETH JEAN 116. 157 

RFABn HAWN MARIF Q5 

BEASLEY MARIE AMELIA 59. 144. 145 

BEATON JASON BUTLER 95. 171 

BECK MICHAEL TODD 116 

BECKER WILLIAM JAMES III 116. 187. 197 

BELCHER CHRISTOPHER JOHN 95 

BELDA ROBERT CRAIG 59 

BELECHAK JOHN THOMAS 59 

BELL DAVID JOSEPH 59. 156 

BELL ELIZABETH CHRISTINE 116 

BELL JOYCE ELAINE 59 

BELL MARTA 59 

BELLO BRODERICK CANDE 116. 139, 158, 159. 161 

BELOTE NANCY KATHRYN 59 

BENHAM GILBERT THOMAS 59. 68. 69. 171, 186, 187, 

188. 92. 193 

BENNET CAREN MICHELLE 95 

BENNETT CRISTAL LEE 117 

BENSON DAVID MEYER 95 

BERCIER MIRIAM E 1 17 

BERGEN JAMES DALLAS 60 

BERGSTEDT KEVIN MERRILL 95 

BERMAN STEVEN ROBERT JR 60 

BERNICK PATRICIA 49 

BERRY SANDRA GAYLE 60. 154 

BESHIRS. DAVID RUSSELL 60. 176 

BESHIRS MARK STEPHEN 117 

BESS MARLYN KAY 95, 154 

BEYER ERIC WILLIAM 60 

BIANCO JOHN THOMAS 60. 144. 156 

BICKERSTAFF MEGN LEE 117. 190. 191 

BIESECKER LARRY 117 

BIGHAM BELINDA ANN 60 

BISHARD .JOHN K 95 

BLACK HFATHFR 60, 154 

BLACK PATRICIA M 1 17 

BLACKBURN Wll 1 lAM H III 1 17 

BLAIR CHRISTEN RAY 1 17 

BLAIR EDWARD HYl E 117 

BLANCHFR WENDY .JEAN 60 

BLANTON CHRIsrOPHER 117. 168. 169 

BLEH THOMAS MICHAEL 95. 154 

BLEVINS KATHLEEN SUZANNE 60, 141. 149 

BLOOM TAMMY ELYSE 95 

BLOUNT nrVKRl Y ANNF 117 

BOCHERT 1 AdRIE MICHEl IE 95. 155 

BOE RANDALL EDWARD I 17 

BOETTE BETH ANN 60. 145 

BOGGS CHARLES ROBERT 95. 155 

BOGLER PAUL FREDERICK 95 

BONDURANT SAMUEL LOUIS 95. 174. 175 

BONDURANT SCOTT 175 

BONE JAMES TODD 60 

BONE TAMELA DIANNE 117 

BONNEY JUDY 40. 49. 146. 147 

BONEY SUSAN MICHELLE 60. 138 

BONNEY JR RONALD GENE 60 

BOOMER MARK RAY 95 

BOOTH LAUREN MICHELLE 117. 190 

BORDY AMY ANNE 1 17 



BORDY EMILY RUTH 60. 62. 68. 69. 136. 137. 146. 18( 

181. 215 

60UDELL MICHAEL JOSEPH 60 

BOWDEN MARK THOMAS 95 

BOWE CAROLINE MICHELLE 117 

BOWERS CHARLES HOWARD 117 

BOYD KIMBERLY INELL 95 

BOYETTE REBECCA ELAINE 95. 117 

BOYLE RHONDA RENEE 60 

BOYLE ROBERT WAYNE 117 

BOYNTON ALVIN FRANK 117 

BRADSHAW SCOTT DALL 96 

BRAFFORD KIMBERLY DAWN 117 

BRANDON LORI ANN 96. 176 

BRAUN BOB 49. 178 

BRAUN ERIC MATTHEW 117 

BREAKFIELD WILLIAM V 96 

BRENNER CHRISTOPHER WADE 60 

BRENNER PATRICK WILLIAM 96 

BREWER JOSEPH LEE 96. 176. 187 

BRICE CYNTHIA PAIGE 60 

BRIGGS JOSEPH LANE 187, 189 

BRINES MICHELLE YVONNE 96 

BRINN APRIL DOREEN 117 

BRINN KATHLEEN MICHELLE 13. 96. 149 

BRISCOE RONALD DAVID 60 

BRITTON LORI LYNN 1 17 

BROBST JEANNE 49 

BROCKMAN JASON MICHAEL 117 

BROOKS DOUGLAS SCOTT 1 17 

BROWN ADAM CLARK 61 

BROWN CHERYL DEANNE 61. 99 

BROWN CHERYL LYNN 61. 91 

BROWN DAVID 1 17. 189 

BROWN DENISE LYN 96 

BROWN DIANE RENEE 117 

BROWN HARRY RODERICK 96. 175 

BROWN IDA 49 

BROWN MELISSA ANN 117. 139 

BROWN PAMELA DENISE 154 

BROWN PATRICK CANAVAN 117. 155 

BROWN SHARON LEE 61, 151 

BROWN THOMAS MICHAEL 61. 176. 91. 193, 194 

BRUCE SUSAN ELAINE 96. 160 

BRUDZINSKI RANDOLPH J 117 

BRUN DAVID 175 

BRYAN TERSA REY 117 

BRYANT DEAN NICKIE 96. 193 

BRYANT JANE ELIZABETH 96 

BRYANT JEFFREY STUART 96 

BRYANT KELLY MARIE 96 

BRYANT KRISTIN ANN 117 

BRYANT LYNNELL ELIZABETH 61 

BUCHANAN HELEN ELIZABETH 61. 155 

BUCHANAN JACK EUGENE 117 

BUCHARDT MARK EDWARD 96 

BUCKLEY MICHELLE KAY 96 

BUCKLEY MONICA LIN (6, 137 

BUDDO JAMES SOMERVILLE 61 

BUENO ARACELI C 61. 156 

BUKOVAC CATHY ANN I 17 

BUNCH BRETT DEAN 96 

BUNTING JACQUELINE FAYE 61. 65. 144. 160 

BURDETTE TAMMY MARIA 61 

BURGESS TODD ANTHONY 117 

BURKE CALVIN CLIFTON 61 

BURKHART DANIEL RICHARD 96 

BURLAMACHI JEAN ANNE 117 

BURNETT DANIEL CLARK 96 

BURNETT DANIEL CL ARK 96 

BURNETT KEVIN MARK 155 

BURNS JOHN ROD 1 17 

BURNS I AURA I EE 117 

BURNS SANDRA MARIE 96. 151 154 

BUTCHER STEVEN PATRICK 118 

BUTTENSCHON MORTEN 61 

BYRD JOHN CARL TON 96 



CCcc 



CADDELL GREGORY WAYNE 6. 96. I 19 

CAFRITZ BRIAN ALLEN 96. 137 

CAHOON KEVIN A 61. 154. 156 

CAIN GREGORY PAUl 96 

CAIN THOMAS HLRNARD 1 18 

CAITHNESS GARY 96 

CAL DWt 1 1 AL Df N f L l/ABETH 61 



228/ Index 



^^^" 



CALDWELL BENJAMIN D 1 18 

CALDWELL CHARLES 9, 14, 46. 47 

CALLIS JGLIE KAY 62 

CAMPBELL ELIZABETH ANNE 96 

CAMPBELL KASEY 178, 179 

CAMPBELL LINDA MICHELLE 62 

CAMPBELL NANCY ELIZABETH 118. 155 

CAMPBELL PAUL D 118 

CAMPBELL WALTER E 162 

CANNON CARA ANNE 118 

CANNON WILLIAM GLENN 118 

CAPWELL CHRISTINE MARIE 96 

CAPWELL DAVID ALLEN 62 

CARAGAN ABRAHAM M 96 

CARLTON JILL MARIE 62. 141 

CARMINE ROBERT GAMBRALL 118 

CARMOCK JENNIFER MARIE 118 

CAROLINO YOLANDO VERGARA 58. 62. 89. 156, 218 

CAROLLO JOAN MARIE 62 

CARPENTER AMY LYNN 118, 155 

CARPENTER APRIL LYN 62, 154 

CARPENTER BETH 172 

CARPENTER LAURIE SUE 118 

CARPENTER TINA JOY 118 

CARR JAMES ALBERT 118 

CARR KATHLEEN 1 18, 161 

CARR MARIPAT 62 

CARRIKER MARGARET COLLET 62, 141, 148, 149, 151 

CARRIKER ROBERT H 118 

CARROLL ANDREA DEVORE 96, 155 

CARTER CHRISTOPHER KEVIN 96 

CASKEY SHARON MICHELE 118 

CASON KIMBERLY HOPE 62 

CASTANEDA RONALD JAMES 118, 161 

CASTILLO RAUL D 62 

CASTLES ANNE GRAY 62 

CATALANO PEER ROCCO 96, 146, 171, 187 

CAUDLE KIMBERLY ANN 62 

CERCHIARO LISA M 62, 155 

CHALFIN VICTORIA PAIGE 62. 138. 139, 161. 42 

CHAMBERLAIN MARK JOHN 118 

CHAPMAN MATTHEW ARTHUR 118 

CHAPPELL EARL 49, 175 

CHAPPELLE JEFFREY LEE 118 

CHASSE BRENDA GAIL 96 

CHASSE KAREN ANN 118, 147. 164 

CHAVES KAREN MARIE 118. 190 

CHAVES MIGUEL ANDY 62. 197 

CHEN LILLY DIANE 62. 66. 67. 138. 139. 144. 146. 160. 

91 

CHERRY KIMBERLY YVETTE 63 

CHIUSANO VINCENT PETER 23. 61. 63 

CHOVITZ BARRY PETER 63. 77. 146. 148. 149, 158, 90, 

236 

CHRISTIAN RICKY 178, 179 

CHRISTIE WARREN B III 60. 63. 79. 142, 147. 187 

CHUNG KU 178 

CHURCH KIMBERLY ANN 96 

CHURCH MAC DENNIS 118, 187 

CHURCHIN CINDY MARIE 97 

CINIBULK BRUCE A 97, 187, 189 

CLAAR LAWRENCE REGINALD 118 

CLAMP JAMIE LYNN 97. 155 

CLARK JULIANNA JOY 118. 137 

CLARK REGINA YVONNE 118 

CLARK RICHARD 183 

CLARK SCOTT WILLIAM 8. 16. 17. 61. 63. 102. 148. 

149, 158. 90. 236 

CLARKE ELIZABETH BROWNLE 118 

CLARKE JOSEPH C 97 

CLARKE PATRICK HUNTER 97 

CLARKE ROBERT MARK 118. 155, 183 

CLEMONS KIMBERLY ROBIN 118 

CLUVERIUS AMY ELIZABETH 63 

COCHRAN EVANS 36, 49 

COCHRAN SANDRA LOU 97 

COCHRAN VIRGIL CORNELIUS 97 

COCKEY LYDIA COUNCILMAN 118 

COFER CLAIBORNE FENTRESS 118 

COFER RONALD STEPHEN 118 

COFFEY MELANIE DAWN 119, 154 

COHEN JEFFREY CHARLES 119. 160 

COHEN ROSE 49 

COHEN SANDRA SUSAN 61. 63. 147, 172, 185 

COHEN SEAN DAVID 119 

COLE MARK WESLEY 97 

COLEMAN LATUNYA MONIQUE 119 

COLEY SUSAN LAVERNE 119 

COLLINS JAMES MICHAEL 97 

COLLINS KATHERINE ANN 63 

COLLINS LANA 97 

COLLINS SCOTT DOUGLAS 118, 175 

COLSON GAYLE M 63 

COLUCCI KAREN ANNE 61, 63, 146, 147, 172 

COLUCCI THOMAS ANDREW 119, 187 

COLVIN DONNA MARIE 119 

COMEAU STEVEN ROBERT 63, 154 

COMERFORD DANIEL PATRICK 97 



COMERFORD MATTHEW EUGENE 119 

COMESS JILL ELIZABETH 63. 119. 151, 160 

COMPTON DALE 49 

COMPTON DARRELL EDWARD 119 

COMPTON DUANE PHILIP 63 

COMPTON LORIE 9, 49 

CONCEPCION RONILLO 119 

CONDON PECANNE AMORETTE 97, 139. 142, 149 

CONLEY JARED ALAN 119 

CONNERTON ANNE 49. 55 

CONNERTON MARY 172 

CONRAD TINA LOUISE 1 19 

CONWAY MARY ELIZABETH 70. 97. 142 

CONYERS RONALD JAMES 97, 187, 189 

COOK BRIAN GREGORY 16, 119. 161 

COOK PETE 166 

COOKE MICHAEL D 154 

COOKE MICHAEL D 54 

COOPER DIANA L 63 

COOPER GLENN SCOTT 119 

COOPER PATRICIA ANN 119 

COOPERMAN DOUGLAS PAUL 97, 156 

COOPERMAN KENNETH MARC 64 

COPELAND HENRY PERKINS 97 

COPELAND KELLY ANNE 64. 155 

COSTON ALONZO CORNELIUS 176. 119 

COTE RENEE EILEEN 97 

COTTRELL WILLIAM LONNIE 97 

CUNTS LISA ROBIN 64. 154 

COUSINS ELIZABETH ANN 98 

COWAN AMY DIANE 98, 155 

COWAN ELIZABETH 119 

COWAN WANDA C 64 

COX WENDY SUE 119 

COX WILLIAM BEVERLY 98 

CREEK REGINA BETH 119, 151 

CROCKETT ROBERT LYNN 64 

CRONIN RAYMOND ALAN 98 

CRONK STEPHANIE ANN 98. 109 

CROSS JR FRANKLIN A 119 

CROSS MARIA 49 

CROUCH PETRA 49 

CROWDER CHRIS ROBERT 119 

CROWLEY JOANNA CHRISTINE 98 

CRUNK JOHN MARK 1 19 

CRUZ FRANCISCO LOVETH 98 

CRUZ ROBELEl 119 

CULLOM NANNETTE FAYE 138. 139, 43 

CULVER JOYCE 119 

CUMMINGS AMANDA G 154 

CUMMINGS CHRISTINA EVA 119, 160 

CUMMINGS SCOTT ANDREW 155 

CUNNINGHAM KEITH ALAN 98 

CUNNINGHAM RICH 187 

CURRAN MICHELLE ANNE 119 

CUTCHINS KENDALL ANNE 98, 151 



DDdd 



DAIKOS MICHELLE LYNN 119, 155 

DAILEY JOHN MICHAEL 98 

DALE DEBRA LYNETTE 119 

DANA ALISA MARIE 1 19 

DANGANAN JO ANN 119 

DANGANAN LEILANI BALDOS 98 

DANIELS MARILYN JANE 64, 146 

DANIELSON HARVEY SCOTT 64, 196, 197 

DANKMYER CHARLES 98, 170, 171. 187 

DANN ASHLEY 99 

DANTONIO LAURA LYNNE 14, 98. 164 

DARRAH JEFFREY SCOTT 19. 64. 98, 151 

DAUGHERTY LORI ISABEL 119 

DAUGHTREY ANITA LYNN 64, 155 

DAUGHTRY PATRICK J 98 

DAVENPORT AMY LYNN 64 

DAVENPORT FRANKLIN HUGHE 64 

DAVID ANNA CORAZON 98 

DAVIES WENDY ELIZABETH 65 

DAVIS AMY ELIZABETH 98 

DAVIS ELIZABETH ANN 155 

DAVIS HAROLD CLARK 18, 34. 94, 95. 98, 102 

DAVIS KATHLEEN FRANCES 65 

DAVIS MICHAEL ALAN 119 

DAVIS ROBERT SCOTT 60, 142. 147. 187, 27 

DEAL MATTHEW CHRISTOPHER 119 

DEAN DENISE ELLEN 99 

DEAN KIMBERLY DAWN 99, 168, 169 

DEANGELO MARK ANTHONY 65 

DEANGELO MICHAEL LAWRENCE 65, 84 

DEANGELO PETER ANDREW 119, 187 

DEBLAKER BARBARA ANN 119 

DEBOBES DIANE 65, 139. 146 

DEEGAN EILEEN MARY 65. 149 

DEEGAN KEVIN ROBERT 119. 155 

DEEL MICHAEL S 9 

DEJESUS CHRISTINA LYNN 99, 142, 182 

DEJESUS JAY ANTHONY 119, 189 



DEJESUS MARC CHRISTOPHER 119, 187 
DELANO ELIZABETH C 65 
DELCARMEN JOHN 99 
DELK JILL I ORRAINE 65 
DELOATCHE ROBIN DARLENE 2. 99. 151 
DELOATCHE WILLIAM CHARLE 99 
DELULLO JOHN 99 
DELUNA JULIAN REQUINTO 119 
DELVECCHIO JOHN DAVID 119 
DEMARTINO JOHN 99. 175 
DeMERS RENEE 49. 138. 139 
DENNIE JOSEPH W 119 
DePEW PRISCILLA 49, 158 
DEPTA SCOTT JEROME 99. 159, 176 
DEROCHER BETH A 99, 145. 159, 176, 182 
DESARRO JOHNNY JAMES 65 
DEVARY LIESL RENEE 65 
DEWBERRY CHERI ANNE 119 
DICKERSON DAWN FARROW 119 
DICKMAN BARRY ISAAC 99. 119. 148. 149 
DILEONARDO MARIE LYNN 65 
DILLMAN KELLY DOLORES 65. 154 
DILLMAN ROBERT 99. 157 
DILLS CHIAKI 65. 154. 155 
DIMARCO CHARLES I 19 
DIMMER MICHAEL PAUL 120 
DIMMICK ROBERT MICHAEL 65 
DINSMORE CHRISTOPHER 17. 99. 149, 158, 159 
DOBLER ALEXIS LOUISE 65, 194 
DODGE LORI ANN 120 
DODSON WILLIAM RUSSELL 99, 178, 179 
DOHMANN MARY DEANNA 99, 161 
DOHMANN SANDRA 172 
DOLIN DEBRA JOY 120 
DOMBROWSKI AMY PATRICIA 65, 154 
DONAHUE JOHN BROOKE 120 
DONNARUMMA CAROL ANN 65, 139, 154 
DOOLITTLE SHANNON 50. 161 
DORLAND MICHELLE JEAN 120 
DOUGHTIE KIRBY O'NEAL 120 
DOUGHTY WENDY MARIE 99 
DOUGLAS JEFFREY LAWRENCE 126 
DOWNING KAREN ALINE 66 
DOYLE THOMAS FRANCIS 120 
DOYLE WENDY CHRISTINE 120 
DOZIER D J. 170, 171, 176 
DRAKE TERRI LYNNE 99. 147. 176, 194 
DREWRY BETTE CATHLEEN 99 
DRISKELL DANIEL HOLLAND 99 
DUARTE DENISE 120 
DULIN SERENA DIANE 66, 154 
DUNCAN ANNE HOLLANDSWORT 120 
DUNN ASHLEY CATHERINE 99, 147, 176 
DUNN BRYAN 120 
DUNN MICHAEL SEAN 120 
DUNSHEE KAREN E 66 
.DUPUIS DANIELLA ANNE 120 
DUPUIS ROBERT KEITH"99 
DURAND JUSTIN CHRIS 120 
DURKEE SAMANTHA 120 
'DURNEY KIMBERLY marie 120 



EEee 



42 



EASON BRYAN FITZPATRICK 99 

EATON ELIZABETH DIANE 99 

EDNEY JEFFREY ALLEN 66, 149 

EDOFF BARBARA 50 

EHLE TORY 176, 177 

EHLY AUDREY A 66 

EICHOLTZ SCOTT ALAN 176 

EINTHOVEN LONNICA A 66 

ELIAS JOSEPH 50, 160 

ELLER SWAIN WARRINGTON 39, 99 

ELLIOTT MARK ALI 120 

ELLIS AMY MICHELLE 99 

ELLIS EDWARD DARREN 120 

ELLIS JAMES DAVID 99 

ELLIS JOHN 166 

ELUTO SHERRY KAY 99, 161 

EMERSON SHERI ELIZABETH 120 

EMERY MAURICE W 99 

EMORY LISA ANN 99 

ENG SIMON WAI 120, 161 

ENGLE ROBERT ALLEN 99, 171 

ENSLIN ROBERT CRAIG 120 

ERB VICTORIA ANNE 120 

ERNY LORI ANN 120 

ESCUCHA KATHLEEN 120 

ESPITTIA DONALD 120 

EVANS AMOS ROLAND 120 

EVANS MARK WILLIAM 120 



93 



FFff 



Index/229 



FAITH PETER JOSEPH 66 

FAJARDO DALE EMMANUEL 99. 157. 161 

FALCH HOLLY MICHELE 120 

FALK KIRK DONALD 97. 99. 187 

FAM ALBERT LEE 66 

FARIS CHERYL ANN 100. 172 

FARMER TAMALA ANN 66 

FARRER FREDERICK CHARLES 66. 154 

FARRER JACK 66 

FARY TERESA 50 

FASANARO STEPHEN MICHAEL 66. 155 

FATKIN ERIC DAVID 100 

FEENEY ERIC KRISTIAN 120 

FEIGENBAUM JOHN ALAN 120 

FELLERS APRIL DAWN 66 

FENTON ELIZABETH SETON 66. 154. 155 

FENTRESS CHERYL ANN 100 

FENTRESS WILLIAM JEFFREY 120 

FERGUSON BLAIR 175 

FERGUSON BRIAN DAVID 100. 155 

FERGUSON PIPER LAURIE 66. 154. 155 

FERRARI GINA LOUISE 67 

FERRARI JODI LYNN 155 

FIELDS ROBERT NATHANIEL 120 

FIJAK KEVIN SCOTT 100 

FIKE JEFFREY MICHAEL 120 

FILOMARINO GEORGE DANIEL 120 

FIMIAN LAURIE JAYNE 100, 168, 169 

FISCHER RICHARD MATTHEW 100, 155 

FISHER JAYN ANN 67 

FITCH DAWN LOUISE 67. 72 

FLAGG SUSAN CARROLL 160 

FLATLEY BARBARA ELIZABETH 67 

FLATLEY RONALD JOSEPH 120 

FLEENOR DEBRA LYNN 38 

FLETCHER TERESA ROCHELL 31. 67. 142. 146 

FLINT CHRISTOPHER SCOTT 120 

FLINT THERESA JANE 67. 153 

FLIPPEN TROY ALEX 100, 155 

FLOOD ANDREA LORRAINE 100 

FLORA KENNETH L 120 

FLORES DENNISE ANN 100, 155 

FLOWERS ALYSSA JEANENE 67. 151 

FOGLE STEPHEN EDWARD 67 

FOJTIK DIANE MARIE 100, 154 

FOJTIK MICHAEL GLENN 67 

FOLEY ROBERT BRYAN 19. 67 

FONE WILLIAM JAMES 120 

FONTANARES ALAN PAUL 5, 21, 100, 144, 145, 149, 

161 

FONVILLE MIKE 176, 177 

FORBES DONNA LYNN 100, 154, 202 

FORBES MEREDITH PAIGE 67 

FORD MATTHEW LANE 120, 187 

FORD THOMAS LEE 67, 155 

FOREHAND AMY MILLS 121 

FOREHAND JULIA EVELYN 100 

FORREST JENNIFER LYNN 121. 151 

FORTUNE NICKI LYNN 121 

FOSTER BRAD 166 

FOUT GEOFFREY ALFRED 100. 162. 170, 171, 187, 27 

FOX DENNY LEE 121 

FOXWELL KELLIE LYNN 100 

FRANCE CAROLYN ANNE 100 

FRANCIS CHRISTOPHER O 100, 147. 170, 187 

FRANCIS MARIBETH 67, 137, 147, 164 

FRANCISCO AMY LYNN 100, 149, 151 

FRANKLIN AMY MICHELLE 121 

FRANKLIN BRUCE RICHARD 121 

FRANKLIN STEFANIE LYNN 67. 155 

FRANKS DAVID WILLIAM 121 

FRAZIER REBECCA SUE 100 

FREEMAN JOHN DULLIGAN 121. 187, 193 

FREEMAN TIMOTHY MICHAEL 50. 100. 176, 187. 189 

FRENCH DONNIE WILLIAM 67. 183 

FREY SUZETTE MARIE 100 

FRIEDMAN MERRILL ALISA 100 

FRIEDMAN SHERRI SUE 121. 148 

FRIESZ MATTHEW WAYNE 121 

FUDALA JOHN SEBASTIAN 100. 154 

FULGHAM DAVID 67 

FULK SANDRA LYNN 121 

FULKERSON DEBORAH LYNN 121 

FUQUA JANE ELYCE 67. 142 

FUSS DIANE LOUISE 67. 160 

FUSSELL JAMES DAVID 61. 67. 196. 197 

FUSSELL SARAH ANN 12. 100, 147, 164, 190 

FUTCH GLENDA 50 

FUTRAL CAROL 50, 135 

GAHAGAN RALPH 50, 186, 187. 188 

FUTRELL SUSAN REBECCA 100 



GGgg 



GALBRAITH WENDY YVONNE 145 
GALLOWAY EVELYN HOBBS 100 
CARD LINDA LEIGH 100 
GARDNER KELLIE MARIE 101. 155 



GARDNER KEVIN SCOTT 151, 215 

GARDNER NEIL BRANDON 101 

GARDNER TAMMY GLYNN 101. 121 

GARRABRANT MICHAEL P 101 

GARRISON ANNA LISSA 121 

GARRISON JOHANNA MARIE 168 

GARZA TIMOTHY MICHAEL 41, 67. 43 

GATDULA EFREN KENNETH 121 

GAVIN HELEN 154. 34. 50 

GEDDIE ELIZABETH CATON 116. 117, 121 

GEORGE CARLOS 176, 177, 182. 183 

GEORGE CHARLES EDWARD 68. 26 

GEORGE ELLA MARIA 121 

GEORGE JOHNNY WINSTON II 121 

GEORGE MARTIN 183 

GEORGE REINA MARIA 44, 101, 176. 182 

GERALD KAREN MICHELLE 68 

GERASCH MARK ALAN 68 

GERSTEIN WM FRED ALLEN 101 

GIBBINGS DAVID RUSSELL 156 

GIBSON ANGELA LEIGH 68 

GIBSON DENISE RENE 121 

GIBSON LISA ANNETTE 121 

GIBSON TINA KAY 68 

GILBERT CHRISTIN LEIGH 121 

GILBERT DAVID MARK 121 

GILLEN COLLEEN ANN 112 

GILLIAM JEFFREY WAYNE 101, 154 

GILMORE DANTE D 121 

GINN DANIEL ROWE 101 

GIROUX ROBERT THOMAS 121 

GLADDEN CHRISTOPHER THOM 101, 175 

GLADSTONE LINDA 101, 176 

GLICK CINDY MILLETTE 101 

GLICKMAN THOMAS EDWARD 68, 75, 220 

GODDARD SHAWN PATRICK 121 

GOFF JEFF 133 

GOFF LARRY HUNT 121 

GONZAGA MELISSA REBECCA 68, 

GONZAGA ZABRINA MINERVA 121, 

GONZALES JAY CYRIL 121. 197 

GOODMAN SHARON LAUREN 101, 

GOODOVE MICHAEL LEE 101, 107, 

GOODWIN MARY TERESE 68, 139, 

GOODWIN ROBERT LEO III 121 

GORE JENNIFER ANN 121 

GOZUM RICKY MENDOZA 121 

GRADY JOHN CAMERON 68, 176 

GRAF ALEXANDRA DANILOVNA 121 

GRAHAM RICHARD BRADLEY 39 

GRANT ADRIENNE NICOLE 121 

GRANT LISA MARIE 101 

GRAY AMY CECELIA 68. 136. 137. 215 

GRAY BRIAN EDWARD 121 

GREEN HENRY KYLE 9, 68, 89, 206 

GREENE GEORGE ROBERT 68, 155 

GREENE LISA MARIE 68 

GREENE RONALD HARRIS 68 

GREENE SUSANNE 122 

GREGORY BRENDA 50 

GREHAWICK MELISSA LOUISE 14, 101, 109, 164 

GRICE SHERRY LYNN 122 

GRIFFIN TERRI LYNN 68 

GRIFFITH KARI ANN 101. 

GRIGGS JO ANNE 36, 69, 

GRIMSTEAD DOLORES 7, 

GRISAFI TAMMY ELAINE 

GRISSOM TODD ALLEN 69 

GROB TAMMY JEAN 101, 7. 181 

GROSS ELIZABETH LOWELL 101, 

GRUBBS CAROLINE 122 

GRUMBACH DORIS ANN 69, 148, 149, 151 

GUALTIERI COLETTE ANITA 122 

GUINDON GEORGE NORTON 122 

GUINN DON 177 

GULICK JEAN 50, 160 

GUMABAY ALBERT FELIX 101. 154 

GUTHRIE BRYAN LEE 122 

GUYER JENNIFER LYNN 101 

GUYTON DAVID CHARLES 122 



139. 


144, 


161 




139, 


144, 


159. 


161 


151, 


161 






160 








144, 


161 







155 
155 
50 
122 



147, 181 



HHhh 



HAAS CALDER CHRISTIAN 122, 183 

HAAS HEATHER DAWN 101 

HADLEY BRIAN WAYNE 122, 128 

HAGEN THOMAS KIRBY 101, 155 

HAGFR DAVID RUSSELL JR 68, 69, 160 

HAGY DOUGLAS KIRK 122 

HAIDEN AMY 122 

HALBRAITH WENDY 121 

HALE JAY EASON 101 

HAL L ALESIA RENE 69, 236 

HALL DONNA 50 

HALL LISA JEAN 69, 114 

HALl MICHAEL KEVIN 122 

HALL RICHARD PHILIP 122 

HALLORAN SYLVIA 50 



HAMEL RONALD JOHN 101 

HAMILTON BRANDON JAMES 122. 187 

HAMILTON ELIZABETH 101 

HAMILTON MICHELLE ALICE 69 

HAMLIN WILLIAM 50 

HAMMONDS CYNTHIA FAYE 122 

HAMPEL CANDACE CAYE 102 

HAMRICK ASHLEY CLAY 102 

HANBURYSALLIEJO 102. 109. 142. 143, 149 157 158 

159 

HANNAH LEIGH KATHRYN 122 

HARBISON DOAK WADE 69 

HARBISON KIP ANDREW 122, 187 

HARDIN LYNN MARIE 122 

HARDIN TERESA L 69 

HARDISON DIXIE LEE 69 

HARDISON PRISCILLA ANN 102 

HARDY SUSAN MARIE 122 

HARO CECILIA 69, 149 

HARRELL AMY BETH 122. 155 

HARRINGTON DAVID MARK 102, 151 

HARRIS AMY JOLENE 102 

HARRIS DAVID JAMES 102, 202 

HARRIS GARY DEAN 69 

HARRIS GREGORY PATRICK 122 

HARRIS KAREN ELIZABETH 69. 154 

HARRIS KERRIE LYNN 122 

HARRIS KRISTAL LYNETTE 69, 176. 177 

HARRIS WANDA SHERRY 102 

HARRISON BRIAN THOMAS 122 

HARRISON JEAN 51 

HART JUDI LYNN 69. 139. 144. 145. 161 

HARWELL ANGELA MARIE 102 

HAVERSON JILL 155 

HASKETT ROBERT LEE 69. 154 

HASSELL JOSEPH 46, 47 

HASSON KIMBERLY ANN 69 

HASTINGS KATRINA LEANNE 102. 139 

HAVERSON JILL RENEE 69 

HAWTHORNE KATHY LYNNE 69 

HAYES GINGER 43. 168. 169 

HAYES JAMES GREGORY 102 

HAYES VIRGINIA DARE yO 

HAYMES CHRIS 179 

HAYMES JOHN THOMAS 101. 102. 178 

HAZZARD LORI L 70 

HEADDEN GEORGE HARDY 102 

HEATH REBECCA LYNNE 70 

HELBIG AUDREY ELIZABETH 70 

HELVY LANZE SCOTT 70 

HENDERSON HOLLY E 122 

HENDRICKS SUSAN ELLEN 122 

HENDRIX CAROLINE M 122 

HENNESAY ARTHUR KENNETH 122 

HENNESSY COLLEEN 102 

HENNESSY LAURA ANN 102 

HENRY CAROLINE ANN 122. 131 

HENRY DANIEL BRIAN 70 

HENRY DAVID LEE 122 

HENRY MARK GLEN 102 

HERRIT HOPE DENISE 70, 155 

HIATT JR E CHARLES 122 

HICKEY YVONNE MICHELLE 102 

HICKS CHERYL MONIQUE 102 

HICKS ROBERT GARLAND 61. 70. 146, 147. 187, 189 

HILDEBRAND WALTER H JR 70 

HILTON DAVID VINCENT 61, 70. 193 

HILTON MICHAEL EASTWOOD 122 

HILTON MICHELLE 160 

HILTON TODD MILES 102 

HIMCHAK CATHLEEN DOLORES 70. 138. 139, 146, 91 

HINDA DAVID JEROME 70 

HINES ROBERT S IV 102 

HINSON ANGELA DAWN 102 

HINSON JEFFERY SCOTT 70 

HIRT ANNICE MARIE 3, 13, 70 

HOBBS WILLIAM PAGE 122 

HOCK LIESL RENEE 70 

HODGE DEBORAH SUZANNE 102 

HODGES CHARLES WILLIAM 70. 171 

HODGES JENNIFER CHRISTIN 122 

HODGES SARAH LEIGH 102 

HOEKE JOHAN L 70, 160 

HOFFER THERESA RENE 102 

HOFFMAN ALEX SCOTT 9, 71, 171 

HOFHEIMER KERRY 102 

HOGGE MARTHA FSTELLE 71 

HOINESS MICHHIF JOY 123 

HOLBERT I INDA ANN 123 

HOLCOLM RICHARD 160 

HOLCOMB JOHN R 102 

HOLLAND LISA 71 

HOLLIDAY SHEIIA I YNN 123 

HOLLINGSWORIM KAIHRYN L 71, 154, 155 

MICHAFI HOLIOWAY T 176, 177 

HOLMAN DOROTHY ANNETTE 123 

HOLMAN LMILY YVETTE 123 

HOLMAN MICHELLE ADAIR 102 

HOLMSTOCK JOEL MICAH 71 



?30'ln<lex 



Image Index 



HOLMSTOCK RAMDI ANN 10.' 

HOLT ROBERT HAROLD 123. 187 

HOLTER WENDY SCE 123 

HOMER JUSTINE 123 

HOOKS SANDRA LEE 103 

HOPPE HEIDI LINDA 123 

HOPPER THOMAS JOHN 71 

HORNER CHRISTOPHER ALAN 123 

HORSCH RICHARD ARTHUR 71. 137. 146. 148. 149. 156 

HORTON JOHN CHRISTOPHER 103. 155 

HORTON RAOUL KYLE 123 

HOSKINS SUSAN LESLIE 71. 138. 139. 42 

HOUDE KIMBER JOJUAN 71 

HOUSER MELISSA CHRISTINE 103. 149. 181 

HOWARD ROBERT STEWART 71. 154 

HOWE STEVE 103 

HOWELL ADRIENNE DAVIS 123 

HOWELL CHRISTINE LOUISE 71 

HOWELL CINDY ANN 71. 155 

HOWELL KAREN LYNN 103 

HOWIE MARGARET RENE 123. 155 

HRON MICHAEL AARON 103 

HSU SUSAN MING 123 

HUDGINS MATT 170. 171 

HUDSON CRAIG R 18. 68. 69. 71. 137, 146, 236 

HUDSON JULIE ANNE 71, 154 

HUDSON KEVIN M 123. 183 

HUFTON ANDREW SCOTT 123 

HUGHES DANIEL EDWARD 123 

HUGHES JOHN KEANE 103 

HUGHES TAMMY RENEE 123 

HUGHES TRACEY BELEN 103 

HUGO ANNA F 123 

HULATT SHAWN PATRICK 123 

HULL ELIZABETH PEYTON 103. 176. 182 

HUMERICK JILLIAN LEE 123, 139 

HUMPHREYS DIANE LYNN 94, 95. 103 

HUNT KENNETH F JR 71 

HUNTER THOMAS WILLIAM 103, 171 

HURST BELINDA ANN 123, 155 

HURVITZ DEBORA LYNNE 71 

HUTCHESON DAVID WAYNE 71, 155 

HUTCHESON TYE KENNETH 123 

HUTCHINS GLEN DOUGLAS 123 

HUX EDWARD JAMES 123 



Ilii 



183 



lANSON LAWRENCE W 176 
IDSINGA LARA 103. 158, 160 
IGANA AL ANDREW 123 
INFANTINO THOMAS 41, 103 
INSCORE SABRINA JEAN 123 
INSKEEP DUANE THOMAS 71 
ISENHOUR ELIZABETH ANN 103 



54 



JJjj 



JACKA ANDREA LYNN 103 

JACKSON DANA ANN 72 

JACKSON DELANEA ANN 72 

JACKSON LORI ANN 72 

JACOBSON STEPHANIE K 103, 154, 161 

JAECQUES ROBERT JOHN 123 

JAFFE ROBIN BETH 16, 21, 103 

JAGGERS JENE MARIE 123, 160 

JAMES JENNIFER CORINNE 72 

JAMES STEPHANIE LYNN 123 
1 JAMISON JILL ANN 103, 135, 145, 164 
I JEFFRIES MICHAEL BRUCE 123 
I JENKINS KATHERINE E 14, 94. 95, 103, 137 

JENKINS PHILLIP WANE 123, 150. 155 

JENKINS WENDALL 123 

JENNESTREET WILLIAM J 72 

JENNINGS JENNIFER LYNN 123 

JENNINGS KEITH DOUGLAS 103 

JENSEN TERESA LYNN 72, 154 

JERNIGAN ANGELA 123 

JOANIDES JOHN 51 

JOE BONNIE MARGRETTA 123 

JOE TRACEY RICHARD 72. 170, 171 

JOHNSON CHRISTINE 135 

JOHNSON CHRISTOPHER M 123 

JOHNSON CYNTHIA LYNN 103 

JOHNSON DANA MARIE 72 

JOHNSON EARL A 123 



JOHNSON HOLLY ELIZABETH 123 

JOHNSON JOE 30 

JOHNSON KAREN ELIZABETH 72 

JOHNSON MELISSA LYNN 124 

JOHNSON NOAH DAVID 103 

JOHNSON ROGER FRANCIS 103 

JOHNSON THOMAS SCOTT 124, 189 

JOHNSTON ELIZABETH ANNE 124 

JOHNSTON KIMBERLEY ANNE 72 

JOLLY VICKIE LYNN 104 

JONES BRENDA DIANN 15, 72, 152 

JONES DONALD RAY 21, 72, 84 

JONES GLENDA 72 

JONES HERE 4 

JONES JAMES ERIC 104 

JONES JEANNINE ARLYNN 124, 154 

JONES JEFF MARSHALL 104 

JONES JOYCE ELLEN 104, 154 

JONES KELLY LOUISE 72 

JONES MICHELLE LYNN 124, 144 

JONES PATRICIA 51 

JONES REBECCA JOYCE 14, 124 

JONES RONALD STUART 73, 84 

JONES SCOTT 104 

JONES TAMMY LEE 73 

JONES TRACY CAROL 124, 154 

JORDAN JAMES FRANCIS 103 

JOSEPH SHEILA ARLENE 164 

JOSH CHARLES ANTHONY 124 

JOYCE ANGELA JEAN 104, 141 

JOYNER CHERYL GIBSON 73 

JURY MARK 176 

JURY MARSHA ELAINE 124 



KKkk 



KAHARA JENNIFER ANN 104, 137, 181 

KAISER BRENT ANDREW 124 

KAISER SHELLY LYNN 124 

KAMMERER ERICKA EVE 66, 67, 73 

KANTER HELENE LISA 124 

KANTER STEVEN JEFFREY 33, 73, 144 

KARAS DONNA MICHELLE 73 

KARCHER VICKI 51. 65, 116. 191 

KARL BRIAN KEITH 104, 151, 155 

KATEPALLI SARALA 104, 172 

KATEPALLI SHARADA 124 

KATZ MICHAEL DAVID 73 

KAUFMAN LORI ELLEN 104 

KAUPAS THOMAS RICHARD 61, 73, 141, 176 

KECK CHERYL PEYTON 104, 168, 169, 185 

KEEL CHRISTOPHER WARREN 124 

KEEN BILLIE NELSON 124 

KELLEHER KATHLEEN ANDREA 104 

KELLEY ROBERT EDWARD 104, 155 

KELLY BETSY 51. 160 

KELLY JOSEPH 104 

KELLY MARJORIE ANN 124 

KELLY PAIGE NOTTINGHAM 20, 157, 172, 173 

KEMP JR DONALD GROVER 124 

KENNEDY MICHAEL KEVIN 124 

KERNODLE TERRY LYNN 73 

KEY JAMES LEE 124 

KEY RAYMOND CHARLES 104 

KIDD RICHARD ALAN 124 

KIEHNE PAMELA JEAN 104 

KIM ALBERT BYONGUK 124, 160 

KIM STEPHANIE SUNGHE 124 

KINARD CANDACE MICHELLE 39, 73 

KING KAREN LOUISE 73 

KING VERNON 51 

KINGSBURY TROY W 124 

KIRK SUSAN HEATHER 73, 181 

KITCHEN WILLIAM BENTLEY 73, 196, 197 

KLAMERUS AMY SUSAN 104, 151 

KLINEFELTER CAROL 73 

KNICKERBOCKER KARA ELIZA 104, 139 

KOCH ROBIN CHRISTINE 124, 182 

KOEHR BRIAN 61, 66, 67, 68. 69. 70. 71. 73. 92. 193 

KOENIG ANDREW LEE 176 

KOEPPEN BARBARA LOUISE 73. 172. 173 

KOEPPEN BILL 175 

KOEPPEN STEVEN JOSEPH 124 

KOERNER SUSAN HANNELOR 104, 151, 160 

KOFROTH DARIN GLEN 73 

KOFROTH JEANINE RENEE 104 

KOFROTH YVETTE LYNN 104. 155 

KOHANEK RAMONA LEE 73 



KOHN MARLAND JOSEPH 104 

KOHN MICHAEL LEE 124 

KOLANTIS ANTONIA L 124 

KOLB DONNA 31. 51 

KOLCUM BRENDA ELIZABETH 124, 144 

KOLCUM GREGORY JENNINGS 73. 144. 146. 192, 193 

KOLODNY ADAM LAWRENCE 124 

KOMORNICK MARY 173 

KORAHAES RHONDA MARIE 104 

KOSCHEL STEVEN CRAIG 124, 155 

KOZUCH KIMBERLY 105, 154 

KRANE CHERYL LEIGH 105 

KRAVITZ NANCY LYNN 124 

KREBS ANNA LETITIA 105 

KREIDER TRACY LEE 124 

KROLL JOHN THOMAS 73 

KRONZ DIANE LEA 105 

KUBISZEWSKI MARTHA 74, 154 

KUHNEMUND KATHERINE W 155 

KUMPF MARK THOMAS 74 

KYRIAKIDES PANIKOS PARLO 146, 174. 175 



LLll 



LABARGE JOHN SEBASTIAN 124 

LABYAK LAURA JEAN 122. 124 

LABYAK THERESA ANNE 58. 59, 74, 184, 185 

LACSON AUREA Q 74 

LAFOND RENEE JEANINE 105 

LAINE JOHN 74 

LAKEY KIMBERLY JO 74 

LAMB JONATHAN CARTWRIGHT 105, 149, 151 

LANCASTER MARVIN BOYD 155 

LANCASTER SHELIA MARIE 105 

LANDERS JACK 154 

LANDERS LAURA PATRICE 105, 155 

LANE DONALD RAYE 124 

LANE JACK HAMPTON 74 

LANGHORNE JOHN ARCHER 124 

LANGHORNE PATRICIA ANNE 74 

LANKFORD JUDITH MICHELLE 74, 148, 149, 151 

LAPP JAMES MICHAEL 24 

LAPP SABRINA KAY 74 

LARKINS WILLIAM EDWARDS 124 

LARMEE DONALD HENRY 124 

LARMORE ROLAND ROBERT 105, 147, 171, 187, 197 

LASSEN CHARLES 171 

LAUCHNER CHARLES EDWARD 74 

LAUGERMAN FRANCIS 154 

LAUGHLIN KERRY ANN 74 

LAVANDOSKY KATHLEEN ANN 74 

LAVONDOSKY PAUL ANTHONY 105 

LAVONDOSKY THOMAS NICHOL 124 

LAVELY TRACEY LYNN 38, 74 

LAVENDER MICHAEL HAMILTON 125, 187 

LAW VICTORIA LYNN 74, 105, 154 

LAWLESS MICHAEL JOSEPH 105 

LAWRENCE LAURIE ,MARCELL 75, 144, 145 

LAWS BRETT ALAN 105 

LAWSON BONNIE LYNN 105, 168, 169 

LAYOLA ABELARDO V 105, 161 

LAZO MELCHOR JESUS 75 

LECCESE PAUL CAMPBELL 105 

LEE CLIFTON CHULHO 125, 158, 159 

LEE LAURA JEAN 120, 185, 194 

LEE NELSON TYER JR 105 

LEEDS MATTHEW KEVIN 75, 170, 171, 187 

LEGUM ROBIN DENISE 165 

LEHMAN CHRISTOPHER ALAN 105 

LEHMANN LURAY LYNN 125 

LENOX BRADFORD RICHARD 66, 67, 75, 146, 158, 159, 

91 

LENTZ DEBORAH DEANNE 105, 137, 147, 161, 180, 

181 

LENTZ FREDERICK CHARLES 13, 19, 58, 59, 61, 75, 89, 

166, 206 

LEONARD JENNIFER JANE 125 

LEONARD SCOTT DOUGLAS 105, 156, 160, 175 

LEVINE STEVEN GLEN 105 

LEWIS EMILY ANN 105, 154 

LEWIS WENDY REGINA 105, 155 

LIGART RODERIC EARL 125 

LILES LAURA GALE 105, 154, 155 

LINEBERRY CANDACE PAGE 154, 164 

LISNER CHARLES ALAN 105, 153, 161 

LISTER JEFFREY WAYNE 125 

LITTLE ALISA RAE 105 

LITZINGER JOHN TIMOTHY 105 



Index, '231 






Image Index 



LIVAS COSETTE DANIELLE 106. 155 

LIVAS NICOLE YVETTE 125 

LIVERMAN TERESA LYNNE 106. 154 

LIVINGSTON JENNIFER GRAC 75 

LOCH DONNA MARIE 75. 155 

LOFLIN CARRIE ANN 125 

LOFLIN TRAGI LYNNE 75 

LOHR JEFFREY ANDREW 125 

LONGMAN AMY MICHELLE 75 

LOVELACE TIMOTHY SCOTT 125. 151 

LOVELADY DAWNE RENEE 125 

LOVELADY LANCE 125 

LOVING ANNE 51 

LOWNSBORY BRADLEY JAMES 125 

LOWRANCE KEITH 196. 197 

LOW/RY MICHELLE RAE 125 

LUCE ARTHUR ALAN 106 

LUDENA ROY DAVID 125. 139. 160 

LUMPKIN BRENTON FORREST 125 

LUPER DAVID BRIAN 125 

LUTZ DAVID SCOTT 106. 137. 178. 240 

LUZZI TINA MARIE 106. 137. 216. 190. 191 

LYNCH MONA RAE 75. 154 

LYNN PATRICK THOMAS 125. 145. 154. 160 

LYNN TAMMY JEAN 125 

LYONS KELLY ANN 75 

LYONS STEVEN PATRICK 125 

LYTLE BRUCE HUNTER 75. 155 

LYTLE JAMES R 125 



MMmm 



MABRY ANDREA ROCHELLE 75. 141 

MABRY BONNIE CHRISTINE 126 

MACARAEG NOELLE CHRISTIN 127 

MACCARRONE ELLEN 52 

MACDONALD DOUGLAS LAUGHL 127 

MACK KEVIN RICHARD 106. 187 

MACKAY MICHELE ANN 127 

MACKINTIRE JULIE LEE 127 

MADISON DAWN 75. 144. 154. 176 

MADISON WILLIAM BRYANT 106 

MAGNO DINNA FILOTEO 127 

MAHER MAUREEN DORINDA 127. 160. 221 

MAIO KIM ANN 106 

MAMPLATA CAESAR G 127. 160 

MANDEL JEFFREY BRIAN 127 

MANGOSING MARLENE ELEANO 127. 161 

MANN CYNTHIA MARIE 106 

MANN LAURA JEAN 127 

MANNING KAREN LEE 75. 154. 155 

MANTTA BRENDA LYNN 75 

MARCHESANI PETER JAMES 127 

MARCHMAN SHANNON 127 

MARCHMAN SHAWN KATHLEEN 151 

MARCINKO KATHY ANN 75 

MARCUM KEVIN ROBERT 36 

MARKHAM MICHELLE LEIGH 106. 145. 149 

MARKLAND ROBIN ANN 127 

MARKOWITZ JACOB BENJAMIN 127 

MARKS TIMOTHY CHARLES 76 

MARSH ROBERT SEAN 76. 156, 176 

MARSHALL DEBRA ANN 76 

MARTIN APRIL LYNN 106. 155 

MARTIN E GEOFFREY 127 

MARTIN JANET MARIE 76. 172. 184. 185 

MARTIN JOHN ALLAN 127 

MARTIN KARA LYNN 127 

MARTIN LISA JANE 68. 69. 76. 81. 137. 146 

MARTIN ROBERT EDWARD 76 

MARTIN STEPHEN KEITH 106. 196. 197 

MARTIN TARA IRENE 106 

MARTINEAU KIM ANN 127 

MARTINEZ JOHN DAVID 106 

MASON JAMES RUTLEDGE 125. 158 

MASON JOHN PAUL 125 

MASON JURELL ANITA 76, 151, 154 

MASON MRS 52 

MATELING ALANA JUNE 14. 76, 154. 90 

MATNEY REBECCA GAAR 125. 144. 161 

MATTER JAMES EDWARD 125. 155 

MATTESON ANITA 35. 52 

MATTHEWS ANITA MARIE 125 

MATTHFWS BRIAN LEE 76 

MATTHrwS f I IZABETH ELLEN 76 

MATTHFWS KIMBKRLY ANN 106 

MATTHEWS SUSAN WYATT 76, 146 

MATTSON KIMBERLY ANNE 106 



MATUCK MICHELLE LEIGH 106. 160 

MATUCK TAMERA LYNNE 125. 160 

MATYAS ALAN EDWARD 76 

MAULL WILLIAM 22. 76. 155 

MAUNEY MICHELE DENISE 19. 76 

MAXWELL HEATHER A 125 

MAY KRISTEN LYNNE 106. 137. 147. 161. 180. 181 

MAYNARD KIMBERLY ANN 106 

MAYNES JON LEWIS 125 

MAYO DANA LOUISE 76 

MAYO GINGER DYAN 106 

MCAFEE KYLE ELLIOTT 125 

MCALEA SCOTT 106 

MCANDREWS ROBERT W 77. 176. 183. 26 

MCBRIDE CARYN J 106. 160 

MCBRIDE DANA LYNN 40. 77. 160 

MCBRIDE RYAN KEITH 125 

MCCABE KAREN ELIZABETH 125. 185 

MCCABE KATHLEEN MARY 125. 185. 194 

MCCLAIN LORIE LYNN 77 

McCLAIN PHYLLIS 52. 201 

MCCLEAF STEVEN DOUGLAS 106 

MCCLENNY DAVID WADE 77 

MCCONNELL ROBIN MICHELLE 125 

MCCOY GEORGE EDWARD 106 

MCCOY LORI KAYE 106. 154 

MCDANIEL PAMELA FAYE 77. 154 

MCDONNELL DUANE DAVID 77 

MCDONNELL ERIC ANDREW 125 

MCDUFFIE HAROLD DEWIT II 125 

MCFEELY COLLEEN MARIE 172 

MCFEELY MARY KATHLEEN 172 

MCGARITY MARK ALAN 126. 170. 171 

McGEE MIKE 62, 188 

MCGLONE GREGORY LAMONT 126 

MCGLONE SHEILA RENEE 77 

McGRATH FRANK 52. 172. 173 

MCGRATH SEAN PATRICK 106. 155. 215 

MCGREGOR MATTHEW ROBERT 126 

MCGUIRE DIANE MARIE 126. 161 

MCINTYRE JENNIFER ANN 106. 149. 160 

MCLAUGHLIN CHRISTOPHER J 176 

MCLAUGHLIN DAVID JOSEPH 106 

MCLAUGHLIN JOHN J JR 106. 176 

MCLAUGHLIN LAURA ANN 116. 117. 126. 185 

MCMAKIN SHANNON KIRK 126 

McNElL JOYCE 52 

MCNULTY JOSEPH BERNARD 126. 161 

MCPARTLAND HEATHER KRIST 77. 155 

MCPHERSON PATRICK TROY 106 

MCVEY WENDY ANN 126. 185 

MEAKIN KAREN ANNE 77 

MEEHAN MARY TERESA 106. 176, 181 

MELCHERS JOHN ANTHONY 106 

MELLON PATRICIA K 155 

MELNIKOFF MICHAEL M 106 

MELTON PATRICIA 1 YNN 106 

MENIA CHRISTOPHER RONALD 106 

MERCURIO ANTHONY JOSEPH 77 

MESSIER THOMAS ERNEST 126 

MEYER DALE ALLEN JR 77 

MICHAEL DAVID J 126. 158 

MIDDLETON GARY LEE 126 

MIDGETT CINDY LYNN 106 

MILES JOHN 176 

MILES SCEMEARL JEANNE 106, 144, 160 

MILLER AMY LYNN 126 

MILLER ANDREW PAUL 106 

MILLER ANNA KAREN 126 

MIllFR CAROIE BETH 126. 163. 182 

MILLER GREG CONRAD 126 

MILLER HORACE JACK 77 

MIllER JAMES JOSEPH 77. 151. 155. 176 

MILLFR KIMBERLY 106. 164 

MILLER MAMA LOUISE 7. 77. 107. 151 

Mil 1 ER MICHAEL CHRISTIAN 126 

Mil I FR STEVEN JAMES 77. 154 

Mil I FR SUSAN F 107 

MILLER TIMOTHY ALAN 126 

MILLHOUSE PAMELA JANE 126. 154 

MILLIKFN BRIAN SHANE 

MILIIKFN JESS ERIK 126 

MILLS SCOTT DAI E 107. 183 

MITCHFll Al FRED THOMAS 107 

MITCHFI I JOHN 40, 82 

MIT( HI 1 1 KAREN I YNN 77 

MI/AI MICHALl 1 RNEST 126 

MOHAP BLCKY ANN 77. 146. 147. 190 

MOORE Ell/ABI IH HENTLEY 126 



MOORE FELISICIA MARTEL 126 

MOORE JOHN WORTH 77 

MOORE JR EG WILLIAM 126 

MOORE KATHLEEN 172 

MOORE MARK STEVEN 77 

MOORE ROBERT WAYNE 107. 160 

MOORE SHERAN NELL 126. 151 

MOORE THOMAS MITHCELL 126. 187 

MORAN JANE 52. 164 

MOREAN THERESA A 126 

MORECOCK SABINE STEFANIE 107. 155 

MORGAN DAVID JUDE 107 

MORGAN JOHN MICHAEL 107 

MORGAN JULIE LYNN 78. 154 

MORGAN THOMAS JACKSON JR 61. 68, 69. 78. 79. 

176. 177, 187. 91. 92 

MORRIS BRIAN KEITH 36, 78, 114, 146. 161 

MORRIS DOUG 178. 179 

MORRIS MICHAEL SCOTT 75. 78. 107. 170. 171. 187. 

188. 147 

MORRIS MICHELLE DELAINE 21, 176 

MORRISON CHARLES DAVID 126 

MORRISON KATHERINE L 107 

MORRISON LAUREN 126. 154 

MORRISON RODNEY 78 

MORROW DR 188 

MORSE BRIAN SCOTT 126 

MORSE JENNIFER IRENE 126 

MORSE KRISTINE KAY 107 

MORTON CATHY DELYNN 78 

MOSS WAYNE STEVEN 78 

MOSTELLER JOHN PAUL 126 

MOTE ANGELA PAGE 78 

MOTE STEVE 178. 179 

MOTLEY JOYCE LYNN 78 

MOTLEY KARI DAWN 78 

MOTT THEODORE GRANT 107. 189 

MOYER GARY CHRISTOPHER 126 

MUELLER KATHIFEN COLLINS 78 

MULLALY EILEEN 116, 117. 126. 143 

MUNGO JUAN MARCEL 126. 193 

MURDEN TRACIE MICHELLE 126 

MORPHY JAMES MICHAEL 39 

MURPHY JENNIFER 126 

MUSE WILLIAM RONALD 78 

MUSICH STACY MICHELLE 108 

MYERS LESLIE JEANNE 108 

MYERS VALERIE ANN 126. 160 



NNnn 



NACHMAN BRAD JOSEPH 78. 138. 139. 161 

NAPOLES JOANNE S 108 

NASHWINTER DAWN RENEE 108 

NAUJOKS MICHELE 78 

NELSON BRIAN 176. 177 

NELSON KELLY 176. 177 

NELSON KIMBERLY JEAN 176. 177 

NESTE CAROL I 108 

NEWBOLD SUSAN TOWNSHEND 127 

NEWBY 1 AURA KATHLEEN 127 

NEWBY 1 EWIS 78, 157 

NEWTON RAYMOND BARNARD 108 

NEWTON RONALD CHRISTOPHER 127. 145 

NG JERRY JAMES 127 

NICELY GLENN SCOTT 78 

NICELY NICOLE ELVA 78 

NICHAEL STEPHEN HAROLD 78 

NICHOLS GEORGE DOUGLAS 108 

NICHOLSON CARL FREDERICK 108 

NIMMO IRIS 29. 37. 53 

NIXON I EL A MARIE 78 

NIXON MICHAEL ANGEl O 127 

NOBLES STEPHANIE JEAN 108 

NOBUCK DUANE HOLDEN 127 

NORMAN CHRISTINE 1 ORRAIN 127 

NOWIAND CARYN CYNTHIA 108, 176 



OOoo 



OBERG EVA KARIN M 108. 137. 144. 9. 160 

OCAMPO MARICHU SEBASTIAN 127. 139. 154 

OCTAVO .JOSI PH MARK 78 

OCTAVO MARIA llll Rl SA 108, 144. 161. 176 

ODELL WILLIAM H 127 

ODIETUS MATTHEW LAWRENCE 108 



232 /Index 



^ 



ODOM BARRY E 79 

OGLESBY AMANDA 127, 161 

OHARA MICHAEL 61, 79, 187, 189 

OLAH JOHN CALVIN 108 

OLAH SEAN DOUGLAS 137 

OLIVER CHRISTOPHER N 127 

OLIVER THOMAS EDWARD 79 

OLIVERIO ELIZABETH 53 

OLMSTEAD ROBIN DENISE 79 

OMBERG PETER DENNEDY 127 

OMEAD DAVID 127 

OMEARA DAVID ANTHONY 

ONEAL LORRIE ANN 79 

O'NEIL JIM 178, 179 

O'NEIL SEAN 127 

ONKS ASHLEY LYNN 79, 144 

ORLANDO ANTHONY PAUL 127 

ORTEGA TERESITA TEODORO 68, 69, 79, 136, 146, 

215, 237 

ORTEGA VENER JUN 108 

ORTS ANDREW JEFEREY 108 

ORTS SANDRA LYNN 108 

OSBORNE CAROL 40, 41, 53, 168, 169 

OSBORNE MICHAEL KEW 127 

OSBURN RODNEY S 108 

OSTBERG JENNA LISA 127 

OTT LISA MARCEl^ 108 

OWEN JAMES 108 

OWENS DARRIN CLAGUE 108 

OWENS STEPHEN EDWARD 127 



PPPP 



PACE, BETTY 53 

PACIFICO NANCY OLINDA 79 

PADILLA RANDY P 128 

PAGE SHEILA DARLENE 108 

PAINTER I VNr-^ DFNISF 128 

PALERMO CATHERINE H 108 

PALLER MICHAEL TROY 108 

PALLETT CHARLENE LINAE 79, 141, 157 

PALMER DAVID PATRICK 128 

PANZARELLA FRANK 79 

PAPPAS PAMELA JANE 79 

PARAGAS MELODY 79, 144, 145. 160 

PARENTEAU MARGARET MARIE 79 

PARHAM ROBERT 36, 53 

PARK WILLIAM PAUL 79 

PARKER ANN 53, 150 

PARKER DAVID ALLEN 108, 153 

PARKER STEVE 53, 55 

PARRISH ROBERT LEE 79 

PASCHALL DOGGLAS 53 

PASCUAL PERRY MUNOZ 128, 144. 159 

PATTERSON DEBORAH LYNN 128 

PATTERSON ERIC 81 

PATTERSON GREGORY DEAN 109 

PATTERSON KIMBERLY RENEE 128 

PATTERSON WILLIAM P 109 

PEARSON DEBBIE 168, 169 

PEARSON MARY DOROTHY 109, 154 

PEELE JAMES ADRIAN 109 

PELINA EDWARD HIPOS 128 

PELL NANCY 53, 57 

PELLINGRA ANTHONY 128 

PELLINGRA MARY DIANE 109, 149 

PENDLETON ELIZABETH SCOT 22, 109. 160, 176, 194 

PENNINGTON DANIEL ALLAN 109 

PENSYL DAVID CLARK 81 

PERKINS JOY LYNN 109 

PERMENTER ELIZABETH ANNE 128 

PERMENTER JEFFREY L 154, 155, 181 

PERREAGLT VALERIE ANN 128 

PERROTTA ASHLIE M 81, 155 

PERRY JEFFREY JOHN 109, 158, 159, 160 

PERRY WENDY LORENE 128 

PESTER KAREN MARIE 109 

PETERS STEVEN WAYNE 147, 189 

PETERSON RENA 31, 53 

PETRAOSKIS NICOLE MARIE 155, 129 

PETROFF ANN 53, 161 

PETRY CLAYTON JAMES 109, 176 

PETTRUNY TERESA ANN 81, 161 

PEZZELLA MARK CHRISTOPHE 128 

PHELPS GENE R JR 109 

PHELPS GEORGE MARTIN JR 81, 146, 160 

PHELPS GERALD 54, 57, 145 

PHILBRICK GEORGE H 111 81 

PHILLIPS AMY JOANNE 109 

PHILLIPS FORREST 109 

PHILLIPS MICHAEL LAWRENCE 128 

PICARDO ANTHONY ROY 128 

PICCILO GEORGE 31, 54. 182 

PICCILO LISETTE 54, 177 

PIERCE MELISSA ANNE 128 

PIERCE RANDALL SCOTT 128 

PIERCE REED CAMERON 128 



PIERCE RYAN Wll I lAM 81 

PIERCE STACEY LANG 8 1 , 82 

PIERSON STEVEN CORBETT 109, 175 

PINDUR NANCY 31, 54, 160 

PINEDA ARISTOTLE TAYOG 128 

PINEDA MARC DANIEI 109 

PITT Fl I FN 54 

PITTS MICHAEL THOMAS 81 

PIVER CYNTHIA LEE 81, 151 

PLACIDES ELISA EPI 128, 145 

PLEASANTS RUTH 54 

POCOCK KAREN 51. 81. 84. 145. 146, 147. 161. 190 

POCOCK KATHRYN 61. Rl, 84. 145. 146. 147. 161. 190 

POFF VI 54 

POGORZELSKI HENRY MARK 128. 157. 183 

POHLY STEVEN GLEN 81 

POINDEXTER KATHERINE 54 

POLFUS EDWARD JOSEPH 109, 154 

PONDER TAMARA LYNN 81, 147. 180, 181. 194 

PONTI RICHARD 51, 54, 192, 193 

PONTILLO JO ANNE 81, 160 

POPE CHRISTOPHER KEVIN 109, 141 

POPE SUSAN 168, 169 

POPPERWILL LISA MARIE 81, 172 

PORTER ERNEST VINCENT 81 

PORTER NANCY LYNNE 128 

PORTER RICHMOND VINCENT 108 

PORTERFIELD CHRISTINE E 109, 155 

POST MIKE 109 

POTTS JAMES MICHAEL 109 

POTTS ROBERT ALLEN 81 

POWELL CAROLYN 28, 54 

POWELL ELLEN 54 

POWELL NANCY 128 

POWER CAROLINE PAGE 128 

PRESLEY TANYA KATHLEEN 109, 155 

PRESTON VANESSA DOROTHY 128 

PRIBUTSKY DAVID MARK 128 

PRICE KIMBERLY GAYLE 128 

PRICENSKI DAVID JOSEPH 128 

PRIMM TIFFANY ALICE 81, 155, 176, 184, 185 

PRINCE CHRISTINE MARIE 128 

PRINCE MICHAEL STEVEN 81 

PRINCE RACHAEL DEBRA 109 

PRINCE STACEY ANNE 110, 156 

PROCTOR BRIAN MICHAEL 154 

PROCTOR LAWRENCE 81 

PROCTOR THOMAS MICHAEL 110 

PROPSTER CAROLE RENEE 110 

PRZYBYL SEAN 1 10, 155 

PUNDT BRYAN WARD 1 10 

PURDHAM ALDON 166 



QQqq 



QUIBAN GLENN MERCADO 81 
QUILLIN SUZANNE 128, 151 
QUINLAN DAMIENNE REED 128 
QUINN DEBORAH ANNE 128 
QUINTON MARK SHANNON 110 
QUINTON SARAH SINCLAIR 40 



RRrr 



RABIDOUX BRENDA ANN 14. 25. 81 

RABIDOUX KAREN LYN 110. 147. 164. 168, 169 

RADIGAN STEVEN MATTHEW 110 

RAITER SUSANNE IRENE 128 

RALEIGH DONNA MARIE 81 

RALPH STEVEN AMOS 81 

RAMEY BLAINE AUBREY 128 

RAMSEY ARTHUR PATRICK 

RAMSEY TROY DAREL 81, 187, 91 

RANDOLPH KATHERINE D 81 

RANKIN ELEANOR DALE 151 

RANKIN SHELLEY NADINE 128 

RAPCAVAGE MICHELLE 128 

RAPCAVAGE SUZANNE 81, 147, 164, 190, 191 

RARY MARY J 128 

RAVIZZA DEAN MICHAEL 128 

RAVIZZA MICHELLE ANN 81 

RAVON STEVIE 129 

RAWLINS VIRGIL ALLEN 129 

RAY CATHERINE ALICE 81 

RAY THERESA JOSEPHINE 110 

RAYBURN JAMES MICHAEL 110, 156 

RAYNOR JAMES WILLIAM 110 

READE CARMEN 54, 134 

REDAVID CATHRYN GAYLE 129 

REDAVID RENEE LYNN 110 

REECE ROBERT EDWARD 129, 187 

REGA CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM 81 

REID DAVID WILLIAM 129 

REID HERMAN 129, 193, 194 

REID KELVIN ALPHONSO 110 

REID ROY 48, 54 



REILLY KATY 54 

REINER KURTIS DEAN 110 

REITELBACH PAUL ALLAN 81, 144. 156 

REITER RONALD RUSSELL 110 

REMY GREGORY MICHAEL 110. 176. 183 

RETIKIS ERNEST SISCAR 36. 129 

RETTIE CAROL LINDSAY 81, 154 

REUSCH LINDA 54. 59. 64 

REYES REGINA KAY 110 

REYNOLDS SHERRI RAE 129 

REZAS MARK STEPHEN 110 

REZAS PETER JOHN I 10 

RHODE JUDSON CYRUS 81, 175, 189 

RHODES DANIEL 81, 193 

RHODES DONALD 81, 155, 187, 27 

RICE BETHANY DIANE 129 

RICH KAREN JEAN 129 

RICHARD MARTIN EUGENE 129 

RICHARDS JOHN KING 110 

RICHARDSON BETH MARIE 129. 159 

RICHARDSON LYNDA 82. 154 

RIDDELL STEPHANIE ANN 110 

RIDDLE RODNEY FRANCIS 110. 154 

RIDDLE TIMOTHY NORMAN 82 

RIEDEL TRACEY ANN 129 

RIFFLE CALIN JOAN 129. 155 

RILEY PARRISH LYNN 82. 148, 149 

RINGER DONNA MARIE 129 

RIORDON KEVIN EDWARD 110 

RITGER LYNN MARCUS 110. 160 

RITTER CAROLYN WILSON 82 

RITTER JANET 54 

RITTER JIM 54. 188 

RIVERA JOSEPH FRANCIS 82. 161 

RIVETTE SHEILA DAWN 110. 182 

ROBERTS CHRISTOPHER MORG 129 

ROBERTS JAMES MYLOR 82. 154 

ROBERTSON BETH LYNN 7. 82, 159 

ROBERTSON MRS, 159 

ROBINSON BRYAN HEATH 129 

ROBINSON CURTIS ALLEN 82 

ROBNETT CELIA 54, 136, 237 

RODGERS WENDY A 82, 155 

RODOMSKY JUDY 110 

ROGERS JEFFREY SCOTT 82 

ROGERS JESSICA ANN 82 

ROGERS KRISTIN MONTAREE 129 

ROGERS MICHELLE ANN 110 

ROGERS TIMOTHY MICHAEL 82 

ROGERSON RON 54 

ROLLINS CHRISTOPHER R 110, 154 

ROME DARYL 176 

ROMINE STEPHANIE JANE 82 

ROMINE STEPHEN JAMES 129 

RONDERO LENOA ANN 129, 161 

ROOLE ARTHUR 1 10 

ROSE RICHARD JOHN 110 

ROSSI REGINA MARIE 82, 149, 151, 90 

ROUNTREE SHIRLEY 46 

ROUSE JEFFREY T 82, 159 

ROY JOHN CHRISTOPHER 129 

ROYSTER CANDACE EUGENIA 129, 193 

ROYSTER CARL MORRIS 176 

ROYSTER C C 110 

ROZOS DEBORAH DENISE 14, 129 

RUBIN MICHELLE LINDA 129, 159 

RUCHELMAN CHARLES MICHAEL 129 

RUDIGER STACEY LYNN 82, 154 

RUIZ LISETTE MARIE 129 

RUMORE MICHAEL JAMES 129, 159 

RUMPF TRACY WARD 111 

RUPPE SHARON LYNN 129 

RUPPE SUSAN RENEE 129 

RUSSELL ALTON BRYCE 82, 111, 154 

RUSSELL KENNETH T 

RUSTCHAK DANIEL F II 82 

RUTLEDGE GERALD GLENN 129 

RUTT MARY K 21, 83, 151, 155 

RYAN DAVID IAN 111, 176, 182, 183 



SSss 



SADLER STACIA ANN 129 
SADLER TERRI RENEE 129 
SALANG SALBERT JUNSAY 129 
SALMON AMY YVONNE 110, 194 
SALMON JEFFREY PAUL 111, 160 
SALMONS APULETTA 83 
SAMMONS NADIA LYDIA 155 
SANDERLIN ROBIN JOYCE 111, 161 
SANDLER SAMUEL 111 
SANDY KEVIN 112 
SANFORD KEVIN DWAYNE 83 
SANOBA CINDY 37, 55, 154 
SANTAMARIA NANCY OBISPO 83, 154 
SANTAMARIA ROBERT 111, 156 
SATCHWELL MICHAEL FENNER 154 



Index/233 



SATTERFIELD MARK ALAN 111. 157 

SAVAGE MECHILLE LEE 129. 155 

SAVAGE ROBERT EARL 1 1 1 

SAWNING KIMBERLY DAWN 129 

SAWYER TRINA KAYE 128 

SAYLOR KIMBERLY ANN 130 

SCAGLIONE MARY ANN 83. 176. 185 

SCHELL JOAN LEE 111. 147. 180. 181 

SCHENCK PETER THOMAS 83 

SCHERRER JOAN ELIZABETH 83 

SCHMON LISA MARIE 83. 113 

SCHNEIDER ANN DILLARD 111 

SCHNEIDER KRISTEN LEE 111. 144. 194 

SCHOBER CHANCE ALLYN 111. 176 

SCHORR ERIC MICHAEL 111. 175 

SCHGMBRECHT DANIEL JOSEPH 130. 8 

SCHtJMBRECHT JOSEPHINE C 1 1 1 

SCHUSTER ANN 1 1 1 

SCHWARTZTRAUBER ANTHONY 130. 154 

SCHWARTZTRAOBER RONALD L 111. 154. 161. 176 

SCOTT CRAIG GLENN 130 

SCOTT ELIZABETH ANN 130 

SCOTT JENNIFER 172 

SCOTT KAREN SUZANNE 130 

SCOTT MICHELE RENEE 111. 154 

SCOTT RONALD 55. 152 

SCOTT THOMAS WINFIELD 111. 160 

SCOTT TRACEY SULLIVAN 33. 151. 158 

SCOTT VIRGINIA MAY 83. 181 

SEELY SARAH 55. 141 

SEGOVIA ANGELA 111. 154 

SEIBOLD MITZI 130. 154 

SEKERES III STEPHEN 83. 156 

SELDEN CHARITA LYNN 130 

SELIGMAN MICHAEL JOSEPH 1 1 1 

SELL CHRISTINE ANNE 16. 17. 21. 111. 134. 149 

SHANK TRACY ALYS 130 

SHANON III ROBERT ALLEN 111 

SHAPIRO ERIC F 130 

SHAPIRO LESLIE BETH 40. 64. 83 

SHARE BARRIE TAMARA 83 

SHARP KRISTIN KAY 83 

SHARPE SUSAN FRYE 83 

SHAW J BRADLEY 5. 68, 69. 79, 83, 136. 137, 145. 215, 

220 

SHEPPARD JENNIFER LYNN 130 

SHERWOOD BRIAN 115 

SHERWOOD BRYAN SCOT 175 

SHIELDS TRACY ALLISON 130 

SHIMANDLE GREGG ALLEN 83 

SHIRLEY ANASTASIA Mill 

SHOOP ERIC 159 

SHOURDS BARBARA LYNN 111, 154 

SHOWS LYDIA KATHRYN 112. 145 

SHULTS MARK N 112 

SIEBERT FRANCES DEBRA 130 

SIEBERT RICHARD LYNN 83 

SIFFORD SAM WAYNE 130 

SIGLER PATRICK 130 

SILER JEAN 57 

SILVA MICHELE RENE 130 

SIMMONS DAVID NELSON 83 

SIMMONS JULIE RENEE 130, 151 

SIMON STEPHANIE YVETTE 154 

SIMONS LISA ANN 83 

SINGSON JOEL 130 

SINK FRANCIS LEROY 83. 178 

SINSABAUGH JOHN MICHAEL 83 

SKELENGER MICHELLE C 84 

SKOLNICK CURTIS MARC 112 

SKOTTECAARD PAMELA JANE 130 

SKOTTEGAARD R NICOLAS 112 

SKRAPITS III STEPHEN J 16, 21, 84. 151 

SLAGLE KAREN GERMAINE 84 

SLAGLE MONIQUE ANTOINETE 130 

SLATER MICHAEL DANIEL 112 

SLAUGHTER ANNE RANDOLPH 116, 117, 130. 162, 

184. 185, 90, 92 

SLAUGHTER SUSAN HUNTER 14,64,84, 146, 160, 181 

SLAYTON KAROLYN KRISTYAN 112 

SLONE ADAM 166 

SMALL RHONDA HILDA 112 

SMITH AMY LYNN 130 

SMITH ANDREW 176 

SMITH BERNARD KENT 

SMITH CHRISTOPHER M 84 

SMITH GREG 166 

SMITH HEATHFR ELIZABETH 112 

SMITH JAMES PATRICK 112 

SMITH JONATHAN ODELL 84. 154 

SMITH JOSEPH IRVING 130. 176 

SMITH KELl Y ANN 130 

SMITH LORENZO ALEXIS 112 

SMITH TRACY ELIZABETH 84 

SMITH WANDA 57 

SMITH WINIFRFD ALLISON 130 

SMOCK PATRICIA ANN 130 

SNAPP DAVID BRADLEY 1 12 

SNOW CHERYL LYNNE 130 



SNUKIS MICHELE LYNN 130 

SNYDER DARRIN STANLEY 112 

SOADY TODD ELLIOTT 130 

SOELBERG RICHARD DEAN 130 

SOKOLINSKY DENISE 84. 172. 173 

SOKOLINSKY MARK 84. 174. 175, 197 

SORENSON NANCY 130 

SPADE PATRICIA FAYE 131. 154 

SPAIN DAPHNE JO 131, 154 

SPAIN JAREN EARL 84 

SPARKS ROMONA MEREDITH 112 

SPEAR WILLIAM RUSSELL 112 

SPEARMAN CHARLES EDWARD 131 

SPEARMAN DEVON LYNN 84. 155 

SPEARS LOR! LYNN 112. 141 

SPEELMAN WILLIAM EDWARD 84 

SPEIGHT TAMMY LYNN 84. 161 

SPENCE DEBORAH E 112 

SPILKA JUDITH DIANE 112 

SPILKA LISA ANN 131. 160 

SPITALNEY MICHAEL JOEL 94, 95, 112. 161 

SPIVA BRUCE 40. 84. 89, 148. 149. 150. 151. 158. 159. 

91. 92, 206 

SPIVAK BETHANY MICHELLE 112 

SPRAGUE ANNA ELIZABETH 131 

SPRAGUE JEFFREY LAWRENCE 131. 193 

SPRINGER JILL SHANNON 151 

SPRINGER JODI MARIE 85, 131 

SPROUL JOHN WELCH 1 12 

SPRUILL LISA ANN 81, 85. 137, 160 

SPRUILL TRACY MARLO 131 

SPRY SANDRA DEE 

SQUIRES KEVIN WAYNE 85 

STAEHLING KAREY LYNN 131 

STAFF GRANTLAND SMITH 13. 85 

STAFFORD HENRY WILSON 85 

STAMPLEY WENDY TREVOR 112. 119, 149 

STANKUS JIM 36, 57 

STANLEY DAVID OVERTON 112 

STANULIS LAURA ELLEN 85. 149 

STARLING AARON DAVID 112 

STATON ANITA LOUISE 85 

STAUB DAVID W 131 

STEMPLE JOHN ROLAND 85 

STPHENS BRADLEY CLAY 131 

STEPHENS GREGORY MARK 131 

STEPHENSON JOHNNY 131 

STEPHENSON MARY BETH 113 

STEPNICK ANDREA 85. 220 

STEWART MARCUS PAUL 131 

STEWART SHARON LYNETTE 85 

ST LAURENT NEIL 29. 57 

STODDART CHRISTINE L 131, 151 

STOKES KEITH EDWARD 131 

STOKEY JANE 57 

STONE KEVIN MICHAEL 85 

STONE RAYMOND LOUIS 85. 99, 174. 175 

STORM V WILLIAM WILLIS 131. 187 

STRADER JOHN CHARLES 113 

STRANGE CHERYL ANN 79. 85, 149, 151 

STRANGE JONI 131 

STRAPEC STEPHEN ANDREW 131 

STRAWN KENNETH LEE 131 

STRICKLAND DIANA LYNN 85 

STRICKLAND MARVIN LEE 85, 176 

STROUP ERIC WILSON 85, 89, 205 

STUBBS DAVID GREGORY 131, 145 

STUBBS TANYA LINN 113, 155 

SULLIVAN DOREEN ELIZABETH 85. 164 

SUMNER DEBORAH JEAN 85 

SUNG JIMMY CHIYUN 131. 137 

SURLES ROBERT BALLARD 131 

SUTHERLAND PAUL BRANDON 26. 85 

SUTTON DONNA MARIE 113 

SUTTON III JAMES THOMAS 85 

SVAIB TIMOTHY ANDREW 113 

SVEDBERG INGRID LOUISE 85, 15 

SWAIN CYNTHIA ANN 85 

SWANBERG JULIET ESTHER 113, 132 

SWANNER DONNA 113 

SWARTZ HOWARD BERNARD 85. 166 

SWARTZ KAY 57 

SWARTZENTRUBER MERLIN 50. 61. 86. 142, 147. 187, 

189, 210, 196, 197 

SWEAR DENISE RENE 131 

SWYERS JEFFREY MICHAEL 86 

SYDOW JERRY 36. 57. 156. 200 

SYFRETT KEVIN NATHANIAL 113 

SYKES JEFFREY ALAN 25, 86 

SZARONOS BRIAN DOUGLAS 131, 156 



TTtt 



194 



145 



TATE DEBRA GAYLE 86 

TATE PAMELA MICHELLE 131 

TATE TROY LANE 113 

TATEM DEBBIE 131 

TATEM JR MARSHALL WORTH 113, 154 

TAYLOR DAWN M 113 

TAYLOR ERIC QUENTIN 86, 207 

TAYLOR KENNETH ROSS 113. 155 

TAYLOR ROBIN LEIGH 131, 151 

TAYLOR SANDRA EILEEN 86. 154 

TEACH BARRIE MELISSA 131. 160 

TEEGARDEN TIMOTHY MILTON 113 

TENNIS RICHARD ROBERT 86 

TERRAY BETH ANN 113 

TEW DENISE MARIE 86 

TEWEY LAWRENCE PAUL 131 

THARRINGTON BARRETT 57, 95 

THERIAULT KIMBERLY JANE 113, 

THIBAULT SEAN GARY 131 

THOMAS LORI LEE 86 

THOMPSON DENNIS TRACEY 113 

THOMPSON DICK 57 

THOMPSON HEATHER SUSAN 131. 

THOMPSON KAREN 131 

THOMPSON MARK ALLEN 86 

THOMPSON MATTHEW JAMES 61, 86, 136. 144, 145. 

162. 189. 215, 90. 92. 220, 237 

THOMPSON MAUREEN THERESE 113. 137, 172 

THORNTON ADRIANE ARLEENE 113 

THORfSTON AMINDA IRENE 131 

THOUSAND JOHN EDWARD 131 

TIGNOR CARLTON BALTIMORE 113, 161 

TILT ELIZABETH ELLEN 41, 86 

TINCHER JOHN PERRY I 13 

TINKLER JOSEPH SIDNEY 22, 37. 86. 147. 171, 187 

TODD RICHELE ANNE 131 

TODESCO VALERIE SUZANE 86, 151, 155. 42 

TOIDA JULIUS KENJI 131. 160 

TOLSON MICHAEL WAYNE 131 

TOMESCH MARY ROSE 113, 155 

TONKOVICH DAVID J 1 13 

TOSI MELISSA ANN 113. 155 

TOWNSEND CHRISTOPHER R 113. 

TOXEY DANA RENE 154 

TRAIL JOSEPH RAYMOND 86 

TRANSEAU CINDY LEE 113 

TRAUB CHARLES 57 

TRETHEWEY KRISTIE ROBIN 131, 

TRIPP JOHN PATRICK 131 

TRUEBLOOD MATHEW COURTNE 86 

TURLEY JERRY WAYNE JR 113 

TURLINGTON GARY DOUGLAS 113 

TURNER CYNTHIA MARIE 114 

TURNER GERALD EDWARD 86 

TURNER PEGGIE LEIGH 86, 144, 146. 160 

TURNER TRACYE LYNN 131. 159 

TWEEDY EDWARD LEE 114 

TWIDDY DOUGLAS 1 14 

TYNES JAMES E JR 131, 152 



144 



238 



GUuu 



UNDERHILL LAURIE ANNE 132 
URBEN KINDER ELIZABETH 114 
URMANN EILEEN M 86, 161 
UTTER ELLEN LEE 114 
UTTER SHARON KAY 86 
UTTER SHIRLEY ANNE 86 
UYHELYI RICHARD FMII 132 



VVvv 



VAIDEN PAULA MICHLlLt 13^, 160 

VALADE JENNIFER C 87, 145. 160 

VALENTINE TAMMY M 114, 154 

VAN OEKEL JEROME 132 

VAN SAUN DEBORAH 132 

VANDENOUWEELEN NANCY 87, 185 

VANDERWELEON NANCY 176 

VANFOSSEN TIMOTHY COREY 87 

VASQUEZ ANETE 132, 137 

VAUGHAN GEORGE BRIAN 174, 175 

VAUGHAN SHANNON LEE 132 

VERNON DAVID 114 

VERSPRIllE GEORGE 57. 163. 177, 187, 188 

VICK PATRICK RYAN I 14 

VIDOS HUGH CHRISTOPHER 160 

VIERNES CHRISTINE 132 

VINSON IRMA 8, 57 

VOELKEl RONALD JOSEPH 114 

VOMVOURAS DIMITRI 87 



TADEO TROY ANDREW 113. 197 
TAFE NANCY 57 
TAGGART FT IZABETH ANN 131 
TANN MORTIMER ASHTON 86 



WWww 



WADE SANDRA LEE 114 



?M'\ndnx 



Image Index 



WALCK STEPHEM MK HAt I I V? 

WALES CAROL ANNE 132 

WALKER ANDREW CHARLES 51. 132 

WALKER ANN HATHAWAY 48. 87. 155 

WALKER CHERYL 57. 166. 180 

WALKER DAVID LOUIS 25. 84. 137. 149. 220 

WALKER DONALD EDWARD 25. 84 

WALKER JAMIE I 14 

WALKER KELLEY LYNNE 181 

WALKER MICHAEL WELLS 239 

WALL WILLIAM CHARLES 132 

WALLACE SHERI 132 

WALLACE THOMAS LEE 132 

WALLIN JEAN 57 

WALSH CHRISTOPHER P 87 

WALSH RICHARD EUGENE 132 

WALSH SEAN MICHAEL 87 

WALTER MICHELLE JOAN 114. 149. 158. 159. 160 

WALTERS ALLEN LEE 114 

WALTON DANA EDEMY 132. 147. 164. 190 

WALTON SaSAN HALL 87. 147, 172. 184. 185. 194.91. 

92. 195 

WALTZ JENNY 176 

WALTZ WILLIAM JOHN 87, 132 

WANZONG DEBRA LANE 145. 158. 160 

WANZONG KATHLEEN LYNN 68. 69. 87. 139, 5, 146 

WARANCH AMY LYNN 114, 160 

WARD III WILLIAM EDWIN 87. 160 

WARD JODI LYNN 114 

WARD KENNETH CHARLES 88 

WARD ROBERT TROY 88 

WARD SUSAN MARIE 132 

WARSHAW JULIE 88, 141, 154 

WASHINGTON DEBRA RENE 88 

WASKEY DEBORAH ANNETTE 88. 154 

WASKEY DONALD RAYMOND 132 

WASSERMAN AMY LOUISE 132. 155 

WATERFIELD JAMES RICHARD 114 

WATKINS CYNTHIA ANNE 132. 145 

WATKINS KIMBERLY LYNN 88. 145 

WATKINS RANI LEA 88. 168. 169 

WATSON ANDREA JEAN 132. 185 

WATSON MATTHEW CHARLES 88. 139 

WATSON WILLIAM 57 

WATTS MARIA LYNNE 1 

WEATHERFORD MITCHELL K 88 

WEAVER JIM 57. 154 

WEAVER JOHN ELDEN 132 

WEBBER LAURIE ANN 88 

WEBBER TERESA LYNN 132 

WEBBER THOMAS GRAY JR 132 

WEEKS JEFFRY ROBERT 132. 178 

WEEKS SHANNON LEE 132 

WEEKS WALTER LEWIS 114 

WEESE KATHERINE LYNN 114. 160 

WEIGEL JEFFREY W 132 

WEINSTEIN JULIE ANN 132, 160 

WEIR SEAN DYLAN 114 

WEITTENHILLER DANA D 132. 161 

WELCH JERRY CLIFFORD 88. 239 

WELDON WILLIAM FREDERICK 132 

WELLS DANIEL Q 132 

WELLS DANIEL WARREN 88 

WELLS HILDA 176 

WELLS SUSAN LORRAINE 114 

WELSH JEFFREY SCOTT 132 

WELZANT ROBERT CHARLES 88 



WENDT TINA M 132, 181 

WERBISKIS TAMMIE LYNNE 12, 1 14. 149 

WERNER KENT MICHAEL 32 

WERNER KEVIN M 1 14 

WERNER KURT M I 

WERTH JENNIE ANNE 88 

WESBERRY ADAM HEATH 3. 79. 88 

WESBERRY WENDI LYNN 132 

WESSEL MICHAEL THOMAS 132 

WEST BRETT MATHEW 88. 178. 179. 26 

WEST CARRIE LYNN 14. 32. 61. 88. 146, 147. 172. 190, 

92 

WEST KELLIE ELIZABETH 114, 147. 168, 169, 185 

WEST ROBIN LYNN 88, 133 

WETTERIMG SHERYL LYNN 114 

WEYGANDT MARK JOSEPH 133 

WHALEN KIMBERLY ANNE 133. 144. 145 

WHALEN MICHAEL DEAN 88. 160 

WHEELER KELLY MICHELE 114. 168, 169 

WHINERY WILLIAM HENRY 88, 151 

WHITAKER ANNETTE L 88. 154 

WHITBY KATHRYN ANN 133 

WHITE ANNETTE RENEE 114 

WHITE CAROLYN DEE 133 

WHITE NORMAN EVAN 133 

WHITE PAULA KAY 114 

WHITE ROBERT LEWIS 114. 156. 176 

WHITEHURST TRACY JEAN 115. 147. 176, 177, 184, 

185, 194, 195 

WHITLEY RHONDA KAY 133 

WHITTAKER SANDY JEAN 88. 145. 160 

WHITTIER SCOTT ALLEN 37. 115. 170. 171. 187. 189. 

197 

WIDEL PETER MICHAEL 88 

WIDENER MARK WAYNE 88 

WIECHMAN MICHAEL CLAYTON 132. 133 

WIERSCH CYNTHIA LOU 115. 160. 181 

WIERSCH MICHAEL PATRICK 144,76.89. 146, 160. 183 

WIETING ERIC ROBERT 133 

WILKINSON ROBIN RENEE 133 

WILKINSON SANDI EILEEN 115 

WILLARD RANDALL NORMAN 115. 187 

WILLIAMS ANNA MARIE 1 15 

WILLIAMS CHARLES 176 

WILLIAMS DARRYL DAVID 133. 193 

WILLIAMS ELIZABETH ALICE 133 

WILLIAMS JANEL BERNADETT 115. 154 

WILLIAMS JEFFERY ALLEN 89 

WILLIAMS JOHN ANTHONY 115. 204 

WILLIAMS NIKLAS VAN 115 

WILLIAMS RICHARD LEE 115 

WILSON ANTHONY 133 

WILSON EDWIN ROBERT 133. 189 

WILSON JAMES P 89 

WILSON JULIA ANN 115. 168. 169 

WILSON ROBERT BENJAMIN 133 

WILSON ROBERT EDWARD 133 

WILSON ROD 170. 171 

WINCHESTER TIMOTHY DEAN 133 

WINGROVE DUANE EARL 89 

WINSLOW JAMES 57. 222 

WINSLOW MICHELE 115 

WINSTON MATTHEW MAURICE 133 

WISE GEORGE ANTHONY 1 15 

WISE LEIGH MICHELLE 133 

WITMER CYNTHIA DAWN 155 

WITMER MARK HUNTINGTON 133 



^' 



WOLCOTT STAGEY KATHLEEN 115 

WOOD CARMEN RENEE 133 

WOOD JOHN HOWARD 115. 189 

WOOD JOHN MURPHY 115 

WOOD KEITH GREGORY 133 

WOODFIN BERNICE 57 

WOODS VALORIE SUE 133 

WOOLARD ROBIN LYNN 133 

WOOLDRIDGE BRICE W 115. 151. 160 

WOOLRIDGE STEPHEN TODD 133 

WORKMAN JOHN DARIN 133 

WORKMAN SHELL RAE 89. 154 

WORRELL KRIS ALICIA 13. 61. 58. 59. 149 

WORRELL STEVEN GREGORY 133 

WORST TIMOTHY PATRICK 133. 187. 193 

WORTH ANGELIA FAY 89. 154 

WRAY JEFFREY THOMAS 115 

WRIGHT CYNTHIA LEE 61. 65. 67. 89 

WRIGHT DANA MARIE 89 

WRIGHT TRACY LYNN 133 

WUCHER SCOT WADE 89 

WUNDERLY CHRISTINE E 21. 146. 147, 168, 169 

WUNSCH LYNDA KAYE 133 



YYyy 



YAMADA DARLA LEHUA 133 
YOUNG ALEXANDER R 115 
YOUNG JULIA BENNETT 133 
YOUNG KIMBERLY ANNE 133 



ZZzz 



ZADELL JOHN 36. 57 

ZICAFOOSE KIMBERLY ELIZA 133 

ZIERDEN COURTNEY LANE 14, 89, 142, 164. 90, 92 

ZIMMERMAN AMY LYNN 133 

ZMARTHIE KELLY LYNN 133 

ZMARTHIE KIM MARIE 89 

ZULUETA VIRGINIA C 133 

ZWIEBEL KIMBERLY KAY 133 

ZYZAK DAVID VINCENT 89 



Colophon 



The 1984 Image was created by 
Kempsville's yearbook staff and 
published by Jostens American Year- 
book Company, represented by Richard 
Esleeck. The company produced 1450 
copies of the yearbook, each of which 
contains 240 pages. 

The copy style was Korinna (Style 21 
and 22). The cover is a blue leather-tone 
embossed. 



Index/235 



Barry Chovitz and Scott Clark display their pleasure 
in shaving after the conclusion of the musical. Came- 
lot. 



Craig Hudson shows the fun he is having while work 
Ing on the school's senior sign. 




I^^/'J I ^^^^' being assigned a term paper for English class, 

C\(j A J I 1 1 \ I Alesia Hall takes time out from her busy schedule to 

M^-'JT ^C^COOO / l-\ ^*' ^^ needed information. 

\_J(j\,_Lj L f ' V_y U^ l)^^ " ^ V / VV-) The Neptune Festival proved to play 

^ ^/'^ / -* )Ci_^ J^ ( \ ( r^ /lr^\ >fr y4 / *— TW^ part of Kempsville High Schools extra 



an important 
curricular ac 




P65- 



T 




In 
Parting 



With the end of the year nearing, 
many trying times have passed 
Kempsville by. Fortunately, with those try- 
ing moments, happy ones have stepped in 
to make 1983-84 a special year captured 
within the pages of this /ma^eedition. Very 
few people recognize the diligent efforts, 
creativity, and devotion which go into the 
publication of such a large annual. The 
human efforts behind this yearbook de- 
serve to be commended. Therefore we, the 
editors, feel a small, but sincere, note of 
appreciation is fitting, although it can nev- 
er express our true gratitude. 

The year started very early for the edito- 
rial staff. A yearbook convention helped 
introduce us to our new publishers, Jos- 
tens'. Mr. Richard Escleek, our representa- 
tive, proved to be very helpful during our 
frantic deadlines. He was the calm, cool, 
and sensible force during the times we 
needed him the most. His ideas helped in- 
spire other ideas from the staff. 

Miss Celia Robnett, our yearbook spon- 
sor, has guided the staff expertly by allow- 
ing the students to decide what the year- 
book should hold dear. Every day sixth 
bell, she patiently stood by while we and 
the staff transformed her average, orderly 
English room into a shuffled madhouse. 

The photographers, who never seemed 
to get a break, possessed the worst posi- 
tions on the staff. Their responsibilities 
were tremendous even with the support of 
Mrs. Clair. Throughout the year, little has 
been said — but it is clearly understood 
that the yearbook would not become a re- 
ality without their pictures. 

The book itself could not have been pro- 
duced without the earnest efforts from the 
Image staff. Although we never showed 
our appreciation, it was always there. The 
yelling and screaming were our ways of 
pushing you, the staff, to do your very 
best. Hopefully, the finished product will 
do justice to your efforts. 

Finally, we want to wish everyone on the 
staff — Good Luck and have a great time 
next year. 



Editors' Page/237 






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he end of the year has come and with it we realize that we 
have gained not only a diploma, but also a year that seems 
in itself to have contained enough learning to fill several life- 
times. 

This year our school, like us, has come of age. We can't help 
but wonder how many secrets of the past its walls contain. How 
many tears have been shed here, how many dreams born? Years 
and years of sophomores, juniors, and seniors have passed 
through these halls, each class different in its own individual 
way. 

This is our age, the new age. It is a time when the realization 
hits that we're not just eighteen-year-old high school kids, we are 
adults. 

The school has matured and us along with it. Never again will 
KHS be 18, and never again will we. It's a special time for 
making the transition of sophomore to junior, junior to senior, 
and senior to adult. Yet some of us must start once again at the 
bottom of the ladder, but with the reassurance that the end of 
one dream gives way to the beginning of a new dream. 










ID 



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V\Sophomore Kristie Tretheway remembers all that this 
■ year has held, yet dreams of returning one step higher on 



e ladder as a junior 







Year alter year Kempsvilles halls are filled with busy 
Kempsville students, trying to make it to class on time 



What a way to make English class a cheerful learning 
experience. 



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JBTTj^.^'^pi Seniors Mike Walker and Jerry Welch check out tha 

rrr*"' ' *1^^^H sights at Mount Tras hmore. "What s the matter guysj 

•••B'iS no waves?" ^ 

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Maureen Bastek is striving for a district title as Kempsville's field hockey goaliej 



.'Served ^^'toc HoU^ 



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i.^^ft^fC/rir.r, 










Closing/239 



■ i 



Although we leave the naive and 
imple days of childhood behind, the 
nemories remain. Each end marl<s a 
ew beginning as we come of age. 

.^e move onward, but not without 

reflections of the past. 



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